or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Are you a bad tipper?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Are you a bad tipper? - Page 13

post #181 of 234
For anyone who may or may not be interested, I made $39 in tips/delivery fees tonight for a 10 hour day. (or just over 11.00 an hour total with minimum wage) Dead as hell this morning, I got to work at 10:30am, and my first delivery was at 5pm. Pretty damn busy the last three hours for valentines day, so its a good thing I got everything ready and clean from 10:30-5pm... Must be lots of lonely people out there tonight to order pizza and sit at home watching TV. Tip your pizza guy.
post #182 of 234
Quote:
Nightowl, you are starting to irritate me, and I'm not even a delivery driver. A few reasons for tipping pizza guys, from a concerned website:    * Every three days, a driver must refill the gas tank. Pizza companies don't pay for gas. Drivers pay for their own.    * A driver's car needs an oil change every six weeks.    * Every three or four months, new brake pads are needed.    * Every four months, tires should be rotated or replaced. A driver gets a flat tire four times a year, mostly from incrementally scraping the tire's side on the street curb.    * On an average night, a driver travels 75 to 100 miles on deliveries, averaging four solid hours of drive-time mostly on residential streets.    * Of all places to drive, residential driving puts the most wear and tear on a car. All the starting, stopping, and changing of gears is murder on a car. It wears down the brakes in a hurry. Residential driving is even worse than normal city driving. The likelihood of any conceivable car problem is accelerated.    * Car insurance does not cover accidents during deliveries. You have to buy special insurance for that, which costs three times as much. Should a driver be in an accident without this special insurance, they have no coverage even by the pizza company. The store covers third party liability only.    * A driver travels 25,000 miles a year on the job.
We should really be getting pissed off at all the greedy restaurant owners.
post #183 of 234
Quote:
Quote:
(Debaser @ Feb. 14 2005,09:11) Nightowl, you are starting to irritate me, and I'm not even a delivery driver. A few reasons for tipping pizza guys, from a concerned website:    * Every three days, a driver must refill the gas tank. Pizza companies don't pay for gas. Drivers pay for their own.    * A driver's car needs an oil change every six weeks.    * Every three or four months, new brake pads are needed.    * Every four months, tires should be rotated or replaced. A driver gets a flat tire four times a year, mostly from incrementally scraping the tire's side on the street curb.    * On an average night, a driver travels 75 to 100 miles on deliveries, averaging four solid hours of drive-time mostly on residential streets.    * Of all places to drive, residential driving puts the most wear and tear on a car. All the starting, stopping, and changing of gears is murder on a car. It wears down the brakes in a hurry. Residential driving is even worse than normal city driving. The likelihood of any conceivable car problem is accelerated.    * Car insurance does not cover accidents during deliveries. You have to buy special insurance for that, which costs three times as much. Should a driver be in an accident without this special insurance, they have no coverage even by the pizza company. The store covers third party liability only.    * A driver travels 25,000 miles a year on the job.
We should really be getting pissed off at all the greedy restaurant owners.
Ummmm, why should we be pissed off? I'm sure that they could arrange a system to compensate their drivers for all of that, if you want your pizza to cost $25, but I'm sure you'd be as pissed off about that and you would be less likely to order.
post #184 of 234
Quote:
The most popular dish is chicken tikka masala, which is entirely unknown in Asia.
This was supper on my first evening in Peshawar.
post #185 of 234
Quote:
Well, if you're not dining at Masa and your tab is $3k and not mostly wine, you're eating at pretty expensive places  Generally it isn't accepted practice to tip on the wine (because the sommelier will generally make a commission for selling bottles, at a nicer restaurant) but some people do in any case (they figure it's an expense acct, so whatever)  I generally will give a lower percentage tip for the wine portion of my bill.
YOUR TABLE IS READY by JOHN KENNEY You do not seize control at Masa. You surrender it. You pay to be putty. And you pay dearly. . . . Lunch or dinner for two can easily exceed $1,000. "”From the Times' review of Masa, a sushi restaurant that was given four stars. Am I very rich? Since you ask, I will tell you. Yes, I am. I happen to be one of the more successful freelance poets in New York. The point being, I eat where I like. And I like sushi. As does my wife, Babette. Unfortunately, we were running late. This worried me. I had been trying to get a reservation at Masa since 1987, seventeen years before it opened, as I knew that one of the prerequisites of dining there was a knowledge of the future. I also knew of the restaurant's strict "on-time" policy. Babette and I arrived exactly one minute and twenty-four seconds late. We know this because of the Swiss Atomic clock that diners see upon arrival at Masa. The maître d' did not look happy. And so we were asked, in Japanese, to remove our clothes, in separate dressing cabins, and don simple white robes with Japanese writing on the back that, we soon found out, translated as "We were late. We didn't respect the time of others." Babette's feet were bound. I was forced to wear shoes that were two sizes too small. The point being, tardiness is not accepted at Masa. (Nor, frankly, should it be.) The headwaiter then greeted us by slapping me in the face and telling Babette that she looked heavy, also in Japanese. (No English is spoken in the restaurant. Translators are available for hire for three hundred and twenty-five dollars per hour. We opted for one.) And so it was that Babette, Aki, and I were led to our table, one of only seven in the restaurant, two of which are always reserved"”one for former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, who died five years ago, and the other for the actress and singer Claudine Longet, who accidentally shot and killed her boyfriend, the skier Spider Sabich, in 1976. There are no windows in Masa. The light is soft, and, except for the tinkling of a miniature waterfall and the piped-in sound of an airplane losing altitude at a rapid rate, the place is silent. We sat on hemp pillows, as chairs cost extra and we were not offered any, owing to our tardiness. Thirty-five minutes later, we met our wait staff: nine people, including two Buddhist monks, whose job it is to supervise your meal, realign your chakras, and, if you wish, teach you to play the oboe. Introductions and small talk"”as translated by Aki (which, we later learned, means "Autumn")"”lasted twenty minutes. I was then slapped again, though I'm not sure why. Before any food can be ordered at Masa, one is required to choose from an extensive water menu (there is no tap water at the restaurant). With Aki's help, we selected an exceptional bottle of high-sodium Polish sparkling water known for its subtle magnesium aftertaste (a taste I admit to missing completely). Henna tattoos were then applied to the bases of our spines. Mine depicted a donkey, Babette's a dwarf with unusually large genitals. Then it was time to order"”or to be told what we were having, as there is no menu. Babette and I had been looking forward to trying an inside-out California roll and perhaps some yellowtail. Not so this night. I was brought the white-rice appetizer and Babette was brought nothing. Aki said this was not uncommon, and then told us a story about his brother, Akihiko ("Bright Boy"), who has, from the sound of it, a rather successful motor-home business outside Kyoto. I noticed another guest a few tables away being forced to do pushups while the wait staff critiqued his wife's outfit. Aki saw me looking at them and translated the words on the back of their robes: "We were twenty minutes late. We are bad." It was then that our entrées arrived and we realized why this restaurant is so special. Before us were bay scallops, yellow clams, red clams, and exotic needlefish, all lightly dusted with crushed purple shiso leaves. Unfortunately, none of these dishes was for us. They were for the wait staff, who enjoyed them with great gusto while standing beside our table. They nodded and smiled, telling us, through Aki, how good it all tasted. Aki told us that this was very common at fine Japanese restaurants and urged us to be on time in the future, even though he said we would never be allowed on the premises again. He then gave us a brochure for a motor home. Babette and I were strongly advised to order more water. For dessert, I ordered nothing, as I was offered nothing. Babette was given a whole fatty red tuna wrapped in seaweed, served atop a bowl of crushed ice and garnished with a sign reading, "Happy Anniversary, Barbara" (sic). Our bill came to eight hundred and thirty-nine dollars. Aki said we were lucky to get out for so little and then begged us to take him with us when we left. We caught a cab and got three seats at the bar at Union Square Café.
post #186 of 234
Quote:
Quote:
(Horace @ Feb. 14 2005,23:13)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debaser,Feb. 14 2005,09:11
Nightowl, you are starting to irritate me, and I'm not even a delivery driver. A few reasons for tipping pizza guys, from a concerned website:    * Every three days, a driver must refill the gas tank. Pizza companies don't pay for gas. Drivers pay for their own.    * A driver's car needs an oil change every six weeks.    * Every three or four months, new brake pads are needed.    * Every four months, tires should be rotated or replaced. A driver gets a flat tire four times a year, mostly from incrementally scraping the tire's side on the street curb.    * On an average night, a driver travels 75 to 100 miles on deliveries, averaging four solid hours of drive-time mostly on residential streets.    * Of all places to drive, residential driving puts the most wear and tear on a car. All the starting, stopping, and changing of gears is murder on a car. It wears down the brakes in a hurry. Residential driving is even worse than normal city driving. The likelihood of any conceivable car problem is accelerated.    * Car insurance does not cover accidents during deliveries. You have to buy special insurance for that, which costs three times as much. Should a driver be in an accident without this special insurance, they have no coverage even by the pizza company. The store covers third party liability only.    * A driver travels 25,000 miles a year on the job.
We should really be getting pissed off at all the greedy restaurant owners.
Ummmm, why should we be pissed off?  I'm sure that they could arrange a system to compensate their drivers for all of that, if you want your pizza to cost $25, but I'm sure you'd be as pissed off about that and you would be less likely to order.
Though a full consideration of the effect would get us into a discussion of thorny economic issues which I am not equipped to debate, I don't mind paying considerably more for a pizza if the person who is delivering it makes a living wage and is afforded health insurance. What I don't like to see are corporations (be they public or private) too top heavy in salary & compensation at the expense of workers who are paid a miserable wage.
post #187 of 234
Quote:
Quote:
(ViroBono @ Feb. 14 2005,13:25) The most popular dish is chicken tikka masala, which is entirely unknown in Asia.
This was supper on my first evening in Peshawar.
See entire link: http://www.menumagazine.co.uk/tikkamasala.html One passage: However, exist it does and demanded it is, so just what is Chicken Tikka Masala? Tikkas are the bite-sized chunks you cut chicken into and these are marinated and cooked in the tandoor. The masala part is where things become difficult. Masala means spices but no exact recipe for these seems to exist. CTM can be yellow, red, brownish or even green and can be very creamy, a little creamy, chilli hot or quite mild. In restaurants it tends to be a creamy sauce - not too hot; a bit tomatoey; very smooth and, all too often, quite sweet and very red. In supermarkets, once you have by-passed the masses of CTM pizzas, filled pancakes, kievs, pies, microwave rolls and so on, you come to the chilled and frozen ready meals which range from mild onion gravy to saffron cream to velvety vermillion. Created on the spur of the moment under pressure it may have been but, as a culinary concept, the dish, if not the name, already existed.
post #188 of 234
Quote:
Quote:
(johnapril @ Feb. 15 2005,08:19)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ViroBono,Feb. 14 2005,13:25
The most popular dish is chicken tikka masala, which is entirely unknown in Asia.
This was supper on my first evening in Peshawar.
See entire link: http://www.menumagazine.co.uk/tikkamasala.html One passage: However, exist it does and demanded it is, so just what is Chicken Tikka Masala? Tikkas are the bite-sized chunks you cut chicken into and these are marinated and cooked in the tandoor. The masala part is where things become difficult. Masala means spices but no exact recipe for these seems to exist. CTM can be yellow, red, brownish or even green and can be very creamy, a little creamy, chilli hot or quite mild. In restaurants it tends to be a creamy sauce - not too hot; a bit tomatoey; very smooth and, all too often, quite sweet and very red. In supermarkets, once you have by-passed the masses of CTM pizzas, filled pancakes, kievs, pies, microwave rolls and so on, you come to the chilled and frozen ready meals which range from mild onion gravy to saffron cream to velvety vermillion. Created on the spur of the moment under pressure it may have been but, as a culinary concept, the dish, if not the name, already existed.
tikka is baked in a tandoor, usually. masala is a mixture of spices, sort of like the idea of curry, which is also a non-specific mixture of spices. chicken tikka masala is usually left over baked chicken cooked in a psudo-curry sauce. not the most indian of dishes, but not unheard of.
post #189 of 234
Masa is one of the restaurants I haven't eaten at in the Time Warner center, but personally I prefer not to spend inordinate amounts of money on sushi, I've found some nice places here in the LA area that are not extremely expensive that are outstanding.
post #190 of 234
Quote:
Though a full consideration of the effect would get us into a discussion of thorny economic issues which I am not equipped to debate, I don't mind paying considerably more for a pizza if the person who is delivering it makes a living wage and is afforded health insurance. What I don't like to see are corporations (be they public or private) too top heavy in salary & compensation at the expense of workers who are paid a miserable wage.
My God, a living wage? Should we pay everyone a living wage? Honestly? Come on, while some pizza delivery people depend on their earnings for survival, many are students doing it to earn extra spending money. Some are using their mom or dad's car, who may also be paying the insurance on it, and they're taking the earnings. Why in God's name would we want to ruin our economy with the horribly inflated prices we would suffer if we had to pay everyone a living wage? If pizza drivers were paid a living wage, I'm almost certain that the resulting price increase would result in my never ordering a pizza again; I would pick it up myself. Many pizza drivers would be left without work after the demand for delivery decreased to next to nothing. So, are they better off being paid as they are, or are they better off collecting unemployment for several months before they go on to collect welfare? If you're advocating a living wage, I have a feeling you're skewed towards the latter.
post #191 of 234
Quote:
Quote (Styleman @ Feb. 14 2005,15:36) I think the servers really need to stop whining. Styleman earns the honesty award today...congrats for the comment.....power to the masses.
I think you should all be as quick to open your wallets as you are to open your mouths.  Power to the servers.
Quote:
And to any of you out there who may harbor these holier than thou attitudes, I'd just like to say unapologetically, on behalf of the entire service industry - Eff You.
TokyoSlim was right, as this high-brow attitude, comined with the general sentiment that we don't work hard enough to justify an additonal dollar or two really irritates me.
Quote:
Since NY sales taxes are so damn high (8.625%) to calculate a tip I just double the sales tax which comes out to 17.25% and then round up or down depending on the service.
This method is quite fair and actually the method I use when dining out.  Note that this is on the pre-tax amount. Kevin
post #192 of 234
Quote:
Styleman earns the honesty award today...congrats for the comment.....power to the masses.
First off, that is my quote, and I hate people taking my quotes out of context.
Quote:
I think you should all be as quick to open your wallets as you are to open your mouths.  Power to the servers.
Secondly, do not talk to me about opening my wallet instead of my mouth quicker, my Mexican dinner bill tonight was $32....my tip, $10...so think before you shove your foot in your mouth, will I tip myself for that meal? Oh, nevermind...was going to add something, but it is not worth it.
post #193 of 234
Feel free to add. This is an open forum, and I would welcome your commentary. Kevin
post #194 of 234
Last night, for the first time in my life, I specificaly tipped on the cost of the meal without tax. If nothing else, this little piece of information gained will save me enough money over the course of the year to buy some new socks.
post #195 of 234
Thread Starter 
Here's something I've always wondered.  Is it possible to give a negative tip for service that is so atrocious that it detracts from the dining experience?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Are you a bad tipper?