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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 1615

post #24211 of 25282
Oh, also had Hazan's tomato sauce yesterday. Made it with San Marzano tomatoes (the real deal). Wasn't too fond of it, I remembered them being better. Too sour. The sauce made with regular De Cecco plum tomatoes was much better!
post #24212 of 25282
I also made the sauce with San Marzano tomatoes last night. Mine wasn't too sour, but I did prefer the first version I made with Muir Glen tomatoes. Still tasty, though.
post #24213 of 25282
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Drew, or someone more experienced with Japanese table manners, is it acceptable to hold the bowl of, say, Gyudon in your hand and hold it closer to your mouth (I find it easier to eat rice that way without slouching over the bowl)?

Likewise, when eating ramen (or similar), is it okay to hold the bowl in your hand and drink from it, or do you use the spoon if one is provided; do you slurp the noodles with the bowl on the table (and likely in a slouched position) or is holding the bowl in your hand acceptable too (or even better?)?

Same for miso soup. Spoon or drink from bowl?

When served Gyudon with miso soup and the "pickled" ginger, do you eat the Gyudon first (while having a bit of ginger now and then) and finish with the miso soup or vice versa? Or "mix" however you please?

For picking up a bowl of rice, or any bowl of something I hold in my hand while eating and need chopsticks for, I place the chopsticks on the rest on the table, pick up the bowl with two hands, then hold it with the left hand, pick up the chopsticks with the right hand, draw out the ring finger of my left hand, rest the chopsticks there to adjust the grip, pick them up again with my right hand and start eating. For putting the bowl down, I do the same steps in reverse order.

When having finished a meal, do you leave the chopsticks flat on top of a bowl? Or do you leave it on the rest (or the improvised rest)?

Japanese people lift the bowl to their mouth and shovel it in with their chopsticks although with things like ramen most people just leave it on the table. Japanese people also don't really use spoons. Most people just sip directly from the bowl. Koreans are opposite. You never lift the bowl to your mouth, never slurp, and always use spoons

The other thing is Japanese and Koreans (and Laotians) use short grain or sticky rice which makes it easier to eat using chopsticks. So you might potentially be using longer grain rice that's harder to eat with just chopsticks from bowl on table to mouth

Usually in kaiseki ryori and sushi omakases (ie more formal dining) the miso comes at the very end although it can appear in any place. In informal dining there really aren't any rules. Asian people don't really do appetizers or set courses at least in informal dining. You just get a farmers table full of things and have at it. This is probably why when you go to an Asian restaurant they will screw up the timing of the soup or appetizer thing on occasion.

Also japanese people don't mix the white rice with anything (although you can put things on top like in gyudon or chirashi sushi). You don't add soy sauce to the rice and you don't add rice to the soup. Koreans tend to add rice to their soup and eat it that way. They also only drink water at the end of the meal which they do by adding the water to their now empty rice bowl

You should be able to pick up the bowl in one hand and the chopsticks gripped in the other. Not sure why you need adjusting. You can leave chopsticks on top of the bowl or on a chopstick rest but definitely don't stick it in the rice at least in front of older Japanese, Chinese, and korean people.
Edited by indesertum - 12/10/13 at 6:04pm
post #24214 of 25282
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

Japanese people lift the bowl to their mouth and shovel it in with their chopsticks although with things like ramen most people just leave it on the table. Japanese people also don't really use spoons. Most people just sip directly from the bowl. Koreans are opposite. You never lift the bowl to your mouth, never slurp, and always use spoons

The other thing is Japanese and Koreans (and Laotians) use short grain or sticky rice which makes it easier to eat using chopsticks. So you might potentially be using longer grain rice that's harder to eat with just chopsticks from bowl on table to mouth

Usually in kaiseki ryori and sushi omakases (ie more formal dining) the miso comes at the very end although it can appear in any place. In informal dining there really aren't any rules. Asian people don't really do appetizers or set courses at least in informal dining. You just get a farmers table full of things and have at it. This is probably why when you go to an Asian restaurant they will screw up the timing of the soup or appetizer thing on occasion.

Also japanese people don't mix the rice with anything (although you can put things on top like in gyudon or chirashi sushi). You don't add soy sauce to the rice and you don't add rice to the soup. Koreans tend to add rice to their soup and eat it that way. They also only drink water at the end of the meal which they do by adding the water to their now empty rice bowl

You should be able to pick up the bowl in one hand and the chopsticks gripped in the other. Not sure why you need adjusting. You can leave chopsticks on top of the bowl or on a chopstick rest but definitely don't stick it in the rice at least in front of older Japanese, Chinese, and korean people.
Thanks.

I remember reading in Tsuji's book that miso soup comes last. I guess it's unfortunate to serve miso soup and (for example) Gyudon at the same time, but given the circumstance, it's probably best to eat the miso soup first flavour-wise.

Regarding the bowl/chopsticks/adjusting phase, I picked that up from some video posted by the Japan Times. It makes sense, I guess.
post #24215 of 25282
Have had Gyudon at Heno Heno twice now. Better than at Cocolo. Really good, actually. And relatively cheap (4.90 € for a huge bowl --4.50 or 4.10 € for medium or small bowl) + 0.70 € for onsen tamago + 0.30 € for the ginger). Their edamame (1.20 €) and nukazuke (1.40 €) are good too. And their ginger lemonade (green tea-based, I think) for 2.20 € is outstainding. Miso soup (1.20 €) is very good too. So yeah, had edamame for the first time today. Wasn't exactly sure how to eat it. I assume you just eat the beans, right? Then again, I thought it wasn't very Japanese to just eat the beans and discard semi-chewed pods. So I've eaten the whole thing. shog[1].gif A bit (or rather, very) chewy and lots of fibres, but tasty. For the record though, you just eat the beans, right? The beans were very good, the pod not that good. happy.gif Chopsticks or hand?

Will try their Japanese curry tomorrow.

Either way, gotta try to cook some gyudon soon. Can't be that difficult.
post #24216 of 25282
Going to x post this as I had it as part of dinner. Duck breast prosciutto. Been aging for three weeks now. I'm going to let the other breast age longer for comparison. Very rich, nicely spiced, tender. I'm happy for my first try. My only dissatisfier is it did not behave on the slicer as I might have wished. Should have semi-frozen it I guess.

post #24217 of 25282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Going to x post this as I had it as part of dinner. Duck breast prosciutto. Been aging for three weeks now. I'm going to let the other breast age longer for comparison. Very rich, nicely spiced, tender. I'm happy for my first try. My only dissatisfier is it did not behave on the slicer as I might have wished. Should have semi-frozen it I guess. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Interesting. Have you tried smoking duck breasts? Magret de Canard fumé, for example by Edouard Artzner, is so fucking delicious.
post #24218 of 25282
I've not tried that. As I have eight really nice breasts in the freezer I should try it.
post #24219 of 25282
Do it! And if you don't, at least buy some smoked duck breasts (I think Edouard Artzner should be available in the US too). It's really very good, though one batch was a bit salty compared to the other few batches I've had. I've bought a few packages and ate *lots* of it a year or so ago when a local store had a clearance and sold them for like 3-5 € per package (they're 10-12 € else).
post #24220 of 25282
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Have had Gyudon at Heno Heno twice now. Better than at Cocolo. Really good, actually. And relatively cheap (4.90 € for a huge bowl --4.50 or 4.10 € for medium or small bowl) + 0.70 € for onsen tamago + 0.30 € for the ginger). Their edamame (1.20 €) and nukazuke (1.40 €) are good too. And their ginger lemonade (green tea-based, I think) for 2.20 € is outstainding. Miso soup (1.20 €) is very good too. So yeah, had edamame for the first time today. Wasn't exactly sure how to eat it. I assume you just eat the beans, right? Then again, I thought it wasn't very Japanese to just eat the beans and discard semi-chewed pods. So I've eaten the whole thing. shog[1].gif A bit (or rather, very) chewy and lots of fibres, but tasty. For the record though, you just eat the beans, right? The beans were very good, the pod not that good. happy.gif Chopsticks or hand?

Will try their Japanese curry tomorrow.

Either way, gotta try to cook some gyudon soon. Can't be that difficult.

Lol you just eat the beans with your hands

Also that video you posted is only for super formal chaji. Even at a kaiseki meal you don't eat that way unless maybe you're eating with a head monk or tea master. Hence why even the japanese gentlemen need to be trained

It's not that difficult to make. My favorite donburi is probably oyakodon but you need a really good dashi for that which are generally a pain to make

Usually the miso is complimentary at most gyudon places but it's generally shitty miso made with powder
post #24221 of 25282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aesthetical View Post

Ate at a buffet.
Great news.

Had edamame today. Just the beans. So much better. laugh.gif (actually, I love the taste). Popped out all the beans, then ate them with chopsticks.
Edited by b1os - 12/13/13 at 11:48am
post #24222 of 25282

primo-Strozzapreti con speck and porcini

secondo- costolette di maile with roast potatoes

dolce- zuppe inglese

post #24223 of 25282
wOriWS

was practicing fluting mushrooms, so, naturally, I had a bunch of disfigured mushrooms that needed to be eaten.

I got pretty close to a good flute on my very last one.

post #24224 of 25282
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Great news.

Had edamame today. Just the beans. So much better. laugh.gif (actually, I love the taste). Popped out all the beans, then ate them with chopsticks.

Best way to do it is grab one, bite down on the far end, and pull the pod out so the beans stay in your mouth. No chopsticks necessary

Also nice skills. I know Koreans who can't pick up beans with their chopsticks
post #24225 of 25282
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