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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 242

post #3616 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Tonight, we made ramen. Tonkotsu, to be exact.


Nice work, Kwilk!! And many thanks for the pictorial. Everything looks great but you really want that egg to be more runny...6 to 7 minutes is best.

I had a tonkotsu with some pork belly in it recently that was sublime.
post #3617 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alter View Post
Nice work, Kwilk!! And many thanks for the pictorial. Everything looks great but you really want that egg to be more runny...6 to 7 minutes is best.
I know. My stupid mistake. I don't cook very often at home, and the way we do it at work is 8 minutes boiling, 8 minutes no heat, then ice bath. So when I did the 8 minutes boiling and then turned the stove off, the electric range took too long to cool down and overcooked them. Doh.

Whenever I've had tonkotsu it has had pork belly or pork loin. Obviously, I enjoy the belly more . I have some pork belly. Should have made it, but didn't want to add another braise on top of what I was already doing.

I bet a 63 degree egg on top of ramen would be incredible.
post #3618 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Tonight, we made ramen. Tonkotsu, to be exact.

The process takes about a day and a half, unless you're one of those people who always has some kind of stock on hand. Yesterday morning, I got the pork stock started.
I chose trotters for the initial stock b/c they have such great gelatinous quality. So much collagen. Maybe a more traditional French food guy like SField, Manton, or Matt would hate me for it, but I like to use them in stock.
In this initial stock goes pork trotters (not roasted), water, onion, garlic, leek, ginger peel, and konbu. I let this summer for about 10 hours to get a pretty good white pork stock.

Trotters:


Veg:


Stock going:


It turns out pretty nicely.


Then, I let that cool and put it in the fridge. This morning, I roasted off pork shanks-- chose shanks because I wanted the really great flavor and didn't need to add a whole lot of body for the secondary stock.

Shanks:


The stock obviously needs skimmed the entire time it is going. After about 8 hours with the shanks, it has great body and great pork flavor. I start to turn it from a stock into a ramen broth by adding some green onion bottoms and more ginger peel, and at this point I begin to salt it.


That's basically it. Plate it with the noodles first, and then whatever you want with it. This time, I chose hard-boiled eggs, some japanese spice mix, green onion, pickled ginger, and a dot of sriracha. The dish needs a lot of work to become more visually appealing, but the flavor honestly just could not be any better.




Oh, and here's a shot of the ginger used for pickled ginger:


It is harvested young and still has an enzyme that reacts with oxygen during the pickling process, which is why it turns pink. Most places dye it pink with food coloring, but the stuff we made was all natural.

There you have it. It makes sense why someone like Alter wouldn't make it at home. It was about 20 hours worth of work, although most of that work is relatively easy, just spent skimming the stock. But when I'm somewhere that has good ramen, I wouldn't make it at home. It's so cheap and so good out. However, it is possible to make at home and this turned out really well.

Looking good, chef. But WTF is this "japanese spice mix" you speak of? If the stock is delicious, why do you need to add a spice mix to it?
post #3619 of 25354
had some chin ma-ya ramen yesterday, that stuff is amazing.
post #3620 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
Looking good, chef. But WTF is this "japanese spice mix" you speak of? If the stock is delicious, why do you need to add a spice mix to it?

I added the mix b/c it tasted good? I don't know. It was just like adding sriracha. Just some heat. It's basically Shichimi tōgarashi
It was this crap:



I see this product at most ramen houses around here.
post #3621 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
I added the mix b/c it tasted good? I don't know. It was just like adding sriracha. Just some heat. It's basically Shichimi tōgarashi

Yup, that is shichimi. Basically red pepper, with some mandarin orange peel, sesame seed, poppy seed, hemp seed, nori (looked it up on wiki)

Usually available at most ramen shops at the table to add if you like it.
post #3622 of 25354
ok kwik, next time you are in town I am buying you another beer. that was a great post. I am never going to do that at home, but very cool to see.
post #3623 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alter View Post
Yup, that is shichimi. Basically red pepper, with some mandarin orange peel, sesame seed, poppy seed, hemp seed, nori (looked it up on wiki)

Usually available at most ramen shops at the table to add if you like it.
It is a very interesting mix. I didn't realize it had those different things. You can definitely taste the fruitiness over the heat, which I imagine is the orange peel.
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
ok kwik, next time you are in town I am buying you another beer. that was a great post. I am never going to do that at home, but very cool to see.


Really, it's easy to do. Almost all of the work was "set it and forget it" kind of shit. Easier than a good risotto!
post #3624 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
I added the mix b/c it tasted good? I don't know. It was just like adding sriracha. Just some heat. It's basically Shichimi tōgarashi
It was this crap:



I see this product at most ramen houses around here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alter View Post
Yup, that is shichimi. Basically red pepper, with some mandarin orange peel, sesame seed, poppy seed, hemp seed, nori (looked it up on wiki)

Usually available at most ramen shops at the table to add if you like it.

I think I need to get a hold of this. It sounds like something that would do wonders for my udon packet noodles.
post #3625 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
I think I need to get a hold of this. It sounds like something that would do wonders for my udon packet noodles.

You do. Better on udon than on ramen, actually. I find that a good ramen doesn't really need the heat.
post #3626 of 25354
Was up visiting my parents the other day and picked a bunch of golden chanterelles. Sauteed the mushrooms and used the liquid with a little pasta water and butter to make a sauce. Had them with smoked duck sausage and garlic over pasta.
I'm going up again this weekend, I think I'll look for some blacks.


post #3627 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
ok kwik, next time you are in town I am buying you another beer. that was a great post. I am never going to do that at home, but very cool to see.
actually, and I know people will heap shit on me for this, but as one of The Older Guys around here (at the stately age of thirtyfuckingthree) it's been really great to watch the way Kyle has come on professionally. From the lost chubby kid from hicktown that first joined, to culinary school kid who clearly really had a passion for what he was doing that I think even he was surprised by, to where he is at now, working in one of the top restaurants in the land. It's really cool to watch someone - admittedly even via the internet from a couple hemispheres away - discover something they are passionate about and mature in their field. Seriously kiddo, congratulations and good luck with it.
post #3628 of 25354
fuck, I'm supposed to be on a diet, I shouldn't be reading this thread
post #3629 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T View Post
actually, and I know people will heap shit on me for this, but as one of The Older Guys around here (at the stately age of thirtyfuckingthree) it's been really great to watch the way Kyle has come on professionally.

From the lost chubby kid from hicktown that first joined, to culinary school kid who clearly really had a passion for what he was doing that I think even he was surprised by, to where he is at now, working in one of the top restaurants in the land.

It's really cool to watch someone - admittedly even via the internet from a couple hemispheres away - discover something they are passionate about and mature in their field.

Seriously kiddo, congratulations and good luck with it.

Can one be a couple of hemispheres away? Or by definition aren't they back on the same hemisphere?

K
post #3630 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
To hold me over while making the stock: fresh baguette, Cowgirl Creamery Mt. Tam, Cypress Grove Fog Lights, some local chorizo, and local Sopressata, and some local country pate w/ black peppercorns. Life is good.

I'm lucky enough to be close to a cowgirl creamery location. Red Hawk

Last night I made chicken and cashews at home. Chopped chicken thighs seasoned healthily with salt and pepper, quickly browned; chopped bell peppers, scallions, ginger, and garlic sauteed in a little oil, add a little chicken stock, little soy (and a little cornstarch), thicken, serve with short grain brown rice. No vis.
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