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Reversible?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I have this black jacket from Ann Taylor that is showing some wear at the collar (edges, along the seam).  It has gotten a little paler black, if that makes any sense.  Is there anything I can do? The suit is triacetate. It looks a lot like this:
post #2 of 8
Abrasion causes this problem (where collar rubs against your neck) and is particularly problematic with dark cashmere. My tailor knew of no cure (including reversing or changing the coat collar), and so I've given the coat away. I had thought that the coat could be somehow pressed differently to hide the discoloration. No dice.
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Abrasion causes this problem (where collar rubs against your neck) and is particularly problematic with dark cashmere. My tailor knew of no cure (including reversing or changing the coat collar), and so I've given the coat away. I had thought that the coat could be somehow pressed differently to hide the discoloration. No dice.
I guess I didn't explain well enough. I meant that the lapels are actually more defined on the edges, because they are lighter in color. No miracle, huh? I really like the jacket, but I guess it has served its time. I'm wearing the suit today, and noticed it when I looked in the mirror.
post #4 of 8
I had a similar experience a few years ago with a suit from Banana Republic. It was black crepe wool, and after a few dry cleanings began to show wear on the tips of the lapel and at the cuff. I used a black permanent marker on these areas. However, once the thing started deforming under the pressure of dry cleanings (it was a fused garment, as are Ann Taylor's jackets), it went to Goodwill. I anticipate a similar experience with my black suit made by Armani, so spending more on a garment is not a solution either (Armani is also fused, somewhat like BR and Ann Taylor).
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I had a similar experience a few years ago with a suit from Banana Republic.  It was black crepe wool, and after a few dry cleanings began to show wear on the tips of the lapel and at the cuff.  I used a black permanent marker on these areas.  However, once the thing started deforming under the pressure of dry cleanings (it was a fused garment, as are Ann Taylor's jackets), it went to Goodwill.  I anticipate a similar experience with my black suit made by Armani, so spending more on a garment is not a solution either (Armani is also fused, somewhat like BR and Ann Taylor).
My jacket isn't fused, btw. It is a few years old, so maybe they have changed their standards. I was thinking about something along the lines of the permanent marker idea.
post #6 of 8
The marker trick can sometimes work with black fabrics. The real trick is to avoid the drycleaner like the plague and brush and steam your clothes as often as possible. That will keep your blacks black. The problem is that most women don't have the patience for this, or find it beneath them as a result of some lingering feminist defensiveness. My girlfriend's drycleaning bills are bigger than my car payments as a result.
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
The marker trick can sometimes work with black fabrics. The real trick is to avoid the drycleaner like the plague and brush and steam your clothes as often as possible. That will keep your blacks black. The problem is that most women don't have the patience for this, or find it beneath them as a result of some lingering feminist defensiveness. My girlfriend's drycleaning bills are bigger than my car payments as a result.
OK, I might attempt the marker. I am attached to this suit. It was probably dry-cleaned 3 times over 5 years. Your post reminds me I should probably look into getting clothes brushes.
post #8 of 8
Yea,and remember,if it must be dry cleaned,insist on gentle hand pressing only.Nothing can ruin black quicker than a careless pressing by machine.Too much heat & pressure melts the fabric and creates that highlighted seam around the lapels and pockets.I fear that's what you're describing.Furthermore,black is not highly stable and color loss occurs at stresspoints on a suit or jacket.I have a beautiful Louis overcoat with the same problem.A little black marker and remember to have an old piece of terry cloth to blot if it goes on too heavy.
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