or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Home Entertaining
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Home Entertaining - Page 3

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Personally I really like Ghiardelli (sp), although I do like Lindt, Droste, and Milka as well, I prefer a nice ghiardelli.  I guess there's no accounting for taste.
I think Ghirardelli suits American palates. Some of my friends grew up on Hershey's chocolate, and that is what they prefer. When you start doing taste comparisons, I think the difference is fairly obvious. Ghirardelli is bland. You barely taste the cocoa.
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Quote:
(Fabienne @ Feb. 08 2005,17:36) We pretty much agree.  You can get Parmigiano-Reggiano at a reasonable price at Trader Joe's if you live near one.  It's still nothing like the ones I have tasted in Italy.  They are so hard, I can barely grate those.
That's because the real stuff is properly--and tastes astounding when--crumbled instead of grated.   Celemtine pudding?  Does that even work? Tom
Well, apparently not Anna: she had me grate the parmesan she brought me from Sicily with no respect for the ends of my fingers... I know you can use the ends (crust) of this type of parmesan to flavor your tomato sauce. I have no idea how the Clementine conconction was supposed to taste. She blamed the citrus. Then my corn starch. She kept shaking her head, saying: "Such a shame, it is so refreshing in the summer."
post #33 of 51
I was referring primarily to milk chocolate. I enjoy the occasional 70% Lindt as well, but I'm primarily a milk chocolate fan. I dislike Hershey's with a passion though, I like swiss Nestle though (not the stuff sold in the US)
post #34 of 51
Quote:
I have no idea how the Clementine conconction was supposed to taste.  She blamed the citrus.  Then my corn starch.  She kept shaking her head, saying: "Such a shame, it is so refreshing in the summer."
LOL. I can completely picture this. I'm sure it tasted just fine to you, if not superlative. I can, however, empathize with something just...not...working. It can be hard to get your exact taste across without the right ingredients. Which in Germany, means almost always... I'm a milk chocolate guy too. Damn that Hersheys... Tom
post #35 of 51
I never had any problems getting any ingredients in Germany, but then I did live in Dusseldorf, with some amazing shops. I rarely bought food in either the NAAFI or PX; both full of processed crap.
post #36 of 51
During my 6 months or so in Vienna, it was extraordinarily easy to get good food products in a city full of premium supermarkets and open air markets. Great place to get meat at nice butcher shops (although not steaks, its damn near impossible to get a good one in Europe)
post #37 of 51
Ingredients available in IO, Germany, especially this time of year: OK sausage bad sausage OK onions bad onions bad fish fish you wouldn't...well, you know. There may be some great gemstones here, but you still can't get a good steak/lemon/orange/tomato. I will give credit for consistently fresh basil and flat-leaf parsley, which is hard to find back home. Tom
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Ingredients available in IO, Germany, especially this time of year: OK sausage bad sausage OK onions bad onions bad fish fish you wouldn't...well, you know. There may be some great gemstones here, but you still can't get a good steak/lemon/orange/tomato.  I will give credit for consistently fresh basil and flat-leaf parsley, which is hard to find back home. Tom
when does the white asparagus start? isn't it just about now? I liked the breads/baked goods, cured meats, cheeses that were available in germany. the game meats available in stores, of course the beer, there were, in Dusseldorf at the time, some great ethnic stores (although actually that was just japanese and what they liked to eat). the funny thing is, though, that you get used to something in just a certain way. Hummus is about the simplest food in the world, it includes chickpeas, olive oil and seasonings. but getting it "right" is very difficult. we used to eat hummus from one specific place, and we looked for a while to find good hummus after moving to the states. not that their aren't hundreds of perfectly good humuses out there, just we wanted to find one jsut like we like it.
post #39 of 51
If you're into mass produced chocolate, give Cote D'or a try. It's Belgium's Hershey's. Not bad. Last time when I was in Liege, I spent a lot of time going to different chocolatiers. Over here in Canada a truffle of comparable quality will cost you $10-$15. There it is a lot more common.
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Quote:
(kabert @ Feb. 03 2005,09:34) Excepting things like bread/biscuits, the ONLY meals during the year that we have platters/bowls of food that are passed around the table are Christmas, Thanksgiving and Easter dinner.  If there are alot of people or kids involved, sometimes we do a buffet, but all 1-3 couple dinners (other than casual pizza/take-out of course) involve my wife putting together nice plates for everyone.  That's just the way we've always done things.  BTW, my wife is definitely in the foodie category.
I hesitate to prepare plates for people, as I feel I may be imposing amounts and choices. I guess I learned a new term.  Foodie.  I don't think that's me, though.  I cook as I breathe, it's integrated into our lives, I don't make a big deal of it.  I could cook with my eyes closed, or make something out of whatever is left in the refrigerator.  That's not being a foodie, is it?
The term foodie is one that I hear more and more and like less and less.
post #41 of 51
globetrotter-- I do love the idea of some of the local treats, but out here in the middle of nowhere the favorite beer is Kirner Pils or various hefeweizsens (too fruity for me, don't understand why so many Americans love it), the favorite sausage is stringy, and the only local product is bad wine from the Nahe valley. I will give credit to the bakeries for being surprisingly good, and the Mosel and Rhein are wonderful in the spring and summer for lounging with a bottle of wine. There's also a damn good Thai place up the road. Other than that, I'm hurting. I have a shipment of San Marzano tomatoes on its way from the States, thank goodness. Tom
post #42 of 51
have you made it to munich and/or dussledorf yet? both have pretty good local foods. I was in karslruhe any number of times, which I believe is not far from where you are, and yes, I can't remember anything that great there to eat. I used to love the various sausages and hard salamis available, the baked goods and the beer, but when I was in germany I would always be traveling out on a regular basis and have access to more seasoned foods. do you ever have alt? that is my idea of beer
post #43 of 51
Alt is almost there, but for what I have readily available, I prefer schwartzbier along the lines of Kostritzer. But for me the darker the better; I love a good (cold) Guinness. As for Munich...if I had known a couple of years ago what I know now, I would have been pushing to get stationed in Bavaria. Great food, great beer, extremely friendly, and they still manage to keep a good portion of Oktoberfest non-commercialized. Guys hanging out in lederhosen on a random Friday night in July just because that's what they do--nothing ironic or touristy about it. If I were Bavarian I wouldn't want to be associated with the rest of the country either. Tom
post #44 of 51
Quote:
 But for me the darker the better; I love a good (cold) Guinness.  
I half have to agree here, I love a good dark beer, but prefer my Guinness at room temp....you must try tapist though, when in Belgium it is the only thing I drink.
post #45 of 51
Quote:
Alt is almost there, but for what I have readily available, I prefer schwartzbier along the lines of Kostritzer.  But for me the darker the better; I love a good (cold) Guinness.  As for Munich...if I had known a couple of years ago what I know now, I would have been pushing to get stationed in Bavaria.  Great food, great beer, extremely friendly, and they still manage to keep a good portion of Oktoberfest non-commercialized.  Guys hanging out in lederhosen on a random Friday night in July just because that's what they do--nothing ironic or touristy about it.  If I were Bavarian I wouldn't want to be associated with the rest of the country either. Tom
yeah, I hit octoberfest every year for about 10 years, I'd always find some reason to be in western europe at the right time. For a few years one of my customers had a table in one of the good tents so I knew I had a good place, as well. if you keep your eyes open, there are smaller festivlas like that all over germany. take care
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Home Entertaining