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Differences between English and Italian shirts - Page 2

post #16 of 24
Classic American Shirt:
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Classic American Shirt:
My...Mr. Kabbaz...You seem to have outdone yourself on this one... Did you get help?
post #18 of 24
If you want to know of American shirts, the Troy Shirtmakers Guild made shirts of excellent materials, cut and construction. I am hesitant to add Sulka because of the Sulka-labeled crap from its last several years of existence.
post #19 of 24
Quote:
What exactly is meant by 'roll' here? Does it refer to the part where the collar flap is attached to the body of the shirt or the outer edge of the collar flap?
I think it was a reference to how the collars lie against your chest. British collars typically are straight and stiff and will meet your chest at their points. Italian ones often curve gently to meet the chest and the last inch or so will lie flat against it. It can be very flattering IMO. B
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Italian fused collars
Fused Collars? No shirt I have, has a fused collar, and all of them are Italian.
post #21 of 24
Sorry Giona, reading some of your old posts I see that you have your shirts custom-made. I was describing the majority of RTW Italian shirts, in particular those which make their way to the American market.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Classic American Shirt:
Are U a deadhead? How do you make horchkess (sp?) fabrics and vege burritos go together? -
post #23 of 24
Quote:
What exactly is meant by 'roll' here? Does it refer to the part where the collar flap is attached to the body of the shirt or the outer edge of the collar flap?
Well, this is hard to put into words. The visible part of the collar is called the "leaf." That is, it is the part the folds down over the band. Imagine that you are looking straight-on at a shirt that is buttoned up with a knotted tie is in place. Let us, for the purposed of this discussion, call the two visible triangles on each side of the tie knot the collar's "blades." (I happen to know that this is not a real term, because Alex Kabbaz told me so. But it may be useful to us.) Now, the blades each have a front edge: the edge that goes from the collar band at the top of the knot down to the point. On a collar with no roll, that edge will be straight. "Roll" means that it will have a gentle curve, sort of like a tilde (~) tilted at a 45 degree angle, but less pronounced.
post #24 of 24
FIH Ties
Quote:
My...Mr. Kabbaz...You seem to have outdone yourself on this one... Did you get help?
Only with the ironing.
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