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Are you a bad tipper? - Page 14

post #196 of 234
I've seen it done before... also, anytime someone just walks out that's more or less what they're doing... my buddy did that one time, but it was a totally ridiculous case. He was sitting in an Acapulco's mexican restaurant, and he was getting up from his chair to go to the restroom after finishing his meal when a waiter ran into him and spilled salsa all over him, and then had the nerve to tell him that he should watch where he was going.
post #197 of 234
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Last night, for the first time in my life, I specificaly tipped on the cost of the meal without tax. If nothing else, this little piece of information gained will save me enough money over the course of the year to buy some new socks.
Thank god, maybe I will make a sale soon, it has been a rough day. An edit to go with drizz, I had a friend once who at dinner went to the head, nd his plate was only half finished, but the damn waiter took his food and did away with his plate....ain't that some crap. He was dining alone, his wife was out of town, and, for whatever reason, the waiter decided he was full.
post #198 of 234
I once was at a huge trade show - the type that totally overwelms the city that it is in, about 10 years ago. I went with a collegue of mine to take his best distributor out to dinner. The distributor, his wife, my collegue and me - we get to this very crowded place and the service is awful. aside from a lot of small things, they don't bring the distributors main course, and since the waiter says it is on its way out, the distributor has us all start and then we realize that the waiter had not put in his main course order. so we decided to walk out, after having drinks and wine and 3 main courses and appitizers. we really needed to show the distributor that we wouldn't let his get screwed over. anyway, we get get into a little fight with the waiters and end up rolling up a 100 mark note and tossing it on the floor (from a total bill of maybe 400 marks). 10 years later, and 4 companies later, I still work with the same distributor, though.
post #199 of 234
Here goes a long one.... Strange for someone who just normally lurks Quite honestly this is turning in to absolute crap. (I say that risking the wrath of the admin. I really enjoy this forum, but am getting ill from this thread. I know I should quit reading it, but it is like a train wreck, I can't stop watching). Something like tipping should not create such a disturbance on a forum like this. I have stated that my attitude is toward tipping on the heavier side and I am fine with that. Between my work background and my upbringing I am not going to change it. Other people have different experiences in life and may approach tipping in a different manner. Whatever... Nightowl, your philosophy on tipping sounds perfectly fine with me. You take care of servers that take care of you, and great. You also don't seem to think about it enough to let it ruin your evening. I think that during my bartending days, I would have been happy to have you in my bar. (Other than the fact that you are a Dawg. Go Jackets...). BTW, I agree that it is not easy to get a good curry in Atlanta. I lived there for most of my life, and strangely enough, I get better curries now that I live in Amsterdam. If you are ever in my town, let me know and I will take you out for one. I will even tip well. (Not such an issue in Amsterdam) Drizz, it seems to me to that you put more thought into tipping than is really necessary. For all the effort that you expend in telling how much you spent on dinner and the cost of the wines you drank, I don't really see why this is such a big deal to you. And for all the references you make to the "friends and family" that you have had in the "industry", you seem very indifferent to what the job entails. Your figure of a 5-10 dollar tip for most of your meals does not necessarily jive with your $150 meals plus corkage fees. (Don't make me quote it) But you know what? That is your right. Tipping is not mandatory; it is up to your discretion. You seem to be fine with it, so whatever. Just don't be offended if we ever go out to dinner and you pay the tab, but I slip an extra 20 under my plate for the server. (And justifying your small tip by saying that the server has enough tables to make a decent hourly wage out of them with your crap tip is just %$*#. Its like saying Brioni makes enough per suit off the other guys, so I am gonna just shoplift this one for me. Don't be the guy that shorts your share of the tab because your buddy threw in an extra 5.) Tokyo, good for you.. You do what you do and sounds like you make your living and pay your way. We have all dealt with people who are good tippers, bad tippers, etc... When it comes down to it, they are what they are, and there is not much that we can do to change that. The way I looked at it was that everyone has their own issues. Some tip well, some don't. Some think about it too much, and it's better to let them be. If this subject is going to have so much effect on their enjoyment of evenings out that they have to put extraordinary effort into tip thought (calculating 2-3% up and down), then they probably have a lot more issues than just this. Not worth the time. Just take comfort in the fact that there are some of us out there that will still hook you up. To the rest of you still thinking about the tipping situation in the US, give it up. Just like your gay cousin, its here to stay. If you really hate it that much, then make your stand. Short your tip, write your congressman, whatever... It's now part of eating out in the US, and if you decide to buck the trend, then it's your prerogative. If that floats your boat, then go to town. Just don't be that guy that was perfectly happy enjoying his meal and leaving a tip, but because of this thread now starts busting out the calculator to deduct wine, calculate pretax total, then multiply by 15% (subtracting 2% for every time that you glass is empty). Not only is that crap on the part of the servers pocketbook, but when I was serving it would really make me sad to see someone who should be having a fun night out with their friends concerning themselves sooooo much about the extra 5 bucks. I would rather that you keep your money and have a nice night than go through the anguish that is tipping. Sounds like you need it more than me, whether it is for you wallet or you mental state. I grew up in the US and bartended there for years. I have now been living in Europe for the past 3 years and have experienced both aspects of the tipping culture. My personal preference is for the tipping in the US, but that is me. I see very distinct differences in service between the two and before someone says, "Lets just raise the standard wage rate and have service included in the prices", I suggest that you experience it for a while. I am not just talking about your romantic trip to Paris where you really didn't notice anything because you were looking dreamily into your wife's eyes, but really experience a "service compris" culture. For those of you who have, you would have your preferences... Good for you. I have mine.... I am sure that there are responses and that people can take quotes from this and make their little rebuttals, but I am not really interested. Maybe you even think I misquoted or misunderstood you. Save it and the couple of bucks in your pocket that should have been your tip. I have said my piece and made my peace, and I am done. If you tip high, good for you. If you have different ideas on it then do your thing. Short it, complain about it. think about it too much. Whatever you have to do to justify it.... K
post #200 of 234
I love this man, even if he is a Jack...et.....let the train wreck continue...your thoughts are well written, and you are too totally right, there is way too much time having been spent on this issue, but it has been fun.
post #201 of 234
I certainly think this has been a more entertaining thread than Black Suit.
post #202 of 234
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I love this man, even if he is a Jack...et.....
Well, a lot of my friends were Dawgs. I did enjoy Athens when I felt like slumming it a little.
post #203 of 234
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I certainly think this has been a more entertaining thread than Black Suit.
We try.....even if some people get a little hot under the collar, I guess I should take a little credit for being such an ass, but it is fun. Slumming, paaaaleease....have you been near that little trade school down near Techwood lately, I wouldn't trust my cop brother with his gun down there alone.
post #204 of 234
...sadly I know more about tipping then I do about black suits.
post #205 of 234
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Slumming, paaaaleease....have you been near that little trade school down near Techwood lately, I wouldn't trust my cop brother with his gun down there alone.
Yeah, I know it isn't always pretty, but Georgia Tech was home for a few good college years. (Well maybe more than a few. I had a bit too much fun for a while.) K
post #206 of 234
I don't spend alot of time calculating the tip, it usually takes 20-30 seconds of mental reflection before I put it in the folder. I generally prefer European service generally because you don't have to deal with alot of the bs. They just bring your food and leave you alone.
post #207 of 234
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Originally Posted by ViroBono,Feb. 14 2005,13:25
The most popular dish is chicken tikka masala, which is entirely unknown in Asia.
This was supper on my first evening in Peshawar.
I was inaccurate - dish was invented for the British palate - it's the curry version of chop suey. Some interesting facts about Chicken Tikka Masala: Tikka
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I once was at a huge trade show - the type that totally overwelms the city that it is in, about 10 years ago. I went with a collegue of mine to take his best distributor out to dinner. The distributor, his wife, my collegue and me - we get to this very crowded place and the service is awful. aside from a lot of small things, they don't bring the distributors main course, and since the waiter says it is on its way out, the distributor has us all start and then we realize that the waiter had not put in his main course order. so we decided to walk out, after having drinks and wine and 3 main courses and appitizers. we really needed to show the distributor that we wouldn't let his get screwed over. anyway, we get get into a little fight with the waiters and end up rolling up a 100 mark note and tossing it on the floor (from a total bill of maybe 400 marks).
Was this in Dusseldorf, by any chance? I lived there for a while, and whenever trade shows were on everywhere was full and the service took a dive. My father came to trade show so I took him to a restaurant in the Altstadt I'd been to before. It was packed, but we finally got a table. We didn't get our starters at all, then they brought the main course without vegetables; drinks took an age and we got the bill instead of our coffee. The waiter expected me to pay the whole bill, including the missing starters and coffee, so I asked to see the proprietor. He apologised and waived the whole bill when I told him I lived in Dusseldorf.
post #208 of 234
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TokyoSlim was right, as this high-brow attitude, comined with the general sentiment that we don't work hard enough to justify an additonal dollar or two really irritates me.
I don't disagree that you may work hard; I just think that your employer should pay you directly.
post #209 of 234
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(Horace @ Feb. 15 2005,06:35) Though a full consideration of the effect would get us into a discussion of thorny economic issues which I am not equipped to debate, I don't mind paying considerably more for a pizza if the person who is delivering it makes a living wage and is afforded health insurance. What I don't like to see are corporations (be they public or private) too top heavy in salary & compensation at the expense of workers who are paid a miserable wage.
My God, a living wage?  Should we pay everyone a living wage?  Honestly? Come on, while some pizza delivery people depend on their earnings for survival, many are students doing it to earn extra spending money.  Some are using their mom or dad's car, who may also be paying the insurance on it, and they're taking the earnings.  Why in God's name would we want to ruin our economy with the horribly inflated prices we would suffer if we had to pay everyone a living wage? If pizza drivers were paid a living wage, I'm almost certain that the resulting price increase would result in my never ordering a pizza again; I would pick it up myself.  Many pizza drivers would be left without work after the demand for delivery decreased to next to nothing.  So, are they better off being paid as they are, or are they better off collecting unemployment for several months before they go on to collect welfare?  If you're advocating a living wage, I have a feeling you're skewed towards the latter.
Yes honestly. Not sure if you're being ironic or not. Well, my original comments concerned a more just distribution of compensation within a corporate structure (and I might add: by force of government if necessary), but I Love the way your thinking is predicated on the idea that many must suffer so that others may prosper. What flawed thinking. Your previous comments on your parents "working hard" to give you funds is quite revealing. It assumes that only those with money have worked hard. As if the more shmo who delivers your pizza or the woman who cleans the houses of suburban parents are not working hard. (Or single mothers for that matter). I don't have time to address your comments on the welfare state now, but you've got a false dichotomy there. Toodle Pip, H. P.S. Even college students deserve a living wage. PPS. I have a feeling that if pizza prices were raised a few dollars, it wouldn't break you and you wouldn't stop ordering pizza. In fact, I'd hazard a guess that if you looked at your expenditures, you'd find all sorts of things you could do with out, so you wouldn't have to go without your pizza.
post #210 of 234
VB, yes, in dusseldorf. I lived there for a while, and I get back once a year for a trade show.now I make standing reservations for the week I am there so that I don't have to worry about the crowds. by the way, hannover is even worse during CiBIT.
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