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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 1858

post #27856 of 27937
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

Some nice white figs picked up alongside the motorway. Driving on the left side of the road is quite a time!

Where are you?

I haven't seen so many figs where we are for many years. One friend took 15 kilos off his tree the other weekend.
post #27857 of 27937
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

Where are you?

I haven't seen so many figs where we are for many years. One friend took 15 kilos off his tree the other weekend.

New Zealand, mate.
post #27858 of 27937
Gomer and I are debating steak. What is your preferred cooking method?

For highly marbled cuts over two inches in thickness, I like to sous vide--including a pre and post-sear. Reasoning is that traditional methods tend to leave the center too rare and the outside too well-done. To get the center correct, you risk drying-out the rest of the steak. In contrast, going the sous vide route, I can get the entirety of the steak to the slightly medium side of medium-rare, which to me is ideal when there is a lot of marbling. Searing before and after takes care of the browning/caramelizing while minimizing risk of further cooking the meat.
post #27859 of 27937
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Gomer and I are debating steak. What is your preferred cooking method?

For highly marbled cuts over two inches in thickness, I like to sous vide--including a pre and post-sear. Reasoning is that traditional methods tend to leave the center too rare and the outside too well-done. To get the center correct, you risk drying-out the rest of the steak. In contrast, going the sous vide route, I can get the entirety of the steak to the slightly medium side of medium-rare, which to me is ideal when there is a lot of marbling. Searing before and after takes care of the browning/caramelizing while minimizing risk of further cooking the meat.

 

I use Kenji's reverse sear method.

post #27860 of 27937
I rarely go in the 2"+ category, but I'm a sous-vide convert for steak, replacing the screaming hot cast iron skillet into a 500 degree oven, similar to this method. The old method worked well, but it would be a stretch for thick steaks. Would salt and warm up at room temp for an hour with the old method (although I have seen claims that this doesn't warm it up enough to matter...).

Haven't tried the pre-sear sous vide method, and have not experimented with different salt times. Warming it up in advance obviously doesn't matter with a target-temp sous vide bath. Bring it to temp (or slightly below temp for a thinner steak) and then sear. Have considered pulling out the torch and using it on the top between flips since my electric stove struggles to get the pan screaming hot.
post #27861 of 27937
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I use Kenji's reverse sear method.

Hmm. From my understanding, the only benefit of reverse searing versus sous vide is a supposedly better sear. But I've been able to get a pretty good sear on my sous vide steaks, and the other advantages are too great.
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I rarely go in the 2"+ category, but I'm a sous-vide convert for steak, replacing the screaming hot cast iron skillet into a 500 degree oven, similar to this method. The old method worked well, but it would be a stretch for thick steaks. Would salt and warm up at room temp for an hour with the old method (although I have seen claims that this doesn't warm it up enough to matter...).

Haven't tried the pre-sear sous vide method, and have not experimented with different salt times. Warming it up in advance obviously doesn't matter with a target-temp sous vide bath. Bring it to temp (or slightly below temp for a thinner steak) and then sear. Have considered pulling out the torch and using it on the top between flips since my electric stove struggles to get the pan screaming hot.

I freeze for 20-30 minutes first, then pre-sear. This reduces the chance of cooking into the meat. After the water bath, you only need 30-45 seconds per side to re-crisp.

I figure the pre-sear cannot hurt and only has potential benefits, but would be happy to be corrected and lose the extra step.
post #27862 of 27937
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


Hmm. From my understanding, the only benefit of reverse searing versus sous vide is a supposedly better sear. But I've been able to get a pretty good sear on my sous vide steaks, and the other advantages are too great.

 

The con is you have to have a sous vide machine (which I don't).  I have had absolutely zero problem getting medium rare throughout with a nice crust though.  I typically am making a tenderloin or rib roast rather than individual steaks though.

 

Kenji also just posted an article about the fat flash:
 

Quote:
 If I'm grilling steaks or chops outdoors at home, I use a very similar approach: I cook the meat, then let it rest. Just before serving, I flash it on the hottest fire I can muster for about 15 seconds per side. If I'm cooking indoors, I sear the steak in hot fat, then let the meat rest on a wire rack set in a rimmed baking sheet. Then, just before serving, I reheat the fat and juices left over in the skillet until they're smoking-hot and pour them right over the steaks—you'll see them sizzle and sputter as they crisp up. This is similar to the restaurant hot-oven flash, but it works even better: Hot fat is a more efficient means of heat transfer than hot air, which means faster crisping with less chance of overcooking. It also adds a final shot of flavor to the surface of the steak.
post #27863 of 27937
I now get my steaks at CostCo, well marbled Prime, 2" thick ribeyes. Being CostCo, they come in packs of five-six. I buy enough packs so I get an even number. S&P aggressively on both sides. One side of the bag gets thinly sliced onion and garlic, other side gets thyme, sage, and rosemary. Whatever is not getting cooked that night gets frozen in pairs. No butter or other lipid added to bag. If fresh three hours at 130 degrees, if frozen add an hour (being able to pull something out of the freezer that ends up this good is like mana from heaven.) Remove from bag, remove all cooking herbs, pat dry. Have black iron pan screaming hot with just a little grape seed oil wiped on with a paper towel. Meat gets a blend dusted on it (my blend, S&P, smoked paprika, a couple other things.) Twenty seconds or so in smoking hot pan, drop a couple of knobs of butter, sliced garlic and a rosemary twig into pan, move steaks through the butter mix, flip. Twenty seconds or so, use tongs to get the ends browned too. Whole pan process 90 seconds or less.

post #27864 of 27937
Now you're going to have to try pre-searing them all before freezing the extras nest.gif

3 hours seems pretty long no? Are you still using the Sous Vide Supreme that doesn't circulate the water?


Those times are for 1.5-2" steaks.

I don't think I would even go 3 hours from frozen (and they note that under 130, there are food safety concerns going over 2.5 hours). I'd be extra concerned given the costco steaks are almost always mechanically tenderized which could introduce contaminants deep into the meat.
post #27865 of 27937
Lately, the only steak I have been buying are the prime ribeye caps from costco and uncoiling them...so cooking times are pretty short on account of being <1"

Haven't tried throwing them in the bath coiled up. It might work, but I'm slightly more concerned about contaminants and would want to take the temp a bit higher.

Wish they would sell them unsliced...but the pieces they coil up are big enough for my tastes.
post #27866 of 27937
Pio, you need to add more herbs and seasonings . . .

I over three hours is okay if your temp exceeds 130 degrees. 129 is the cut-off, I think.
post #27867 of 27937
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Pio, you need to add more herbs and seasonings . . .

Mock away but we had people over last weekend, and I only used CostCo choice, and they said it was the best steak they've ever had. The meat shines right through as sous vide with all the herbs is pretty subtle, my blend is a very light dusting, and just helps get the crust.

Otc, did not realize CostCo was mechanically softening. Your table there says 1-4 (not frozen) at 130 so three hours not frozen isn't outlandish. The mechanical softening has me a little concerned though as I always figured if there any bugs growing on the surface my sear would kill them. Yeah, it won't get a deeply injected bug.
post #27868 of 27937
I've mostly moved to Tri Tip steaks which I quick sear in a cast iron pan, then roast in oven for a bit, then finish off in pan with lots of butter and garlic. I then just slice it thin across the grain, perfect doneness for me every time without being super specific in terms of time and temp. Terrific taste and mouthfeel. I have had one sous vide steak in my life and did not like the consistency. I am a believer that "basic" foods are best made as basically as possible. I saw someone sous viding a "luxe" hamburger and I wanted to kick them in the teeth.
post #27869 of 27937
Oh, otc, moved to the ANova more than a year ago.
post #27870 of 27937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


Otc, did not realize CostCo was mechanically softening. Your table there says 1-4 (not frozen) at 130 so three hours not frozen isn't outlandish. The mechanical softening has me a little concerned though as I always figured if there any bugs growing on the surface my sear would kill them. Yeah, it won't get a deeply injected bug.


I manually soften my meat to avoid any contaminants.
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