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What do we think about...

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
What are your opinions on a DB navy blazer (yes, with gold buttons )? I love SB blazers but I'm unsure about the DB.
post #2 of 18
Quote:
What are your opinions on a DB navy blazer (yes, with gold buttons   )?  I love SB blazers but I'm unsure about the DB.
Love 'em. The DB is the true or classic blazer. The SB is derivative, and some purists will still maintain that it is incorrect. Just make sure that two front buttons can actually button, i.e., that the button stance is either 6-on-2 or 4-on-2. 6- or 4-on-1 are abominations.
post #3 of 18
DB blazers are certainly good and classic, but I find lately that I almost never wear mine. I wear a SB blazer all the time; it's my default outer garment for anything more formal than a T-shirt and less formal than a suit. But the things for which I would want to wear a blazer qua blazer, most of the time I just end up wearing a suit. Also, my wife hates all DB garments. But that's another topic....
post #4 of 18
Do you guys always keep those DBs buttoned when you march around? What is the etiquette on that?
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Do you guys always keep those DBs buttoned when you march around?  What is the etiquette on that?
Buttoned always when standing. It's permissible to unbutton when sitting, but if the coat fits and is cut well, you shouldn't have to.
post #6 of 18
I've always had 'em. But I think they're better for social functions and a bit much for most offices (I wear mine to the office anyway but then again I'm getting very casual with age).
post #7 of 18
I love 'em too. Just make sure it double vented, otherwise it's not worth it. For fabrication, a very light flannel would be ideal rather than a serge. It's a very sharp item that is versitile as well.
post #8 of 18
My opinions on dB suits for business wear has been pretty well laid out I think, wear them with caution
post #9 of 18
I love my db blazer (a Brooks Brothers). I wear it a lot more than my sb these days. Manton, according to, I believe, Bruce Boyer the single breasted blazer has its origins as a club jacket, thus they were developed in different contexts, but each has its own legitimacy. As a club jacket, the sb breasted blazer were different colors, which we can see from, say, winners of the Masters golf tournament.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Manton, according to, I believe, Bruce Boyer the single breasted blazer has its origins as a club jacket, thus they were developed in different contexts, but each has its own legitimacy. As a club jacket, the sb breasted blazer were different colors, which we can see from, say, winners of the Masters golf tournament.
Not exactly. I assume you are referring to the essay on the blazer in Elegance. Boyer attemtps to unearth the origin of the term "blazer." He cites a possible explanation: the awning striped SB jackets worn to play cricket in the tropics (for example) were so brightly colored that they were said to "blaze." As he points out, this might be true, it might not. But the blazer as we know it -- dark blue doeskin or serge with metal buttons -- is definitely DB in origin. SB blue coats with metal buttons are knock-offs of this.
post #11 of 18
i find it is difficult to find one that really looks 'right,' as in 6x2 DB style, with high-set button stance. the pic in roetzel's book seems to be the most perfect one i've seen yet. actually, if you are a 40 reg and the measurements fit you, you may be interested in this one from brioni-- looks pretty damned sharp to me; may have a minor scratch, but who cares? http://cgi.ebay.com/ws....44&rd=1
post #12 of 18
My own preference is for DB-- and I find that if it is very softly tailored, it looks quite a lot less aggressive than many a SB jacket. I think that for a while, one of Ralph Lauren's divisions was doing a pretty fair knockoff of the Anderson & Sheppard style. Might be worth a try if they're still doing that.
post #13 of 18
I have been thinking of having W.W. Chan make me a DB navy blazer with BLACK metal buttons. My thinking is that it would look considerably less nautical and flashy than brass buttons, especially since I am a fairly large, imposing man anyway. Any thoughts on this?
post #14 of 18
my RL DB blue blazer, w/ white doeskin flannel trousers
post #15 of 18
Quote:
I have been thinking of having W.W. Chan make me a DB navy blazer with BLACK metal buttons. My thinking is that it would look considerably less nautical and flashy than brass buttons, especially since I am a fairly large, imposing man anyway. Any thoughts on this?
I saw a picture of a blazer fan in one of the lifestyle mags-- Town and Country, perhaps-- who opined exactly as you are thinking, that brass buttons were too flashy to be effective in the evening. He used the black bakelite jobs with anchors, which I think you can see on Benson & Clegg's website, under nautical buttons. I'm becoming inclined to agree. My only DB navy blazer in use now has somewhat textured brass buttons, which softens the effect a bit. Anyway, black buttons have potential, and I might go that way for my next one. I do need a summer-only blazer, and dark buttons might be a nice touch-- sort of like yacht club officer's jackets. One halfway step would be bronze buttons. If you're worried about being imposing, I would also make sure that Chan doesn't build up the shoulders too much. The only suit they've made for me was very well made and fit perfectly. But I can't wear the jacket because I look like a gangster in it. This was partly my fault for not having an effective conversation with them at the start, but I've heard on this board and others from Chan clients that they will allow more shoulder padding than other tailors might put in with the same instructions. Get the shoulders right, and you can get away with flashier buttons.
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