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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 3

post #31 of 25454
Nothing wrong with your dinner, Bradford. I have to say, I like to drink milk with meals and every time I do so, someone - friend, spouse, other - comments that it is strange. What's so strange about a glass of milk???
post #32 of 25454
Nothing strange about drinking milk to me - my wife and I drink about 2 gallons a week. I actually meant my food seems kind of boring in comparison to some of the other "fancy" meals that everyone is mentioning. Bradford
post #33 of 25454
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Nothing strange about drinking milk to me - my wife and I drink about 2 gallons a week. I actually meant my food seems kind of boring in comparison to some of the other "fancy" meals that everyone is mentioning. Bradford
I find that the simplest dishes are often the best. They haven't made it through several centuries without a reason. Last night was salmon in a lemongrass and lime leaves broth, served with basmati rice. It was not spectacular, but the kitchen smelled wonderful.
post #34 of 25454
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I cooked a Jamacian jerked pork -- a big ole' pork shoulder slathered with homemade jerk sauce.
Care to share your recipe for jerk? I go to a place in Bushwick for jerk chicken, but they won't divulge the recipe...
post #35 of 25454
I had some home made "pot au feu" my wife cooked for me. Washed it down with some nice but unexpensive Portuguese red wine. (Pot-au-Feu, a French boiled dinner, has been called the "foundation glory of French Cuisine" as well as France's National Dish. In the cookbook Tante Marie: La bonne et vieille cuisine française this dish forms the basis of many other dishes, from simple bouillion to Beef au Gratin, Hachis Parmentier, Meatballs with sauce and many more. Pronounced: poh tuh fuh sa(n)pl) Is it possible among my generation in the US (I am 30) to find a wife that cooks a nice meal for when you come home from work? American women  always seem so feminist to me.
post #36 of 25454
Thread Starter 
Quote:
And the single law student had... A bagel with cream cheese and coffee.  Later at some pretzels and white wine when I got home before passing out. Pretty pathetic.
We have leftover salmon.
post #37 of 25454
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Is it possible among my generation in the US (I am 30) to find a wife that cooks a nice meal for when you come home from work? American women  always seem so feminist to me.
Your best bet is assuredly to find yourself a foreign wife (I'm going to get killed for that.)
post #38 of 25454
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(Walter @ Feb. 01 2005,11:45) Is it possible among my generation in the US (I am 30) to find a wife that cooks a nice meal for when you come home from work? American women  always seem so feminist to me.
Your best bet is assuredly to find yourself a foreign wife   (I'm going to get killed for that.)
Don't tell your friends you said that. My wife is French but then I don't live in the US. I was just curious. Btw if you like Belgian chocolate have a box of Marcolini when you come to Brussels. A bit expensive, but it's worth it.
post #39 of 25454
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter,Feb. 01 2005,11:45
Is it possible among my generation in the US (I am 30) to find a wife that cooks a nice meal for when you come home from work? American women  always seem so feminist to me.
Your best bet is assuredly to find yourself a foreign wife   (I'm going to get killed for that.)
I don't think you need to find a foreign wife.  If my wife didn't have to work she would definitely cook more.  As it is she cooks often and she works almost as much as me. I think it really comes down to finding a woman who values that.  My wife was raised by a stay at home mom who cooked dinner 360 nights a year (she was FOB from Italy though so maybe the foreign thing does mean something).  Anyway my wife grew up seeing that and wishes she had more time to do the same.  Unfortunately, our life right now is too busy to expect a home cooked meal every night.
post #40 of 25454
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Originally Posted by Stu,Jan. 31 2005,16:33
I cooked a Jamacian jerked pork -- a big ole' pork shoulder slathered with homemade jerk sauce.
Care to share your recipe for jerk?  I go to a place in Bushwick for jerk chicken, but they won't divulge the recipe...
Ask and ye shall receive. Jerked Pork 4-5 pound leg or shoulder of pork (pernil) ¼ C lime juice 1 t garlic powder 1 t fresh thyme leaves 1 t coarsely ground allspice ¼ C jerk rub (recipe below) ¼ C soy sauce 1 scotch bonnet pepper, chopped Wash the pork in cold water, rubbing it thoroughly with lime juice. Rinse and pat dry.  Make crisscross incision on each side of the cut of pork, wide and deep enough to accommodate the tip of a forefinger. In a small bowl, combine the garlic powder, thyme, allspice and half of the jerk rub. Mix well, then stuff the incisions with the mixture. Whatever is left over, combine with the remainder of the jerk rub and rub over the entire pork. Place the pork in a deep dish and pour the soy sauce over it. Cover and refrigerate  overnight, or for at least 3 hours.  Leave uncovered at room temp for an hour before cooking.  When ready to cook, preheat oven to 350 degrees, then transfer the pork to aluminum foil and stuff the incision with the chopped Scotch Bonnet pepper. Pour any remaining jerk rub or pepper over the pork and wrap aluminum foil around it tightly. Place in a baking pan and bake for 4 hours. Remove the foil and bake uncovered for another ½ hour, basting with the pan juices. Remove the pork from the pan and place on a cutting board. Set aside the pan juices. Hack the pork with a sharp cleaver, as is the fashion for true jerk, and transfer the pieces to a serving platter. Pour the pan juices over the meat and serve. Jerk Rub ¾  C finely chopped scallions (white and green parts) 1 T salt 1 t ground allspice ½ t ground nutmeg ¼ t ground cinnamon 4 Scotch Bonnet or Habaneros, or 6 jalapenos. Cut in half, seeds retained 1 t freshly ground black pepper mix all ingredients and mash into a paste in a mortar. Then scrape into a blender or food processor and blend for 1 minute. If you need to, you can add a tablespoon of distilled white vinegar to aid in blending. Store in a covered jar in the fridge. The rub will last for several months.
post #41 of 25454
Hmm, if you try to bring food into California or Hawaii you will likely get it confisiciated and a stern lecture, esp Hawaii... I had some nice Bresse chickens last time I was in the south of France, are they considered free-range chickens?
post #42 of 25454
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I had some nice Bresse chickens last time I was in the south of France, are they considered free-range chickens?
Yes.  They roam around in the Bresse terroir, and are also fed wheat and corn flour, and drink cow's milk.  The Poulet de Bresse is the only chicken to have an AOC (Appellation d'Origine Controlee, like some wines do), which means it has to come from one of three French departements, l'ain, la Saone et Loire or part of le Jura, on the east side of France, and the breed is controlled as well (feathers, for example, are white, the feet have a tinge of blue, etc.).  An authentic poulet de bresse always wears a silver ring that says: "Bresse", and there's a tricolor tag at the base of the neck with the name of the company that prepared the poulet.  There are other compulsory tags, but I can't remember them.
post #43 of 25454
Quote:
Is it possible among my generation in the US (I am 30) to find a wife that cooks a nice meal for when you come home from work? American women  always seem so feminist to me.
no
post #44 of 25454
It depends, many Asian girls will do so Also, you may find some nice midwestern girls that may cook you dinner every night as well On either coast? Probably not.
post #45 of 25454
Quote:
Hmm, if you try to bring food into California or Hawaii you will likely get it confisiciated and a stern lecture, esp Hawaii...  
Bringing any meat products into the U.S. is a very big deal, as there are several types of meat and several countries of origin that are strictly forbidden from importation. U.S. Customs will at best give you a very stern lecture for bringing undeclared meat products into the country, and can fine you and/or enter your name into their computer system for "special attention" on future encounters. On US domestic travel, the Hawaii and CA state agriculture inspectors can get nasty, but they don't (at least I don't think they do) flag you in the TECS system. They don't have those meat-sniffing dogs like US Customs either (no, I'm not kidding).
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