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Are you a bad tipper? - Page 11

post #151 of 234
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You are socially retarded.
Quite possible, but irrelevant. You, on the other hand, are delusional.
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If that were true, why does the credit card receipt show ONLY THE TOTAL AMOUNT (not the pre-tax amount), before the blank "tip" line?
A (pre-answer answer): I try to pay cash, so I don't have to have the server back and forth bringing me receipts and crap. But in the case I use a card, the reason why it shows ONLY THE TOTAL AMOUNT is that that is what you will need to add your tip to, to come up with the final total, which is written below; also, it's so that the credit card receipt doesn't get confusing with all kinds of different totals. The check, which is that thing that comes from the restaurant before my method of payment is known, includes a subtotal, on which a customer is to apply a tip. Why do you think you should get paid more for being a server in a state with sales tax? Do you think that translates in any way to the amount of service you provide? If I eat in Vancouver WA, on the border with Oregon (which has no tax), I am not going to pay a 9% higher tip to my server there than the poor bastard who happens to live in OR. Besides being poor logic, it's not established practice.
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You're justifying yourself so you can be that much cheaper.
Yes, that must be it, because I'm socially retarded and cheap, correct? Au contraire, mon frere, you're justifying your extreme bitterness with whatever it is in your life that causes it by blaming it on your job and the socially retarded creatures you deign to serve. And now you are blaming me, and getting more pissed off, even though I have already told you I tip pretty well and expect relatively little. You're giving your profession a bad name, pal. Going a long way toward justifying your crap tips in the future. I eagerly await your next belittling, bitter, sad comment. Have a GREAT DAY.  
post #152 of 234
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Besides being poor logic, it's not established practice.
Really? Two links have already been posted regarding tipping etiquette. Both have declared it proper to tip based on the total amount, not the pre-tax subtotal. Care to cite a source for your "established" practice?
post #153 of 234
Thread Starter 
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Two links have already been posted regarding tipping etiquette.  Both have declared it proper to tip based on the total amount, not the pre-tax subtotal.
If you're referring to the links I provided, the first one stated that the tip should be on the pre-tax amount, the second stated that the tip should be on the total bill.  That leads me to believe there is no set rule.
post #154 of 234
From http://www.tipping.org/tips/TipsPageRestaurant.html :
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The Tip calculation should be based on the PRE-TAX [emphasis in original] ammount [sic].
The other link, http://azaz.essortment.com/tipping_rdef.htm is undefined on the matter, as though it says "total bill" it does not mention tax. However, this one does, and it says pre-tax, as does this one, this one, this one... seriously, do I need to go on? Pretty much every guide that mentions tax says pre-tax. Feel free to continue your wishful thinking/campaign to change the world, though. I notice that you totally ignored my other points.
post #155 of 234
At the restaurant: tips for the maitre 'd or host are a bit outdated unless you're a repeat business customer. But waiters depend on tips - their salaries go almost entirely for taxes. So 15-percent is standard, but it's closer to 20 percent, especially in big cities. Before taxes if the food and wine is $100, you'd leave $20. If there is a wine steward or sommelier, 15 percent of the wine tab goes to him or her. On a $30 bottle of wine that's six dollars. Tipping Source #1 Tips Your waiters tip is his primary income. You should tip 15% of the total before taxes, 20% for outstanding service is perfectly acceptable. Even if service is less then perfect, you should still leave at least 10% tip "”unless it was a nightmare"”in which case, you should talk with the management or maître d' . It is not out of line to send complements to the chief or to even ask for the chef to come to the table if possible. Chefs love to be praised for their food, even though in most big restaurants he or she is a manager and not a cook. Source #2 I can go on....but this does dis-spell your theory on tipping the final total...only tip on the net amount...not the tax
post #156 of 234
Thread Starter 
I'm convinced.  No tip on tax from this day forward.
post #157 of 234
Am I the only one that thinks basing the tip on the cost of the meal makes no sense at all? Does the server really do any more work for the customer who orders a $70 steak and lobster dinner vs. a $15 pasta dinner?   That said, I tend to be a good tipper, and tip based on the service.  There have been instances where I haven't left a tip, because it was obvious the server was an arrogant a-hole and just saw me as a college kid with his date who probably wouldn't leave a good tip or order an expensive meal. I tend to tip about 20%, but on lower bills I'll leave more just because I feel like a cheapskate leaving a 75 cent tip. There is a local chain of diner-style restaurants in my city that are very popular with college kids and locals, especially late at night (open 24 hours).  My friends and I always go to one near campus late at night.  The bill for each person is usually only $3-6, but I always leave at least $2.  I figure the waitress does a good job keeping my Coke full, bringing the food out as soon as it's done, not to mention the fact that they are working at 3am and they have tuition to pay, they deserve more than a 50 cent tip.  One night at this restaurant I had a friendly waitress that has served us several times in the past, and I picked up the tab for a friend and I - left $20 for an $8.50 bill.  She is always friendly to us and I was happy to do something nice for the day. Also, I always tip the pizza guy well when I order a pizza.  Always a few bucks.  Most likely 75% of the guy's deliveries are to college students given the neighborhood, so I figure that his tips are usually pretty weak. Also, I have always heard that you should tip on the pre-tax amount.
post #158 of 234
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Am I the only one that thinks basing the tip on the cost of the meal makes no sense at all? Does the server really do any more work for the customer who orders a $70 steak and lobster dinner vs. a $15 pasta dinner?   That said, I tend to be a good tipper, and tip based on the service.  There have been instances where I haven't left a tip, because it was obvious the server was an arrogant a-hole and just saw me as a college kid with his date who probably wouldn't leave a good tip or order an expensive meal. I tend to tip about 20%, but on lower bills I'll leave more just because I feel like a cheapskate leaving a 75 cent tip. There is a local chain of diner-style restaurants in my city that are very popular with college kids and locals, especially late at night (open 24 hours).  My friends and I always go to one near campus late at night.  The bill for each person is usually only $3-6, but I always leave at least $2.  I figure the waitress does a good job keeping my Coke full, bringing the food out as soon as it's done, not to mention the fact that they are working at 3am and they have tuition to pay, they deserve more than a 50 cent tip.  One night at this restaurant I had a friendly waitress that has served us several times in the past, and I picked up the tab for a friend and I - left $20 for an $8.50 bill.  She is always friendly to us and I was happy to do something nice for the day. Also, I always tip the pizza guy well when I order a pizza.  Always a few bucks.  Most likely 75% of the guy's deliveries are to college students given the neighborhood, so I figure that his tips are usually pretty weak. Also, I have always heard that you should tip on the pre-tax amount.
VM, my feeling is that the server at a $75 a head place should be better at his job than the server at the $15 place. might not be more work, but it should require moore expereince and expertise. if this is not the case, I won't be going back to the more expensive place.
post #159 of 234
Yeah, I pretty much agree with V-Man's scheme. I never leave less than 2 bucks even on a really cheap food bill, typically a dollar on each drink at a bar, and typically 20%+ of the pre-tax if the service was good on anything else. Where it gets confusing is in those places where you have to bus your own table, get your own utensils, cafeterias, and when you get a drink at the bar vs. having a waitress come out with it, etc. Edit: and it is kind of lame how a simple order of the most expensive thing on the menu gets tipped way more than a really irritating, detailed order for two salads with all kinds of crap on the side, cheap drinks to refill, etc. I also tend to scale tips based on the amount of work I made the guy/girl do.
post #160 of 234
I'm going to agree with VersaceMan on almost every point. I am generally a pretty good tipper, and I inherited this characteristic from my parents. Also, I will preface this by saying that the money I spend isn't mine. I am a student and my parents successes have allowed me to live pretty comfortably as a student, and for that I am extremely lucky and readily acknowledge that. However, I tip on the post tax total. Where I am from, Kentucky, we have 6% sales tax (where I live, in Maryland, it is only 5%). In Kentucky, tipping on the post tax amount for a $20 bill adds $.15. Not a great deal. So, for a $100 meal, tipping on post tax will increase the total by a whole $.90. Ninety cents doesn't make a big difference in my life, but I assume that to a server, who in an eight hour shift will serve maybe fifteen or twenty tables, the additional $13.50 to $18.00 will make a big difference, especially considering that his marginal utility is considerably greater than mine (or that of the other patrons who I am hoping are putting the additional $.90 in their tip).
post #161 of 234
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(VersaceMan @ Feb. 14 2005,11:47) Am I the only one that thinks basing the tip on the cost of the meal makes no sense at all? Does the server really do any more work for the customer who orders a $70 steak and lobster dinner vs. a $15 pasta dinner?   That said, I tend to be a good tipper, and tip based on the service.  There have been instances where I haven't left a tip, because it was obvious the server was an arrogant a-hole and just saw me as a college kid with his date who probably wouldn't leave a good tip or order an expensive meal. I tend to tip about 20%, but on lower bills I'll leave more just because I feel like a cheapskate leaving a 75 cent tip. There is a local chain of diner-style restaurants in my city that are very popular with college kids and locals, especially late at night (open 24 hours).  My friends and I always go to one near campus late at night.  The bill for each person is usually only $3-6, but I always leave at least $2.  I figure the waitress does a good job keeping my Coke full, bringing the food out as soon as it's done, not to mention the fact that they are working at 3am and they have tuition to pay, they deserve more than a 50 cent tip.  One night at this restaurant I had a friendly waitress that has served us several times in the past, and I picked up the tab for a friend and I - left $20 for an $8.50 bill.  She is always friendly to us and I was happy to do something nice for the day. Also, I always tip the pizza guy well when I order a pizza.  Always a few bucks.  Most likely 75% of the guy's deliveries are to college students given the neighborhood, so I figure that his tips are usually pretty weak. Also, I have always heard that you should tip on the pre-tax amount.
VM, my feeling is that the server at a $75 a head place should be better at his job than the server at the $15 place. might not be more work, but it should require moore expereince and expertise. if this is not the case, I won't be going back to the more expensive place.
Globetrotter, Good point. However, consider that the restaurant is the same; one table has a $90 tab for two people (two large steaks) and another table has a $30 tab for two people (two sandwiches). Assume no alcohol was purchased, and all four dinners ordered came with soup. Did the waiter work three times as hard to bring the food out for table #1? Should the service for table #2 be three times worse?
post #162 of 234
HS, I can understand your theory, but for an example, we have 8% taxes here, now a dinner the other night for 4 was $275 roughly, it was my turn to buy, now the pre-tax amount was roughly $250....to me there is a difference in a $50 tip and a $55...not much, but it is still the point, 20% was more than fair...do you not think, for 2 hours work.
post #163 of 234
I have to say that I previously had no idea that tipping was so complex in the US - or the subject of so much debate. When I have been in the US I have always based tips entirely on the service received. Thankfully, things are much simpler here - tipping of pizza or curry delivery drivers is not generally done, for example, and there's no sales tax on meals eaten in restaurants - such a relief for the 'socially retarded'....
post #164 of 234
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(globetrotter @ Feb. 14 2005,13:54)
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Originally Posted by VersaceMan,Feb. 14 2005,11:47
Am I the only one that thinks basing the tip on the cost of the meal makes no sense at all? Does the server really do any more work for the customer who orders a $70 steak and lobster dinner vs. a $15 pasta dinner?   That said, I tend to be a good tipper, and tip based on the service.  There have been instances where I haven't left a tip, because it was obvious the server was an arrogant a-hole and just saw me as a college kid with his date who probably wouldn't leave a good tip or order an expensive meal. I tend to tip about 20%, but on lower bills I'll leave more just because I feel like a cheapskate leaving a 75 cent tip. There is a local chain of diner-style restaurants in my city that are very popular with college kids and locals, especially late at night (open 24 hours).  My friends and I always go to one near campus late at night.  The bill for each person is usually only $3-6, but I always leave at least $2.  I figure the waitress does a good job keeping my Coke full, bringing the food out as soon as it's done, not to mention the fact that they are working at 3am and they have tuition to pay, they deserve more than a 50 cent tip.  One night at this restaurant I had a friendly waitress that has served us several times in the past, and I picked up the tab for a friend and I - left $20 for an $8.50 bill.  She is always friendly to us and I was happy to do something nice for the day. Also, I always tip the pizza guy well when I order a pizza.  Always a few bucks.  Most likely 75% of the guy's deliveries are to college students given the neighborhood, so I figure that his tips are usually pretty weak. Also, I have always heard that you should tip on the pre-tax amount.
VM, my feeling is that the server at a $75 a head place should be better at his job than the server at the $15 place. might not be more work, but it should require moore expereince and expertise. if this is not the case, I won't be going back to the more expensive place.
Globetrotter, Good point.  However, consider that the restaurant is the same; one table has a $90 tab for two people (two large steaks) and another table has a $30 tab for two people (two sandwiches).  Assume no alcohol was purchased, and all four dinners ordered came with soup.  Did the waiter work three times as hard to bring the food out for table #1?  Should the service for table #2 be three times worse?
good point. I have never given it that much thought.
post #165 of 234
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I have to say that I previously had no idea that tipping was so complex in the US - or the subject of so much debate.  When I have been in the US I have always based tips entirely on the service received.   Thankfully, things are much simpler here - tipping of pizza or curry delivery drivers is not generally done, for example, and there's no sales tax on meals eaten in restaurants - such a relief for the 'socially retarded'....  
God, why can't we have curry delivered here....and good curry like in the UK...globe-trotter will agree with me on that I am sure.
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