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The Best Classic Shoes for Gentlemen

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
An ongoing review of the history, contribute and I will add to the list below. Good classic gentlemen's shoes are not only an important feature of a formal outfit for the man with a good taste. They can also play an important role in making your first impression on other people - in business or privately. Also, many females with good taste claim to judge men by their shoes - "That is the first thing I look at". Simply speaking, good shoes are an excellent investment. Shoes for formal occasions should normally be black. However, the old saying "no browns after six" has lost a lot of its relevance in recent years with dressing down and a general relaxation of rules, but this still applies to formal evening invitations. The fashion of wearing brown shoes has come from Italy, where light brown shoes are perfectly alright for a dark suit and this has now spread to the rest of the world. However, there are some people who have eccentric habits such as, for example, London star chef Marco Pierre White, who always wears his suede shoes without any socks no matter what the weather is. Formula 1 mogul Bernie Ecclestone prefers to wear his monk shoes with the flap half-open, like a pair of wings. Good classic leather shoes should never be worn two days running so that they can dry and air sufficiently. The leather sole has the advantage of absorbing moisture during the day. For rainy days, one or two pairs of shoes with a thin rubber sole glued to the leather sole will safeguard the shoe and your feet. A proper thick rubber sole will also be good enough for a day in the country.   Apart from some American and continental European shoe brands, it is clearly the English shoe manufacturers, most of them based in Northampton (about one and a half hours north-west of London), who lead the global up-market shoe industry. Northampton has a history of shoe-making going back to Cromwellian times (17th century) and the British Civil War. It was with the help of industrialisation that England became the leading country in the world for classic men's shoes. The below features on the various best international classic shoe manufacturers are in alphabetical order (for bespoke shoes see the book Handmade Shoes for Men). In no particular order, except alpahabetical. Alden: The Alden Shoe Company is a family owned business with a history that now spans four generations of shoe makers. Charles H. Alden founded the Alden Shoe Company in 1884 in Middleborough, Massachusetts. In 1931 when Mr. Alden retired, the remaining shares of the Alden Shoe Company were acquired by the Tarlow family and the factory was moved to Brockton, Massachusetts, and continued production there until 1970, when it was enlarged. Along with producing Goodyear welted men's traditional shoes of extraordinary quality, the research and development of orthopaedic products has contributed greatly to the comfort and fit of Alden's traditional dress footwear. Alden's innovations have been removable golf spikes and the original pattern for the now world-famous 1948 tassel moccasin design.   Price: about USD 300-500 Allen-Edmonds: In 1922, Elbert W. Allen founds the company with the vision to produce shoes that last. William Edmonds joins the company in the 1930s and is responsible for marketing. World War II provides a big boost for Allen-Edmonds as the Army is a big customer and the soldiers become very satisfied customers, many of them for the rest of their lives. In the 1980s, the old factory is destroyed and former head of international sales, John Stollenwerk, takes over from the family as owner and president. This function he still holds today. Allen-Edmonds has always been the ultimate customer experience offering not only the best shoes, but also the best service such as re-crafting of worn-out shoes. Allen-Edmonds considers shoe-making an art: "Every pair is crafted by hand, in a process that includes 212 different production steps, because that's what it takes to make the most comfortable, longest lasting shoes you'll ever wear." Price: about USD 200-310 Berluti: Berluti was founded in 1895 by Alessandro Berluti, who had come to France to establish himself as a craftsman shoemaker. Berluti grew and flourished under the successive guidance of Torello Berluti, Talbinio Berluti and, to the present day, Olga Berluti. Olga Berluti is the creator of the men's shoes which bear her name. In 1993, LVMH acquired the brand with the objective, shared with the creator of Berluti shoes, of assuring global expansion while preserving the soul of the business. In 1996, there was an expansion and renovation of the historical shop in the rue Marbeuf (8th arrondissement) in Paris and the creation by Olga Berluti of five new lines (Tatoués, Guerrier, Dandy, Esprit de la Couture, Lasso) and an infinite variety of colours.  In the same year, Berluti's ready-to-wear workshop at Ferrara, Italy, was acquired, in order to assure development coupled with quality control. Berluti's ambition is to become the international benchmark for truly elegant footwear for men.   Church's: Church's Shoes was founded in 1873 by three brothers who brought together under one roof the cottage industry skills involved in shoe-making at the time. The company's headquarters are still based in Northampton in England. Church's used the same combination of quality craftsmanship and the world's finest leathers to produce the Church English Shoe Collection. The collection of "˜Handmade Custom Grade' shoes offers premier shoes to experience the finest in comfort, quality and style. In a changing world, these classic English styles form a lasting impression. The 250 operations and eight weeks of craftsmanship using the very finest leathers to produce every single pair of shoes for today's well-dressed gentleman is legendary.  Church & Co. still manufacture Church branded footwear at their St James factory in Northampton, which is possibly the largest single unit in Europe manufacturing high quality Goodyear welted shoes. Church also has the ability to satisfy the individual needs of customers who want to make use of "made-to-order" services as well as a first class repair service. Price: about USD 250-600 Crockett & Jones: Crockett & Jones was founded in 1879 in Northampton by Charles Jones and his brother-in-law, James Crockett. Now in its fourth generation, Crockett & Jones remains committed to maintaining the highest standards of traditional craftsmanship, quality and service, which have been appreciated by its customers for more than 100 years. Hand-crafted by the traditional Goodyear-welted manufacturing method using only the finest leathers available, Crockett & Jones shoes have an exceptional combination of comfort, elegance and durability in wear. Each pair takes up to eight weeks to be manufactured, in a highly skilled process involving over 200 separate operations. Crockett & Jones are today renowned throughout the world as being one of Britain's finest shoemakers - well known for their refined style and elegance. Price: about USD 350-650 Ducker & Sons What can I say, made by Grenson, as well as a few other comapnies. Edward Green: IN 1890 EDWARD GREEN began to make hand-crafted shoes for gentlemen in a small factory in Northampton. He soon gained the reputation for making "the finest shoes in England for the discerning few". This reputation was founded on the skill of his craftsmen and his belief in excellence. Today the high standards remain with each pair of Edward Green shoes being mostly handmade, using the finest quality calf. Each pair takes several weeks to make and many craftsmen are involved. George Cleverley: George Cleverley was born on the 10th of August 1898 into a shoemaking family in London. George moved to Colchester in Essex with his parents when he was aged two and spent his childhood selling boot laces and polish. After finishing his apprenticeship at fifteen he was called up into the Army for World War One and was stationed in London before joining an Army boot factory in Calais, France. After the war he joined Tuczek a high society London shoemaker on Clifford Street, Mayfair. He remained with Tuczek for thirty-eight years, managing the shop for many years. George left Tuczek in 1958 to start his own business G.J.Cleverley of 27 Cork Street, Mayfair, London. In Cork Street he furthered his reputation to include some of the most illustrious names in Society and became known for making the Cleverley Shape, a very graceful chisel, toed shoe, which became a signature to his extraordinary craft. George retired from his business in Cork Street in 1976 and moved in with Henry Maxwell in Saville Row. However after two years at Maxwell, he decided that John Carnera and George Glasgow (whom he had known for some years previously) seemed to share the same high principles of shoe making as he understood, and they became in essence his pupils and eventually his successors. Mr. Cleverley's famous customers past and present make an impressive list: Rudolph Valentino, Sir Winston Churchill, Lawrence Olivier, Gary Cooper, Twiggy, Sir John Gielgud, Sir Ralph Richardson, Paul Schofield, Humphrey Bogart, Clark Gable, Charles Laughton,  Robert Morley, Gloria Swanson, Rex Harrison, The Marquess of Tavistock, Edward G. Robinson, Jackie Stewart and Terence Stamp. George died in May 1991 at nearly 93 years of age and was still working virtually until he died. Grenson: The founder, William Green, was born in 1835 and, at the tender age of four, he and his recently widowed mother moved to Rushden in the county of Northamptonshire, in the heart of England. For centuries the county has been recognised as the home of the English shoemaker's art. The reason for this lies in the fact that all the original requirements for the manufacture of leather lay readily to hand: the surrounding forests provided the oak bark and charcoal necessary for tanning; there was an abundance of water for washing the hides (and subsequently providing power); and the grass plains stretching from Warwickshire to East Anglia was a rich source of hides. It was a natural progression that an area which already produced tanned leather should also develop into leather goods manufacturing. However, even in the mid 1800s shoe making was still a cottage industry. Thus, William Green learned his trade helping his mother to handcraft boots at home until 1860 and then in his own house until 1866. The Green family had personal experience of this and so, when William decided in 1866 to become a Factor, he took the unique step of agreeing a formal contract of supply between his shoemakers and the newly formed company of William Green & Son. 350-625 John Lobb: Founded in 1849, Lobb is one of England's oldest makers of bench-made shoes, worn by clients such as King Edward VII (1901-1911, who was Edward, Prince of Wales from 1863-1901), famous 20th century opera tenor Enrico Caruso or actor Daniel Day Lewis. Hermes acquired John Lobb in 1976 and took over everything except the original John Lobb bespoke shoe shop on London's St. James's Street. Whilst the original, family-owned Lobb in St. James's Street still makes shoes one pair at a time, Hermes has broadened the reach of the Lobb brand name through its ready-made shoes. Of all Lobb shoe models the double monk strap William model pictured on the opposite side is the most popular and famous model of all. At Lobb, special care is taken to select the fine leather skins (with crocodile skin shoes for about USD 1500 at the top of the range) and many of the shoes feature topstitching on the vamp and sole. The traditional British stitching on the bottom of the sole is done entirely by hand. The production of each pair of John Lobb shoes is so time-consuming that only about 100 pair of shoes are finished per day. But do not worry about this exclusivity - Lobbs can be found in all Hermes shops around the world. Price: about USD 1200-3500 New & Lingwood: In 1865, New and Lingwood was founded in Eton by Ms. New and Mr. Lingwood, who married later, but the name still stands for excellent service and quality products. This enabled New & Lingwood to gain official status as outfitters to Eton College and has served many generations of Etonians, many of whom come from old aristocratic or just very wealthy families. Since 1922, when New & Lingwood opened a shop in 53 Jermyn Street, old Etonians and other customers alike can enjoy the personal service in London, such as having bespoke shoes made. The range of classic shoes offered by New & Lingwood was significantly extended in 1972, when the old and famous shoes and boot making company Poulsen Skone was acquired. This meant maintaining, if not increasing,  the high standards inherited of making superb classic shoes. Price: about USD 350-650 Ludwig Reiter: Ludwig Reiter was established in 1885 in imperial Vienna by the Bohemian born shoemaker Ludwig Reiter who opened his own workshop. He soon becomes famous for his fine welted boots, which he even delivered to the imperial guards. In 1919, Ludwig Reiter II expanded his father's business with the experience he gained during many years at shoe factories in Europe and in America. In 1934, Ludwig Reiter becomes a factory, producing elegant welted men's and ladies' shoes under the brands "Fox" and "Piccadilly". In the 1980s and the 1990s Ludwig Reiter went through a renaissance, which saw a big expansion of the business. Now there are not only the traditional classic gentleman shoes but also elegant lady shoes under the label of "˜Anna Reiter'.   Price: about USD 350-550 Raymond Massaro: For more than a century, the Massaro establishment has been producing entirely hand-made foot wear. Raymond Massaro is perpetuating this ancestral and mythical renowned trade. He has the privilege of creating shoes for a very refined and exacting clientele. Marlene Dietrich, The Duchess of Windsor and Countess Bismark have been among his three thousands customers. Raymond Massaro is also an orthopedic expert and his many years of experience have allowed him to enter into close human and psychological relationships with his clients sparked with a special kind of dialogue. The world of Haute Couture also provides Raymond Massaro with a very demanding creative market. A large variety of contemporary designers turn to him for their fashion shows. Tricker's: In 1829, Joseph Barltrop and his wife Claire Louise Tricker founded one of the oldest English shoe manufacturers called Tricker Ltd. Five generations later, his family continue to apply the same traditional crafts and skills in the production of the world  renowned Tricker's shoes. Tricker's has a  the Royal warrant from His Royal Highness, the Prince of Wales. But not only Prince Charles but also his sons Prince William and Prince Harry are customers.  The manufacturing home of Tricker's is  Northampton, using the best available materials,  including calf upper leather and oak bark tanned soles. Tricker's craftsmen apply their legendary skills to produce both hand-made and bench-made shoes. Offering a comprehensive selection of classic styles for immediate wear, there is also a handmade bespoke service. This also applies to the best velvet slippers available in England as they are the only ones with leather lining (about USD 140), which you can also order with your own special embroidery design (such as the Guard's Polo Club crest, who are clients).   Price: about USD 400-650 Shoes in the 1800's As late as 1850 most shoes were made on absolutely straight lasts, there being no difference between the right and the left shoe. Breaking in a new pair of shoes was not easy. There were but two widths to a size; a basic last was used to produce what was known as a "slim" shoe. When it was necessary to make a "fat" or "stout" shoe the shoemaker placed over the cone of the last a pad of leather to create the additional foot room needed. Up to 1850 all shoes were made with practically the same hand tools that were used in Egypt as early as the 14th century B.C. as a part of a sandal maker's equipment. To the curved awl, the chisel-like knife and the scraper, the shoemakers of the thirty-three intervening centuries had added only a few simple tools such as the pincers, the lapstone, the hammer and a variety of rubbing sticks used for finishing edges and heels. Efforts had been made to develop machinery for shoe production. They had all failed and it remained for the shoemakers of the United States to create the first successful machinery for making shoes. In 1845 the first machine to find a permanent place in the shoe industry came into use. It was the Rolling Machine, which replaced the lapstone and hammer previously used by hand shoemakers for pounding sole leather, a method of increasing wear by compacting the fibres. This was followed in 1846 by Elias Howe's invention of the sewing machine. The success of this major invention seems to have set up a chain reaction of research and development that has gone on ever since. Today there are no major operations left in shoemaking that are not done better by machinery than formerly by hand. In 1858, Lyman R.Blake, a shoemaker, invented a machine for sewing the soles of shoes to the uppers. His patents were purchased by Gordon McKay, who improved upon Blake's invention. The shoes made on this machine came to be called "McKays." During the Civil War, many shoemakers were called into the armies, thereby creating a serious shortage of shoes for both soldiers and civilians. The introduction of the Mckay was speeded up in an effort to relieve the shortage. Even when McKay had perfected the machines, he found it very difficult to sell them. He was on the point of giving up since he had spent all the money he could spare, when he thought of a new plan. He went back to the shoemakers who had laughed at the idea of making shoes by machinery, but who needed some means of increased production. He told them that he would put the machines in their factories, if they would pay him a small part of what the machine would save on each pair. McKay issued "Royalty Stamps", representing the payments made on the machinemade shoes. This method of introducing machines became the accepted practice in the industry. Mention is made of it because it had two important bearings on the industry. First, shoe manufacturers were able to use machinery without tying up large sums of money. This meant that, in the event a new shoe style suddenly became popular and called for major changes in shoe construction methods and production equipment, the manufacturer wasn't left with a huge investment in machinery made obsolete by these changes - nor with the prospect of further investment for new machines. Second, it developed a type of servive which has proven to be of great value in the shoe nad other industries. This unique service was used in the shoe industry long before it spread to other industries. McKay quickly found that in order to ensure payment for the use of the machines it was necessary to keep them in operation. A machine which wasn't working did not earn any money for Mckay. He therefore made parts interchangeable and organized and trained a group of experts who could be sent wherever machines needed replacement of parts or adjustment. In 1875 a machine for making a different type of shoe was developed. Later known as the Goodyear Welt Sewing Machine, it was used for making both Welt and Turn shoes. These machines became successful under the management of Charles Goodyear, Jr., the son of the famous inventor of the process of vulcanizing rubber. Following McKay's example, Goodyear's name became associated with the group of machinery which included the machines for sewing Welt an Turn shoes and a great many auxiliary machines which were developed for use in connection with them. Invention as a product of continuous research has progressed at an almost incredible pace ever since. This has required great sums of money, sometimes more than a million dollars, to perfect one shoemaking machine, and tireless patience and effort. Inventors have often mechanized hand operations that seemed impossible for any machine. We have progressed along way from the lasting pincer, a simple combination of gripper and lever. For centuries it was the hand shoemaker's only tool for shaping the shoe around the form on which it is made - aided only by his thumbs and tacks, The lasting pincer is a good tool and is still occasionally useful; with it a century ago a man with great effort might form or last a few pair in a long day. Today's automatic toe laster for Goodyear Welt shoes can last 1.200 pairs in an 8-hour day. SHOE HISTORY REFLECTIONS ON POLISHED LEATHER     The Stuart cavaliers--king's men all--that immigrated to America during the Cromwellian Interregnum brought with them their thigh high riding boots...with high heels. Many settled in the south and indeed the bulk of the southern plantation class was descended from cavalier stock; a fact that played a big part in the unfolding of the American Civil War and the pre-eminence of the southern cavalry. Before and after the civil war many southerners emigrated to Texas or went west to escape the devastation of the war. Again their notion of high heels and nobility went with them. And as the new century began, boots became very fashionable, even for women. In 1815, Arthur Wellsley, First Duke of Wellington, defeated Napoleon at Waterloo. In the wake of his victory and his ensuing popularity, Wellington boots became THE style. The major difference in these boots from previous styles was that the heels were low cut and the tops were only calf high. At Northampton there is a pair of dress wellingtons made in 1817. They are a four piece boot--vamp, counter cover, front and back tops--with beaded side seams (the same layout as a modern cowboy boot). The vamps and counter covers are black patent leather, the tops are maroon with an olive top binding and trim...and they have a fancy decorative stitch pattern on the front of the leg. With 1" stacked leather heels and inside canvas pulls they are remarkably like the western boots that later became part of the history of the American frontier. In 1847, S.C. Shive, in America, patented the patterns and crimping board for what we call a Full Wellington--a two piece boot that found wide acceptance among the military, horsemen, and adventurers of the time. By 1868 Wellingtons were almost exclusively an American style, not much seen in a Europe which preferred the Hessian boot. From the 1850's to the 1880's, the full wellington was the boot that military officers were issued. And although by regulation, foot soldiers and enlisted men were issued shoes (ankle high lace-ups--predecessors of the packer), the full wellington was preferred and was the boot that went west with the army and the nation.(see photos) During the Civil War, the Quartermaster Corp. requisitioned supplies from many different civilian contractors. The word shoddy derives from this time and refers to a particular kind of wool cloth made from mill sweepings. This cloth was made into blankets and coats and often fell apart as soon as it got wet. In the same vein, military boot orders were often filled by unscrupulous contractors, as well. This is significant in light of the fact that at the end of the war the federal government had a half million pairs of surplus boots on hand--boots which needed to be disposed of. In the years that followed, troops stationed on the frontier often found that the boots that they were issued fell apart quickly, especially in the severe climate and terrain. Just naturally they turned to nearby civilian makers to replace the defective footwear. This business was to be the foundation of the cowboy boot trade that flourished in the ensuing years. It must be said that during and after the war, the Quartermaster Corp. was deeply involved in testing various designs...from leg heights, to methods of attaching soles, to different types and origins of leather. Many advances in construction and materials were introduced by the military. The leather that was settled upon for construction of the uppers is especially noteworthy. After much experimentation, an oak-tanned Spanish leather which was heavily waxed on the flesh side became the standard. And it was from this waxed calf that most of the early cowboy boots were constructed, as well. By 1870 the standard boot worn by frontier horsemen was, essentially, a variation of military issue. The Coffeyville pattern, as it was called, had a higher Cuban heel (scooped instead of straight in profile); and the front of the boot, despite being basically a full wellington, was often grafted. Indeed, this grafting or piecing of the front of the boot is almost the distinguishing characteristic of many non-military boots. This is not too surprising given that all boots, whether made for military issue or as bespoke (custom) footwear, were made by civilian makers during this time. By the 1880's the cowboy boot, as a separate style, was beginning to emerge. Now we begin to see stovepipe tops, star and horseshoe inlays, stitch patterns and high heels. By 1900 the four piece boot had become the dominant form--probably as a response to the difficulty of construction with a full wellington, an emerging standard of fit that was somewhat more precise than heretofore, and the fact that, historically, the four piece wellington had been reserved for wealthier customers. Styles, of course, did change with the times. Many are the variations of color and decoration. Heights of heel and top have come and gone; and subtle regional variations have also emerged, so that today, for an experienced eye, there is a marked difference in the Texas boot and the northern boot and perhaps, even the Great Basin boot. For those familiar with western boots, there are presently four major variations of the historical cowboy boot. There is the four piece--the dress wellington--which, as we have seen, evolved from the full wellington in the 1800's. Of course, there is the full wellington itself, which is still around and being made by a few custom makers, both in historical and contemporary configurations. In 1887, the military began to issue a different style of boot. Like an English riding boot, they had a seam running up the back of the boot rather than up the side as in the traditional wellington. And in fact, by 1889, the officers boot looked almost identical to the English style. This pattern remained standard issue until the army abandoned the horse and horse units shortly after the 1st World War. During the late 1800's, many prize work competitions were staged to demonstrate that factory workers could not compete with skilled craftsmen. Some of the fanciest and most refined work ever to be done was created for these exhibitions. Ms. Swann tells of coming across boots made in Philadelphia for show that were stitched 64 stitches to the inch. Now just about the finest work that can be done on leather with a modern sewing machine is approximately 30 stitches to the inch. More stitches only tear the leather. Additionally, we know that this work was done by hand. James Devlin says in his book The Guide To The Trade that this work was done with an awl so fine that upon an accidental piercing of his hand, the wound neither hurt nor bled; and that a human hair was used for a needle. And although those working in the trade--the boot and shoemakers--are fewer each year; those who work the bristle and the awl do so under the scrutiny of the ghosts of past masters. Check this out Shoe History and Saints
post #2 of 24
This is a nice summary. Aren't the prices a little off though ? B
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
This is a nice summary. Aren't the prices a little off though ? B
Depending on whether you are speaking of the bespoke shoes or not, and there are a few I did not include because they are specialty brands, like Grenson available mainly under labels and not normally as a branded shoe unless it is a bespoke shoe. Prices could be slightly higher maybe, I was doing a slight run down based on pricing I could find and the history readily available.
post #4 of 24
Hm. Isn't this from one of the Konemann books, either Roetzel or Handmade Shoes for men? Nice little distillate though. Some thoughts: C&J prices are more like $300-$700 nowadays though, the max being the skin-stitched models. Lobb is no longer readily available at Hermes stores. Some may still allow orders for Lobb but my impression is that Hermes is pushing its own-label shoes (which are kind of ugly IMHO). Church's shoes have gotten a good deal more expensive since Prada took over. The last shape somehow appears blockier as well. It's a shame seeing them at Bergdorf Goodman as they really stick out as inferior shoes next to the Lobbs and Kitons. New & Lingwood don't manufacture a single shoe (unless somewhere they are still doing bespoke, which despite their suggestions is dubious). Some of their N&L brand shoes are special designs (like the butterfly-front) made by C&J or Alfred Sargent, but sold at a high markup. The St. James' (f/k/a Poulsen Skone) shoes feature some stock and some special Grenson models. And, of course, there's Vass and Lattanzi, while ernest will inevitably ask about Aubercy.
post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
And, of course, there's Vass and Lattanzi, while ernest will inevitably ask about Aubercy.
Actually it is a list helped along from a collectibles website I have been reading for the last couple of days. Then I had to do a little history run to find some of the information. Please feel free to add on, as to my abilities to search the web are often limited to my lack of education in the truly finer footwear available.
post #6 of 24
What about Green?
post #7 of 24
Quote:
What about Green?
Who?
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Quote:
(Manton @ Feb. 04 2005,14:00) What about Green?
Who?
Edward Green: http://www.edwardgreen.com/ Jon.
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Quote:
(RJMan @ Feb. 04 2005,17:24)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton,Feb. 04 2005,14:00
What about Green?
Who?
Edward Green: http://www.edwardgreen.com/ Jon.
Something tells me he knows. Just a guess.
post #10 of 24
...ensnared in a web of dry wit-- doh.
post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
who? one more time
post #12 of 24
Let's make Chris work.... How about... Alan McAfee George Cleverley Raymond Massaro Tuczek Ducker & Son Enzo Bonafe Bonora Paraboot Georg Materna Balint Albaladejo Joseph Box Dinkelacher Jan Klemann Alfred Sargent
post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
Alfred Sargent ...you see this name, 8 years ago they made some shoes for us that we sold for $139.95, we could not give them away because noone knew who they were, now look at them.
post #14 of 24
Heck, I would be happy if someone could clear up the differences between StefanoBi and Stefano Branchini regarding point of production, ownership, design teams, and which labels they provide subcontracting services (i.e. Berluti).
post #15 of 24
The quoted $1500 for Lobb cocodile shoes seem remarkably cheap.
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