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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 1577

post #23641 of 25866
Jean-Georges was fantastic. Exactly what I was looking for and an incredible value. I'd almost be tempted to go back tomorrow.

The charred corn ravioli was great--stood out strongly against the carmelized beef tenderloin (which had a $15 supplement, but the dudes next to me were eating it and it looked great). The beef was good, but the ravioli is my favorite dish I have eaten in a while... There was a bit of a delay in the service on the first dish, but they comped me my digestif and I didn't really have anywhere to be anyways.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bhowie View Post

I thought it was nice. Their bar is lacking.

Well did they at least have many varieties of aquavit? Most places don't have any, but they used to be able to do whole flights. I might still give it a shot. They got a Michelin star this year, so they can't be all bad and I have a hankering for something like that.
post #23642 of 25866
glad to hear that J-G is still awesome.
post #23643 of 25866
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

I know the chef. He used to be the sous at EMP. Nice guy. Haven't been yet.

Let us know if/when you try it out.
post #23644 of 25866
Will do.
Roast poularde
AppleMark
post #23645 of 25866
Azabu Yukimura (3* Japanese home style food, counter dining, plus pike eel specialty) - was less enthused with this meal. It was a little expensive for the materials used, and nothing was particularly superlative. I had this meal the day before Sushi Yoshitake. Yukimura does a subtle amount more entertaining/hosting than is usual for Japanese chefs at this level, but the experience is standard fare. Pike eel preparation requires a license in Japan, like fugu, presumably because of all of the tiny pin bones. Part of the experience is in watching Yukimura's knife skills, and the nearly two foot long knife itself (which is his own model, made by Aritsugu)

Many of the flavors would be pleasant to westerners, however as with many Japanese foods, and especially during the summer - there are snottier textures which westerners would find unpleasant. Mountain yam and junsai among them.

Lobster/crab jelly over uni, with rather large/crunchy flying fish roe, was served in a hollowed out sea urchin



very average soba was covered in a generous amount of grated karasumi



grilled ayu, which are in season


roasted corn kakiage tempura was served with a number of dressed vegetable sides, alongside the grilled ayu. Vinegared cucumber with bits of grilled unagi and jellyfish, plus some vegetables in tofu and sesame based dressings. The corn tempura is popular everywhere throughout August (I ate something like 5 versions last weekend) but this was the only one that involved caramelization before frying. Quite good.




Suimono clear soup with the first of the pike eel preparations. The pike eel was prepared a la minut and the soup finished counter-side. Strong of ginger, but not much else. I normally love suimono soups but this one was not an amazing one.


thick slabs of abalone were served in a vinegared sea vegatable and junsai bed, the texture of the sea vegetables slimy. The abalone with a raw crunch to it. This was unremarkable except for the size of the abalone itself, which was slightly large.


white squid strips were served on a bed of grated mountain yam. The rubbery snap of squid with the slightly grainy aftertaste and mouthfeel along with the mucus-like texture of mountain yam would not make this much of a favorite for foreign diners.


Grilled pike eel was served with Sansho leaves (sichuan pepper) and the leaves themselves give off the same flavor as the peppercorn. The attraction to pike eel is the texture (which includes the bones, though they are prepared in such a way that each bone is cut so that they can be chewed and swallowed.) The fish itself is slightly dry and the appeal of this dish would be lost on westerners. From September, Yukimura says the pike eel will be rolled around Maitake mushrooms and grilled roulade style, as his protege Okamoto also does at his own restaurant now.


Ayu was served a second time, this time fried on a bed of thickened sweet and sour sauce, with grilled long green peppers that are much like the Spanish ones. I thought this was also an unremarkable dish.


Excellent quality wagyu beef was made sukiyaki-style at the counter, scorched in the sauce. Served over cold marinated eggplant, with a garnish of lilybud. Good flavors, although the meat seemed to be deliberately overcooked and was mostly crust.
post #23646 of 25866
m, I do share you enthusiasm for consuming all of God's winged creatures as often as possible.
post #23647 of 25866
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehkay View Post

Probably a result of doing it in a mold and pressing down on it excessively. Our boy would compress that shit in the vacuum sealer and a ton of salt though /ideainfood.

I am not sure if they prepared the tomato mille feuille to order, or if it was done ahead of time; in any case, mgm's version looks more carefully prepared and better looking than what was served to me at Robuchon, by Joel Robuchon himself - we had a bit of an imperfection with the virgin mary coulis as you can see, and the mille feuille a bit too pressed down;

post #23648 of 25866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

m, I do share you enthusiasm for consuming all of God's winged creatures as often as possible.

I could eat these birds every night. I think I've cooked 5 or 6 in the past 2 weeks.
post #23649 of 25866
This, I think, is a photo of the way it should look when compressed properly, and prepared by Joel Robuchon, himself.
post #23650 of 25866
i hate the dots. i just imagine some sweaty french culinary school intern breathing all over the plate as he manages to get the dots done.
post #23651 of 25866
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

i hate the dots. i just imagine some sweaty french culinary school intern breathing all over the plate as he manages to get the dots done.
unless his sweat gets on the plate, that is not a reason to hate the dots
post #23652 of 25866
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

it's the same one. part of samuelsson's weird story -- kenyan scandinavian chef with restaurants in minneapolis and manhattan. there was a nasty business dispute and i belive the minneapolis store closed some time ago.
It did. Too bad, too... But truth be told, some notoriously bad moments of customer service.
post #23653 of 25866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

unless his sweat gets on the plate, that is not a reason to hate the dots

still hate the dots based on huffing over the plate alone. can't help it.
post #23654 of 25866
I though samuelson was Ethiopian.
post #23655 of 25866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I though samuelson was Ethiopian.

i just remember that when he was on top chef masters, every single fucking time he was interviewed he brought up his "Ethiopian (or whatever)" background, and it was really annoying.
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