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Are you a bad tipper? - Page 10

post #136 of 234
Thread Starter 
Here's another list of tipping guidelines that states that tipping should be on the total bill.
post #137 of 234
TS, Consultants' compensation packages vary greatly. I have worked with three different houses, and in some, my compensation was salary + commission on a specific job, in some it was annual salary + bonus, and in others, it was based on my total billing for the year. The second formula is roughly analogous to pizza delivery, as salary + tips is a similar situation. However, what can certainly happen (and often does) is that problems arise and the consultant will put in far more hours then allocated, and the project may or may not be successfully completed. Therefore, they may not receive the commission portion of their compensation. Even if it is successfully completed, they may have put in far more time and effort than anticipated, to bring the project to successful completion, and certainly will not receive a gratuity. Why is this? Debaser, Most people I know tip on the pre-tax amount, I don't understand why you'd expect someone to pay additional gratuities on money going to the state government? Also, you're making it sound awfully unattractive to be a pizza delivery driver, why would people do so? Because generally with wage + tips, they make a pretty decent hourly wage.
post #138 of 234
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Man, tipping the "car park attendant" $1 seems like a risky maneuver to me. I mean, if you people are so concerned with spit on your pizza, imagine how a smashed up car might feel.
I usually tip a couple of bucks or more depending on the situation and always when I leave the car. I am not worried so much that they are going to smash the car, but more about scratches and dents and such. Things that are easy to say were already there. You are not going to put in an insurance claim for them, but they might drive you nuts.
post #139 of 234
Well, generally you're tipping the car park attendant after he brings your car back. If it's a nice car (and they're not out beating the crap out of it, i.e. Ferris Bueller's Day off) generally they will take good care of it (i.e. park it out front, so everyone can see it) so they will get a larger tip.
post #140 of 234
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(Tokyo Slim @ Feb. 14 2005,12:34) Man, tipping the "car park attendant" $1 seems like a risky maneuver to me. I mean, if you people are so concerned with spit on your pizza, imagine how a smashed up car might feel.
I usually tip a couple of bucks or more depending on the situation and always when I leave the car.  I am not worried so much that they are going to smash the car, but more about scratches and dents and such. Things that are easy to say were already there. You are not going to put in an insurance claim for them, but they might drive you nuts.
I have yet to use the same parking attendent twice. I know the delivery guys in my town pretty well.
post #141 of 234
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Nightowl, you are starting to irritate me, and I'm not even a delivery driver. A few reasons for tipping pizza guys, from a concerned website:    * Every three days, a driver must refill the gas tank. Pizza companies don't pay for gas. Drivers pay for their own.    * A driver's car needs an oil change every six weeks.    * Every three or four months, new brake pads are needed.    * Every four months, tires should be rotated or replaced. A driver gets a flat tire four times a year, mostly from incrementally scraping the tire's side on the street curb.    * On an average night, a driver travels 75 to 100 miles on deliveries, averaging four solid hours of drive-time mostly on residential streets.    * Of all places to drive, residential driving puts the most wear and tear on a car. All the starting, stopping, and changing of gears is murder on a car. It wears down the brakes in a hurry. Residential driving is even worse than normal city driving. The likelihood of any conceivable car problem is accelerated.    * Car insurance does not cover accidents during deliveries. You have to buy special insurance for that, which costs three times as much. Should a driver be in an accident without this special insurance, they have no coverage even by the pizza company. The store covers third party liability only.    * A driver travels 25,000 miles a year on the job.
I am so happy to irritate, now let us break down the points you make. My Domino's and Pizza Hut directly charges a delivery fee, which makes free delivery a thing of the past, they do this to cover overhead and expenses related to increased costs of ingredients etc.   see article Pizza Delivery Fee... Now for the rest of the break down again: Drivers in ATL are paid on average $8.50 and hour, plus mileage, normally $.35 per mile, plus a per pie charge, generally $.90. Now let us look at the rest, if a driver works and 8 hour shift, delivers 3 pies an hour, drives on average 100 miles in that 8 hours, he makes roughly without tips around $123, how uneducated people do you know making $15 an hour before even getting tips. Also, do you think the 35 cents a mile does not cover the maintenance on a car for driving 100 miles a night. I am not sure what you pay for a rotation and oil change, but I can guarantee that 2 weekends of 8 hour shifts will take care of it on an every other month basis and still leave money in the wallet. As to insurance, you already have it, and very few people are getting special delivery insurance to boot, if they are they are stupid. And to the overall driver responsibility, do you not think the driver knows that as a delivery guy he has expenses surrounding this line of work. The mileage money is not put in to be part of the pay, it is there to be expense money. I have a job, I drive back and forth in grueling traffic daily, but I do not get money for car maintenance, and I drive easily 20,000 a year, so maybe I should start asking for tips from customers just for me showing up....actually a good thing, when we next have a sale, I am going to put delivery charges for me showing up to work.
post #142 of 234
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You are socially retarded. If that were true, why does the credit card receipt show ONLY THE TOTAL AMOUNT (not the pre-tax amount), before the blank "tip" line? You're justifying yourself so you can be that much cheaper.
hey, piss J off a little more....please.
post #143 of 234
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The second formula is roughly analogous to pizza delivery, as salary + tips is a similar situation. However, what can certainly happen (and often does) is that problems arise and the consultant will put in far more hours then allocated, and the project may or may not be successfully completed. Therefore, they may not receive the commission portion of their compensation. Even if it is successfully completed, they may have put in far more time and effort than anticipated, to bring the project to successful completion, and certainly will not receive a gratuity. Why is this?
Your analogy again is flawed, you are assuming in comparison that your pizza was delivered late, or that it wasn't hot, or that it wasn't in good condition or something. All of which I have NO PROBLEM with a non-tipper for. All of those things are my fault. I have a problem when I am fast, the pizza is hot, and delicious, I'm courteous, smiling, I bring extras like mints, peppers, parm, and napkins, I'm presentable, and I count back your change if there is any - and the door shuts in my face. Thats what this whole discussion is about. Not people who don't tip for bad service, but people who don't tip at all. Cheap bastards. Oh, and by the way, nightowl - your delivery drivers in ATL are getting paid WAY more than any pizza delivery driver I've ever heard of. I do not get mileage, I do not get gas money, I do get $.80 a delivery from the $1 delivery fee, but I include that in my "tip" money and is thusly already accounted for. AND I am already paying $260 or so a month for full coverage insurance, seeing as how I have a car that I'm still paying off, its not the "delivery" insurance, which of course, no delivery driver outside Atlanta can afford. Maybe I should move to Atlanta...
post #144 of 234
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I have a problem when I am fast, the pizza is hot, and delicious,  I'm courteous, smiling, I bring extras like mints, peppers, parm, and napkins, I'm presentable, and I count back your change if there is any - and the door shuts in my face. Thats what this whole discussion is about. Not people who don't tip for bad service, but people who don't tip at all. Cheap bastards.
See Tokyo, a delivery guy like you deserves a little something, not because you delivered the pie, but because you went a little further than most do...I order from Dominos or who ever, they do not bring napkins, plates or plastic forks, they dump the pie, I give a 20 and they bigen to walk away, with no offer for change etc...that pisses me off, make an inquiry, I would be more apt to give a tip for a little service. You are right, you should, these guys make that much because no adults will work for that little in this traffic like it is here.
post #145 of 234
Well, if you're read my posts about this topic, I've said that I give tips when I get good service and I don't have a problem with doing so, I just have a problem with those individuals who think they deserve a tip whether they do a good job or not (i.e., it's part of their salary and they should get it, even if they are late, etc...)
post #146 of 234
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I don't tip any one except valets, sometimes taxi drivers (if they get there on time) and waiters (and sometimes sommeliers), I think the trend of random service employees jockeying for tips is ridiculous.
I am not a valet, taxi driver, or waiter (nor a sommelier) I thereby made the logical conclusion that you do not tip the pizza guy. And to be honest with you, I don't really agree that business consulting falls into the realm of "the service industry" but then again, I could be wrong. I, myself, have never been a "consultant". (*strech*yawn*, off to deliver pizzas to the elitist yuppy scum of the earth. have a good day everyone.)
post #147 of 234
I actually said this earlier, "I'll usually tip a couple bucks for Pizza delivery, maybe 10% or so of the bill, rounded up to the nearest dollar." so I assumed people understood that I did tip for pizza delivery.
post #148 of 234
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You are socially retarded. If that were true, why does the credit card receipt show ONLY THE TOTAL AMOUNT (not the pre-tax amount), before the blank "tip" line? You're justifying yourself so you can be that much cheaper.
It shows the total, because that is the amount you need to add your tip to in order to determine the total amount to charge your credit card. By the same logic why does the receipt you get before the one you sign have a sub-total line, a line for tax and a total line? I hardly think the slip of paper you sign is proof that you are intended to tip on the total bill. And if you keep pissing off J, this could end up being more interesting than I originally thought.
post #149 of 234
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(nightowl6261a @ Feb. 14 2005,05:56) Now honestly, do I feel a salesperson need be tipped, no, but I am trying to figure out why waiters and servers feel that when they do not adequately service, they feel still entitled to a generous tip. Is every job that deals with the public not truly a service industry job in some ways?
Depending on where a salesperson works, they have incentives, spiffs, and commission they work for. The people who work at busy stores, have regular clientele, and are good salespeople can do very well. Even if you don't think a salesperson was particularly attentive, or if you walked into a store knowing you were going to buy an item anyway, commission goes to the guy who is fortuitous enough to be standing near the register to push the buttons and put your wares in a bag. Serving, OTOH, is a much longer transaction that requires more attention and is in theory more tailored to a patron's needs and desires, but what their service is worth is up to however generous or stingy that patron wishes to be. Servers feel entitled to 20% every table they take because they feel that their efforts warrant it, and many of them feel they do their job well on every table. Their perception is their own reality. People who tip 12-15% of the pretax and meticulously grade their server may feel that they are getting their money's worth, and are giving the server a most accurate appraisal of the experience they have provided. Whether it is because they assume the server is a lackey who doesn't know how to do their job, they're stingy, or they're just particular about how they are served, their perception is also their own reality. Personally, grading unless it is in an extreme case--uncorrected server error versus kitchen error, glasses not refilled, waiting inordinate amount of time for the check, change, credit slip--is not worth it to me. Frankly, I don't understand why someone would want to, and that's not because I am a server. It's because I feel that a couple of bucks is usually all that separates a bad tip from a good one, and it is a negligible amount in the grand scheme of a meal out.
post #150 of 234
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And if you keep pissing off J, this could end up being more interesting than I originally thought.
Here here....
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