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Clothing and life

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
What is the meaning of clothing for you? In what ways has it shaped your life - for better and for worse? Have you ever thought how your life would have been if you dressed differently? Has clothing helped you overcome your own limitations in the eyes of others? At what point in your life did it occur to you the importance of dressing well? Has the way you dress impacted your personality? Has the way you dress influenced your circle of friends? Do you have any regrets?
post #2 of 22
being well dressed is a way to look like more professional, more serious, more wealthy in order to obtain easily what you want from others
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
being well dressed is a way to look like more professional, more serious, more wealthy in order to obtain easily what you want from others
dug: Are there instances when you suspected that you were treated better or worse because of the way you dress?
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
What is the meaning of clothing for you? In what ways has it shaped your life - for better and for worse? Have you ever thought how your life would have been if you dressed differently? Has clothing helped you overcome your own limitations in the eyes of others? At what point in your life did it occur to you the importance of dressing well? Has the way you dress impacted your personality? Has the way you dress influenced your circle of friends? Do you have any regrets? On a related note: The Ugly Truth About Beauty http://abcnews.go.com/sections/2020/...sm_020823.html Do Looks Really Matter? http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3917414/
post #5 of 22
Frankly, I think being poorly dressed and groomed can hurt more than being superbly dressed/groomed can help. That is, in my view, being poorly dressed and groomed can bring you down socially and professionally to a greater extent than being superbly well-dressed and groomed can raise you up. (The starting point on the scale being, I suppose, someone wearing Dockers khakis and a blue oxford ....) No, I don't have any proof for this hypothesis -- just my seat of the pants theory based on experience.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Frankly, I think being poorly dressed and groomed can hurt more than being superbly dressed/groomed can help.  That is, in my view, being poorly dressed and groomed can bring you down socially and professionally to a greater extent than being superbly well-dressed and groomed can raise you up.
I can buy that.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Okay, let me share my personal story Now, looking back, I realized that my father and mother were both sharp dressers. My father had a particular fondness for Dunhill items, and since he does not wear cufflinks and ties often anymore, he handed his cufflinks and ties to me. I remember my dad once complaining that the shirt he was examining did not have matching patterns on the shoulder and sleeve. Back then, I thought that his comment was ridiculous. On the other hand, growing up, I seriously could care less about how I looked -- dressing and grooming. My parents literally had to beg me for the privillege of buying me new clothes when we go shopping. Looking back, I think I really didn't care because I was fairly satisfied with my life (I got what I wanted -- which were not much anyway as I was neither ambitious nor greedy), and I could rely on my parents for their social connections. I went to a school which required uniforms. I didn't have to impress anyone. Having moved to a foreign land for college, my perception changed rather drastically. I am on my own. I now have bigger goals for myself. I work hard and I try to cultivate positive attributes. It makes no sense to me that I should exclude clothing and grooming. On any particular day, the treatment I receive from everyone --strangers AND friends--is noticably different depending on how well I dress. It is remarkable. Also, in certain circles, some individuals will simply refuse to deal with you (beyond superficial levels) if you are not well-attired. Buttoned the last button of your suit jacket? Wore a shiny dark blue DKNY shirt under a suit to a conference? Your'e out. Every now and then I see beautiful men and women wearing ugly clothing and I say to myself: what a pity. They could become so much more. Clothing and grooming are relatively cheap investments that one can make to better oneself. It brings you pleasure, and brings pleasure to those who deal with you. So why not?
post #8 of 22
I love clothing because it can say a bit about your personality. It's another type of communication. Dressing up for an occasion always looks nice as well, because you want to look like you care about what you're doing. Dressing nice when you're around your friends shows that you care about being with your friends. As far as beauty culture and such goes... I couldn't hate it more. It's really frustrating how depressed or upset people get over their body. I try to stay clear of the notion that how I look (excluding style) has any bearing on my ability to go places in life that I wish to go.
post #9 of 22
Once I was wearing beat up jeans and a CGBG t-shirt on the streetcorner (nice belt though), and a stranger put a couple of quarters into my coffee. Another time, I was dressed in a corduroy suit (uniform of the proletariat lover), and I gave a homeless guy dollar. Lastly, I was wearing a pinstriped navy suit (Cesar Attolini) with a lavender shirt (Borrelli MTM) with a Brioni tie (fancy.) and I kicked that homeless guy. Or rather, I asked my chaffeur to kick him with with Kenneth Coles (ugh) because I didn't want to get my Lattanzis dirty. That was worth a dollar.
post #10 of 22
LAGUY, you've gotta post pix of some of your stuff. I haven't seen an actual cesare attolini yet, although I'm fond of my sartoria suit-- probably not much of a comparison. Myself, I guess my clothing choices are a direct result of my military experience; having spent many months of my (last) career in desert camoflague on an army cot in the middle east, I have really grown to like fine clothing, excellent tailoring/ hand-stitched buttonholes, etc. Also, I like the confidence and self-assuredness that comes from wearing a Brioni sportcoat or suit; it's almost a suit of armor against the outside world-- in the course of my work currently, I do make mistakes and make suggestions (some great, some not so great)-- but when I'm criticized, I have to say I derive personal satisfaction in thinking "yes, but when it all comes down to it, I'm the one in the room wearing the three thousand dollar suit." Vain, but it works.
post #11 of 22
Quote:
it's almost a suit of armor against the outside world
FOXX--I really enjoyed your "suit of armor" comment. I attribute my interest in clothing to my father who insisted that the best way to show respect to others is to dress neatly at all times.  (No one could shine a pair shoes like my dad.)
post #12 of 22
Quote:
I attribute my interest in clothing to my father who insisted that the best way to show respect to others is to dress neatly at all times.  (No one could shine a pair shoes like my dad.)
I agree with your father's viewpoint. It is why I choose to dress nicely -- to show respect.
post #13 of 22
the chicks dig it
post #14 of 22
Quote:
LAGUY, you've gotta post pix of some of your stuff.  I haven't seen an actual cesare attolini yet, although I'm fond of my sartoria suit-- probably not much of a comparison.  
Ummm... I think he was joking about the whole kicking the homeless guy, and I highly doubt that he owns a couderoy suit. The first entry though... now that's believable. I have a similar story, in that I came home one weekend from school in my beat-to-hell PDC jeans and my dad concerned says, "Mike, you doing ok? You need some money, do you have enough to feed yourself?" If he only knew what those jeans cost, lol. He also doesn't know that HE'S the one who paid for them....
post #15 of 22
"suit of armor..." I like that. Style is class. Not class as in rich, poor, etc. but you have to respect someone who dresses respectfully. Fashion has nothing to do with class (Paris Hilton, anyone?), but a man of style is a man who changes his surroundings with each step. Looking good, confident, classic... it's just something else.
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