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Are you a bad tipper? - Page 9

post #121 of 234
an observation that I hope won't be taken as unkind - for an individual like Tokyo Slim, working as a pizza guy allows certain other lifestyle benifits. (and I say "like tokyo Slim" in that he is presently the only pizza guy I know and I know that he is somewhat young, unorthodox, and apparently bright enough to have other options, should he so choose them)- it allows freedom from other responibities, somewhat flexible hours, freedom to be unorthodox in many aspects of dress and grooming - in short it offers an intirely different package than a 9-5 office job does. and the pay and "tip" structure have to reflect that.
post #122 of 234
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You cannot argue that tipping is not a part of my standard wage, when even the IRS assumes a certain percentage.
Curious if you can file something that dissuades the old IRS from their belief?
post #123 of 234
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And one should only tip on the pre-tax amount, if for example I have a dinner that ranges in the $350 price tag, why should my server make an additional $5-$7 on the staes and counties and or cities income as well. Companies do not pay commission on post-tax sales, only on pre-tax.
In agreement with this. But Chris, you really should give the pizza guy a tip.
post #124 of 234
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it allows freedom from other responibities, somewhat flexible hours, freedom to be unorthodox in many aspects of dress and grooming
Yeah, It does help when I'm working two jobs. I also work full time job at Home Depot ( A non-commision, hourly wage job) I only work 11 hour shifts delivering pizza twice a week, on Mondays and Fridays, which are my days off at Depot. So then on tues-thurs and saturday sunday I work from 5am-2pm at Depot, and then deliver pizza from 4pm-8pm two of those days. God, how I love freedom from responsibility
post #125 of 234
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Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim,Feb. 13 2005,22:54
You cannot argue that tipping is not a part of my standard wage, when even the IRS assumes a certain percentage.
Curious if you can file something that dissuades the old IRS from their belief?
Well if your company is so inclined, they can change the designation on your W2 - but of course - that is illegal, so most places won't.
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Point #1 I do not pay commission Point #2 I do think my point should be taken clearly, tipping is good, but not as a mainstay to income, it should serve as a basis for good service and not be relied upon for wealth.
#1 So... you don't pay commision to your shoe salesmen? You must have a VERY regular client base, because otherwise you'd never survive as a small business owner. Just out of curiosity, how much an hour does your average shoe salesman make? #2 I agree - personally I don't like having to rely on the customers to tip me for most of my delivery income, but I also don't believe that the customers of the world would be willing to accept an across the board increase in the price of their food, haircuts, and etc. You think they bitch about TIPPING. Wait until everything in their life becomes $5 more expensive... While in reality they would probably be paying the same (or in some cases less depending on how good of a tipper they are) Those people who DON'T tip would be pissed. Why did the cost of dinner at your standard Applebees or whatever just go up $5 a plate? Why are you paying $22 for a hamburger? Well... people don't like to tip. Sorry.
post #126 of 234
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(nightowl6261a @ Feb. 14 2005,08:17) And one should only tip on the pre-tax amount, if for example I have a dinner that ranges in the $350 price tag, why should my server make an additional $5-$7 on the staes and counties and or cities income as well. Companies do not pay commission on post-tax sales, only on pre-tax.
In agreement with this.  But Chris, you really should give the pizza guy a tip.
Curious oyu would say that, for yesterday, after having a bad ass hangover, i ordered my first pizza in 2 years, and my bill was $16.53, and I actually gave $18, not a huge tip, but the order taker said 35-45 minutes and the damn thing arrived in 25, so I guess I broke my own rule....damn rules, I guess that is why they are there, just to break them. Tokyo, be honest, when you drive, what does your hourly average out to be with tips, mileage etc figured in at the end of each shift, I bet well over $10...and honestly, how many waiters/servers out there count all of the tips at the end of a shift to be taxed by the good ole IRS.
post #127 of 234
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Debaser Posted on Feb. 14 2005,10:57 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I have never heard of anyone tipping on the before-tax amount and this is in no way standard practice.
I have to strongly disagree with this statement. I eat out quite often with many different groups of friends and family and everyone is in agreement that you tip on the pre-tax amount. [/quote]j -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Quote I'm a server, and cannot believe how naive many of you are to the trials and tribulations the profession often entails. If you get good service, tip 18-20%. If you get service that's above and beyond, tip more. 15% should be left for mediocre service, less than that for terrible service. It's shocking how quick people are to deduct from the tip, and how reticent they are towards boosting it. Who's naive? This is not an established guideline for patrons of restaurants. Whether it should be, or you would like it to be, is immaterial; it simply is not the established scheme. 15% is considered reasonable by most tipping guides, and more importantly by most patrons, for adequate service with no serious mistakes. I don't mean this to sound rude, but if you don't like that, you can either start a mass media campaign to inform us all on the new rules, or find another line of work that pays better. You cannot, however, expect the ordinary person to 'know' this or follow it; nor can you rightly feel slighted when he does not. [quote] Again in a survey of family and friends 15% is the standard tip for good service. I have never heard of 18% to 20% as the norm. Since NY sales taxes are so damn high (8.625%) to calculate a tip I just double the sales tax which comes out to 17.25% and then round up or down depending on the service.
post #128 of 234
Nightowl, you are starting to irritate me, and I'm not even a delivery driver. A few reasons for tipping pizza guys, from a concerned website: * Every three days, a driver must refill the gas tank. Pizza companies don't pay for gas. Drivers pay for their own. * A driver's car needs an oil change every six weeks. * Every three or four months, new brake pads are needed. * Every four months, tires should be rotated or replaced. A driver gets a flat tire four times a year, mostly from incrementally scraping the tire's side on the street curb. * On an average night, a driver travels 75 to 100 miles on deliveries, averaging four solid hours of drive-time mostly on residential streets. * Of all places to drive, residential driving puts the most wear and tear on a car. All the starting, stopping, and changing of gears is murder on a car. It wears down the brakes in a hurry. Residential driving is even worse than normal city driving. The likelihood of any conceivable car problem is accelerated. * Car insurance does not cover accidents during deliveries. You have to buy special insurance for that, which costs three times as much. Should a driver be in an accident without this special insurance, they have no coverage even by the pizza company. The store covers third party liability only. * A driver travels 25,000 miles a year on the job.
post #129 of 234
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I have never heard of anyone tipping on the before-tax amount and this is in no way standard practice.
Are you kidding? Of course you tip on the before-tax amount. You didn't do anything to earn the sales tax, and you don't get to keep any of it. You just hold it until it gets sent to the state every month. It's almost 9% here, so it would be a significant difference. We don't get to charge profit & overhead fees on the after-tax amount, because no one in his right mind would go for that. Where the hell are you, anyway? I'm starting to think you are just trying out a secret propaganda campaign for servers everywhere...
post #130 of 234
Debaser, Personally, I tip pizza delivery people, so it's not really an issue for me. But to tell me I should tip them because there car needs maintenance from driving and delivering pizzas is ridiculous. Should we supplement their car payment too? Also, I am not sure what the deal is with mom & pop pizza places, but back in college I delivered pizzas for Dominoes. I got payed full minimum wage, not a reduced minimum wage like waiters get, plus I got payed mileage at the end of the night for the use of my car. They payed whatever the government rate is for mileage re-imbursement. So actually the pizza place did put gas in my car and covered some of the wear and tear on the car. I have to say most people tipped when I delivered. Usually it was a dollar plus whatever change was left to round up to the next dollar. For the few who didn't tip I knew there was always someone who was giving me $5 so in the end it all worked out.
post #131 of 234
[quote][quote=Horace,Feb. 14 2005,11:40]
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Originally Posted by nightowl6261a,Feb. 14 2005,08:17
Tokyo, be honest, when you drive, what does your hourly average out to be with tips, mileage etc figured in at the end of each shift, I bet well over $10...and honestly, how many waiters/servers out there count all of the tips at the end of a shift to be taxed by the good ole IRS.
Well see: it helps that WA State has one of the highest minimum wages in the country. So I start with a $7.35 base salary. You are correct that I earn more than $10 an hour ON A BUSY DAY. (11-16 deliveries) But remember, we musn't ignore the fact that I am going through a lot of gas and stacking up the mileage/devaluing my car and requiring more maintenance. On a slow day, I might only deliver 4 pizzas. The average tip for my product is between $3-5, so we'll assume that I made $20 in a shortened (slow day) nine hour shift. That puts me just below ten bucks an hour. But I've never made more than $57 in tips, so on the BEST DAY I've ever had, in 11 hours, I made a little more than $12.00 an hour. If I'm taking 16 deliveries in a day, I'm not the only one there. There is always anywhere from 2-5 drivers working at one time, the other people also taking 10-16 deliveries as well. In other words It's not the goldmine everyone is making it out to be. And in the long run its probably not worth it to drive pizza. I am saving up for my trip in a couple months, and after I come back I will probably quit. I make $14 an hour at Depot, which in itself is not quite enough to pay my bills and eat, so when I come back from Japan loaded with goodies to sell, I'm hoping that will take the place of (and save some wear and tear on my car) than delivering pizza. For a while I'm just REALLY getting sick of working so damn much. I think its driving me crazy.
post #132 of 234
Thread Starter 
Tipping Guidelines All this time, I have been overtipping by tipping on the final bill . . .
post #133 of 234
Man, tipping the "car park attendant" $1 seems like a risky maneuver to me. I mean, if you people are so concerned with spit on your pizza, imagine how a smashed up car might feel.
post #134 of 234
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Are you kidding? Of course you tip on the before-tax amount. You didn't do anything to earn the sales tax, and you don't get to keep any of it. You just hold it until it gets sent to the state every month. It's almost 9% here, so it would be a significant difference. We don't get to charge profit & overhead fees on the after-tax amount, because no one in his right mind would go for that. Where the hell are you, anyway? I'm starting to think you are just trying out a secret propaganda campaign for servers everywhere...
You are socially retarded. If that were true, why does the credit card receipt show ONLY THE TOTAL AMOUNT (not the pre-tax amount), before the blank "tip" line? You're justifying yourself so you can be that much cheaper.
post #135 of 234
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Tipping Guidelines All this time, I have been overtipping by tipping on the final bill . . .
me too.
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