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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 343

post #5131 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post
Interesting. Post up the recipe if you've got a link. I'm curious to see what's going with that.
Cook legs at 64 C for 17 hours. Take out of a bag and then let them dry out a bit in the fridge. Dredge in a 2-1 mixture of flour and trisol seasoned with hot smoked paprika and piment d'espelette, then dip in buttermilk and back in the flour mixture. Then fry in peanut oil at 350 F for about 8 minutes, or until they are nice and brown
post #5132 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Cook legs at 64 C for 17 hours. Take out of a bag and then let them dry out a bit in the fridge. Dredge in a 2-1 mixture of flour and trisol seasoned with hot smoked paprika and piment d'espelette, then dip in buttermilk and back in the flour mixture. Then fry in peanut oil at 350 F for about 8 minutes, or until they are nice and brown
Questions: A) you're cooking them in the oven inside a bag? b) what the hell is trisol? c) you think you could substitute anything for the piment?
post #5133 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post
Questions: A) you're cooking them in the oven inside a bag? b) what the hell is trisol? c) you think you could substitute anything for the piment?
1) In a water bath, not an oven. 2) It is some sort of wheat based product which makes things crispier. 3) Cayenne or more paprika. I would have used cayenne, but I didn't have any at home.
post #5134 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Cook legs at 64 C for 17 hours. Take out of a bag and then let them dry out a bit in the fridge. Dredge in a 2-1 mixture of flour and trisol seasoned with hot smoked paprika and piment d'espelette, then dip in buttermilk and back in the flour mixture. Then fry in peanut oil at 350 F for about 8 minutes, or until they are nice and brown
There was a place in San Anselmo (I used to live there), AVA, that had fried chicken on the menu and I always suspected they cooked the chicken sous vide before frying it. It had a really unusual tenderness that I'd never experienced with conventional fried chicken. I've been thinking of trying to fry some using that technique. I have a SVS and I think I'm gonna try it. Where did you get the trisol?
post #5135 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolpapaboze View Post
There was a place in San Anselmo (I used to live there), AVA, that had fried chicken on the menu and I always suspected they cooked the chicken sous vide before frying it. It had a really unusual tenderness that I'd never experienced with conventional fried chicken. I've been thinking of trying to fry some using that technique. I have a SVS and I think I'm gonna try it. Where did you get the trisol?
Too bad you don't live there anymore. I have a ten pound bucket of the stuff, and fry food like once a month. I got it online, don't remember where. It is really expensive, and only comes in massive quantities, but the difference is incredible. The food you fry stays crisp forever. I was nibbling on chicken two hours after dinner and it hadn't softened.
post #5136 of 25885
A Margherita pizza at Una Pizza Napoletana.

Easily now the best pizza in SF. Very much like in Naples.

Better than Tony's and Delfina's. Now another reason never to go to Flour and Water again.

Place is a bit stark though.
post #5137 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Too bad you don't live there anymore. I have a ten pound bucket of the stuff, and fry food like once a month. I got it online, don't remember where. It is really expensive, and only comes in massive quantities, but the difference is incredible. The food you fry stays crisp forever. I was nibbling on chicken two hours after dinner and it hadn't softened.
If you recall where to get the trisol ever please pm that sounds incredible. To clarify you cook the chicken at 64C sous vide for 17 hrs? Hardcore and since I have access to a vacuum seal machine (Roomate's) I must try this. Before I start googling for trisol and piment is piment tricky to source? I may just substitute cayenne but since I need to locate some trisol anyways.... Bam: http://www.tienda.com/food/products/te-18.html but sold out. Other sources appreciated!
post #5138 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abraxis View Post
If you recall where to get the trisol ever please pm that sounds incredible. To clarify you cook the chicken at 64C sous vide for 17 hrs? Hardcore and since I have access to a vacuum seal machine (Roomate's) I must try this. Before I start googling for trisol and piment is piment tricky to source? I may just substitute cayenne but since I need to locate some trisol anyways.... Bam: http://www.tienda.com/food/products/te-18.html but sold out. Other sources appreciated!
The piment is easy to find. I might have spelled it wrong. Just use cayenne, though. Yeah, that is right 17 hours @ 64.
post #5139 of 25885
Thanks for the tips Matt. Sounds delicious but way too much work for me.
post #5140 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
What is anchovy stock and where can I get some?

it's these:


steeped in water, sometimes with a length of kombu. Korean alternative to katsuobushi for making dashi.
post #5141 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
1) In a water bath, not an oven.
2) It is some sort of wheat based product which makes things crispier.
3) Cayenne or more paprika. I would have used cayenne, but I didn't have any at home.

What is a water bath and how do you keep the temperature constant?
post #5142 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
What is this shrimp doing on the plate? Veal, jus, potato/parmesan cake, pea puree... OK... now a shrimp ?

I have nothing against meat & seafood combinations but this is not something that makes much sense to me.

alright, but it's not weird or so...
post #5143 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobro View Post
What is a water bath and how do you keep the temperature constant?

A water bath is a water oven, basically an appliance that is a container of water that can be kept at a constant temperature. Restaurants use an immersion circulator, which is a tub with a heating element and a device that circulates the water to keep the temperature constant across the vessel. Last year a device came on the market for home cooks, the Sous Vide Surpreme. I have one of these. You vacuum seal the protein, in this case chicken, in a food grade plastic bag, set the temperature of the water, then use a rack in the oven to keep the chicken submerged for however long you want to cook it. It's a really versatile way to cook lots of things with results that can be dramatically different than direct heat methods.
post #5144 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
What is anchovy stock and where can I get some?

i think, it belongs to this stuff
post #5145 of 25885
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Cook legs at 64 C for 17 hours. Take out of a bag and then let them dry out a bit in the fridge. Dredge in a 2-1 mixture of flour and trisol seasoned with hot smoked paprika and piment d'espelette, then dip in buttermilk and back in the flour mixture. Then fry in peanut oil at 350 F for about 8 minutes, or until they are nice and brown
Sounds lovely, always wanted to try sous vide but afraid of fucking it up and ending up killing my kids.
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