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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 1579

post #23671 of 25349
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Jean-Georges was fantastic. Exactly what I was looking for and an incredible value. I'd almost be tempted to go back tomorrow.

The charred corn ravioli was great--stood out strongly against the carmelized beef tenderloin (which had a $15 supplement, but the dudes next to me were eating it and it looked great). The beef was good, but the ravioli is my favorite dish I have eaten in a while... There was a bit of a delay in the service on the first dish, but they comped me my digestif and I didn't really have anywhere to be anyways.
Well did they at least have many varieties of aquavit? Most places don't have any, but they used to be able to do whole flights. I might still give it a shot. They got a Michelin star this year, so they can't be all bad and I have a hankering for something like that.

I think they carry 3-4 different labels. The rest are infusions. I wasn't impressed t all with the infusions. Most of them looked like the work of a novice bartender. I didn't try them, tans that for what it's worth.

That said only 4 labels is disappointing. 2 of those labels suck anyways. I'm not an expert on the spirit, but I know more than the average bear. I would assume they would have a much better selection.
post #23672 of 25349
How do you prepare your polenta? In the past I've made a quick version, i.e. dump polenta in not too much water, let cook for a short while, spread 1" thick and then cut rounds out of it to heat them up in some butter. I also added quite a bit of butter and Parmigiano to the polenta, which adds a good amount of flavor.

A few days ago, I've tried the "classic" preperation from Hazan's book. 1.75 liters of water, 250g polenta and cook for about 30-45 minutes while stirring every now and then until it's a uniform texture. Dump in a bowl, let sit for 10 minutes, turn upside down and serve or let cool down to heat up later on. I served it immeadiately, maybe didn't wait long enough to let it "harden up" a bit. The texture was very odd--very slimey--and the taste was a bit of an odd pairing with a savoury meal. Guess I'll have to try it again, but I wasn't a fan. What about you?
post #23673 of 25349
Going to JG for lunch tomorrow, actually...
post #23674 of 25349
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

Tempura Kondo: 2 star tempura, cheaper end of the spectrum at 8400 yen/head lunch. On the high end of the tempura game, 7Chome Kyoboshi at 3 stars is something like 45,000 yen per head at lunch or dinner, which makes it one of the most expensive meals in Tokyo, so Kondo rates as good cost performance. Tempura is very straightforward and simply delivers ingredients cooked to perfection. The asparagus was revelatory. I had the same large asparagus fried in Kadaif at L'Atelier de Joel Robuchon just the day before, and the tempura version was superior. The cross section that some of these ingredients gain after frying is beautiful. Notably, the pans in which the Japanese use for deep (really, it's shallow) frying things like tempura and tonkatsu cost in the neighborhood of $10,000 each, and a restaurant will have several.

I went to Mikawa Zezankyo last week. Your discussion hits it, except that I'm not sure that anything was revelatory (though I also had very good asparagus). But I don't know that Im in a rush to return to a specialist tempura restaurant that soon because the tempura frying at Kadowaki, Matsukawa, Ishikawa etc. is just as good, with equally good ingredients (if not better).

But maybe it's just that I kind of didn't really want more fried things (no matter how well done) after them5 or 6th piece. Plus things like kisu and nasu become kind of painful to eat.

Still glad I went though.
post #23675 of 25349
For polenta, I use chicken stock, not water, and heat it by itself. Then I pour in the grain gradually a little at a time and keep cooking/stirring until it has soaked up all the liquid. Then it gets a goodly amount of cream and butter.

You can serve it like that, it will be quite loose but not "slimey" or you spread it on a sheet, let it harden in the fridge, cut it into squares and quickly pan fry it.
post #23676 of 25349
Quote:

Crispy sous vide pork belly with honey mesquite glaze

Sous vide white asparagus with shaved prosciutto (reminded me of a dish we had at some random French guy's restaurant)

Nice night and hoping these things make it onto the fall menu.


Two questions:

Glaze, or bark?

Are there actually any French guys that have restaurants? I've certainly not heard of any.
post #23677 of 25349
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

In other news, Corton is finished. Apparently Drew Nieporont couldn't be happier to get rid of Liebrandt. Ehkay and I must have eaten at one of their last dinner service.

If only it closed a day earlier...
post #23678 of 25349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

there is a red rooster offshoot at JFK and I had a very, very good burger there a few weeks ago. Only good thing I can say about JFK at this stage.

Get global entry/PreScreen and JFK is like, totes amaze.
post #23679 of 25349
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehkay View Post

Get global entry/PreScreen and JFK is like, totes amaze.

Global entry is pretty nice - well worth the slight hassle of getting it. Customs/immigration at LAX is usually not terrible, in my experience. But at the end of a trip, after 15 hours on a plane when you're tired and this close to being home, it's pretty sweet to get out that last door in 2 minutes rather than 20 or 40.
post #23680 of 25349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

For polenta, I use chicken stock, not water, and heat it by itself. Then I pour in the grain gradually a little at a time and keep cooking/stirring until it has soaked up all the liquid. Then it gets a goodly amount of cream and butter.

You can serve it like that, it will be quite loose but not "slimey" or you spread it on a sheet, let it harden in the fridge, cut it into squares and quickly pan fry it.

I've had decent results like this but am uncertain to how much cream to add- just to thin it/loosen it a little or?
post #23681 of 25349
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehkay View Post

I went to Mikawa Zezankyo last week. Your discussion hits it, except that I'm not sure that anything was revelatory (though I also had very good asparagus). But I don't know that Im in a rush to return to a specialist tempura restaurant that soon because the tempura frying at Kadowaki, Matsukawa, Ishikawa etc. is just as good, with equally good ingredients (if not better).

But maybe it's just that I kind of didn't really want more fried things (no matter how well done) after them5 or 6th piece. Plus things like kisu and nasu become kind of painful to eat.

Still glad I went though.

Kondo was my first serious tempura experience as well, had been putting tempura like that off since I figured what to expect and that I also knew I'd get about halfway through the meal and wish for something not fried. It wasn't bad in that regard in the end, but the other specialty restaurants do so much more, I agree. I don't know if I'll ever make it to 7chome Kyoboshi now, given all the other places to eat at, and especially since they are half or less. I'm already ready to go back to Sushi Yoshitake the minute the weather changes again. I will try Saito soon but I think I will still prefer the composed flow of Yoshitake.
post #23682 of 25349
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

How do you prepare your polenta? In the past I've made a quick version, i.e. dump polenta in not too much water, let cook for a short while, spread 1" thick and then cut rounds out of it to heat them up in some butter. I also added quite a bit of butter and Parmigiano to the polenta, which adds a good amount of flavor.

A few days ago, I've tried the "classic" preperation from Hazan's book. 1.75 liters of water, 250g polenta and cook for about 30-45 minutes while stirring every now and then until it's a uniform texture. Dump in a bowl, let sit for 10 minutes, turn upside down and serve or let cool down to heat up later on. I served it immeadiately, maybe didn't wait long enough to let it "harden up" a bit. The texture was very odd--very slimey--and the taste was a bit of an odd pairing with a savoury meal. Guess I'll have to try it again, but I wasn't a fan. What about you?

INCOMING EDINA
if you're just going to fry it, instant polenta is fine. by the time you're done with the second cooking, the nuance of the traditional preparation is lost. that said, once it gets cooler outside, there's nothing like a nice dish of soft polenta topped with a little ragu and some parm.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

For polenta, I use chicken stock, not water, and heat it by itself. Then I pour in the grain gradually a little at a time and keep cooking/stirring until it has soaked up all the liquid. Then it gets a goodly amount of cream and butter.
frenchy.
post #23683 of 25349
2:2:1 milk, stock, polenta. Bring liquid to simmer, slowly stir in polenta, simmer and stir til done. Add butter and cheese.

That's the only way I've ever done it. Seems to work just fine.
post #23684 of 25349
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

For polenta, I use chicken stock, not water, and heat it by itself. Then I pour in the grain gradually a little at a time and keep cooking/stirring until it has soaked up all the liquid. Then it gets a goodly amount of cream and butter.

You can serve it like that, it will be quite loose but not "slimey" or you spread it on a sheet, let it harden in the fridge, cut it into squares and quickly pan fry it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

INCOMING EDINA
if you're just going to fry it, instant polenta is fine. by the time you're done with the second cooking, the nuance of the traditional preparation is lost. that said, once it gets cooler outside, there's nothing like a nice dish of soft polenta topped with a little ragu and some parm.
frenchy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

2:2:1 milk, stock, polenta. Bring liquid to simmer, slowly stir in polenta, simmer and stir til done. Add butter and cheese.

That's the only way I've ever done it. Seems to work just fine.

Thanks guys. I guess the plain water/no butter/no cheese route is what didn't appeal to me.

fg, actually, I didn't even use instant polenta when I used to fry it. I followed some recipe from the Cordon Bleu cookbook and the polenta absorbed the whole water in literally a minute. Didn't taste "uncooked".

Manton, Kyle, this is what I did too. Bring water to a boil, then add the polenta little by little while whisking. Then continue stirring it with a "spoon". That's the way Hazan describes.
post #23685 of 25349
Quote:
Originally Posted by binge View Post

Thanks for the advice mgm9128, much better this time around.


Looks better. I would only suggest you try chopping the walnuts a bit finer.
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