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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 1573

post #23581 of 25454
yes thanks. Do you do anything with the tomato "meat"?
post #23582 of 25454
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I think you are supposed to go the other way. It makes for a cleaner tomato piece.

Nice of you to show up!
post #23583 of 25454
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

yes thanks. Do you do anything with the tomato "meat"?

It's used in the sauce.
post #23584 of 25454
smile.gif
post #23585 of 25454
Coda (oxtail) alla vaccinara (recipe from M. Hazan). Shredded. Served with baguette, burro. Great meat. Quite fatty, but very delicious. Skimmed off about 150 ml of fat (probably more) from 1.2 kg of oxtail and 5 tbsp of olive oil. Braised for ~2-3 hours.
post #23586 of 25454
Grouse
post #23587 of 25454
I've tried doing those tomato strips and can't get it without breaking the flesh too much. I had that dish at Robuchon recently and the tomato 'meat' was in quite thick strips too. I was mostly surprised at how densely packed the whole mille feuille was. I have the recipe in a generic french cookbook in Japanese and they specify for the tomato meat to be flattened under saran wrap, and for the whole thing to be built in a diamond shaped form.
post #23588 of 25454
Here is my meal at Sushi Yoshitake (3* sushi) - this was probably the best meal I've ever had in my life. The whole meal was almost musical; a two-part suite with an adagio movement of sashimi dishes that was casual in pace, a one-plate intermezzo of palate cleanser, and then a quicker allegro movement when he began the edomae nigiri portion of the meal, whereby you eat the nigiri much faster so that the rice doesn't cool too much. There is no dessert; instead, some of the nigiri phase serves as the sweet ending. I think every piece of food presented to me was flirting with perfection in taste and presentation, and the meal served with smiles.
70% or so of his fish is sourced directly from fishers around Japan, and is of the best quality, bypassing Tsukiji wholesale market. In addition to beer and sake, there is a very short edited wine list, and wine is served by a sommelier, in Lobmeyr crystal. There are seven seats in total and the room is tiny, in a nondescript building of Ginza that is mostly populated by hostess clubs. Finding this place is pretty much impossible unless you can read Hiragana, but Yoshitake seemed totally at ease with me being non-Japanese, unlike Jiro. The price for the omakase is pretty fair for top-drawer Ginza sushi and $500 for two people would suffice if not deliberately drinking too much wine; given the nature of the meal i think it was quite decently priced. The wine list contains many half bottles, which is an intelligent choice, given the pace and variety at which sushi is served. One could easily drink champagne in lieu of sake or beer throughout the meal, or even move to another wine around the point when the red meats of the nigiri portion come into play.


uni pudding to open. I thought it was corn tofu with a dashi gelee layer on top but i was told otherwise. Still, that was what I tasted. the uni was very large and creamy.

red snapper. Wonderful texture. The following sashimi were served with a mound of wasabi, and a ball of pickled cucumber and myoga (lilybud) ribbons as palate cleansers. The cucumber mix was very pleasant as well. Snapper and the following sashimi were served with their own type of soy sauce for dipping, and we were instructed to add our own amount of wasabi before using the shoyu.

I didn't catch the name of this fish, but it was obviously a very dark red meat cut and quite large. It could have been some sort of tuna. Very mild in flavor, and served tataki style. Two large pieces.

Cooked abalone, with a slightly bitter sauce made from abalone guts. Once the three pieces of abalone are eaten, Yoshitake makes a mound of sushi rice and gives it to you to finish the sauce off. The texture of the abalone was luscious and rich. Smooth, with just a hint of resistance to the bite.


Skipjack tuna sashimi - char-grilled on skewers in the back and brought to the front counter. Served with a small dab of western horseradish mixed with green onions, and on it's own tailored soy sauce.

palate cleanser of a smaller shrimp, okra, edamade, over sudachi gelee. brunoise of cucumber and mountain yam in the gelee, along with a sea green I can't remember the name of. chiffonade of Myoga. the taste was clean and bright.


nigiri is served with two different rices; both are made with red vinegar but they are of separate types, and Yoshitake chooses which rice to use based on individual fish and alternates between the two. The pace is quick, but not unreasonably fast. I think pieces were made about once per 2-3 minutes.

sumi-ika

kuchimi-dai (a type of snapper I think)

kisu (like a small whiting)

Tuna duet is:
akami (lean dry aged maguro)

Toro

Kohada (one of my least favorite sushis; still, this was pleasant enough and milder in flavor than most)

Kobashira (bay scallops) gunkan maki

Saba (mackerel)

Uni (sourced from Karatsu) gunkan maki - stunningly large, sweet, and creamy. Superlative example of uni. That piece on top was easily 2 inches long.

Kuruma-ebi, served without head or tail, unlike other places.

Anago

Tamago - extremely soft and custard like in texture, resembling a Castela cake. I asked and it was made with ground small shrimp, mountain yam, as well as other things - and cooked on stovetop for over one hour on low heat. Sweet in taste, in a natural way. This begins the 'dessert' portion of the meal, while ending the edomae series.

Miso broth is served at the end; based on a fish stock, but made with barley miso, which is sweeter than bean miso.
post #23589 of 25454
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

I've tried doing those tomato strips and can't get it without breaking the flesh too much. I had that dish at Robuchon recently and the tomato 'meat' was in quite thick strips too. I was mostly surprised at how densely packed the whole mille feuille was. I have the recipe in a generic french cookbook in Japanese and they specify for the tomato meat to be flattened under saran wrap, and for the whole thing to be built in a diamond shaped form.

Probably a result of doing it in a mold and pressing down on it excessively. Our boy would compress that shit in the vacuum sealer and a ton of salt though /ideainfood.
post #23590 of 25454
I would try to compress it a bit more the next time I make it. I did let the tomato strips sit for a few hours between two sheet pans, and I did use a piece of matboard to help tamper down each layer as I was building it. There is a video of it being assembled here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIwL3Tl5w3o

To expand on the grouse I ate last night..it was really the best grouse I have ever tasted. Just gamey enough in flavor, but not too mild, either. I suppose a few people who are used to eating their grouse after having been hung for periods of up to 3 weeks were a bit disappointed by this. I thought it was just right, but I am not one for too much rot on my meat, and I think there can be a tipping point. The preparation was executed perfectly. Roasted on the bone with juniper berries, topped with a julienne of Australian truffles, the breasts were as tender and juicy as could be. The legs braised, mixed with a bit of foie gras and stuffed inside a cube of celery root confit, and some few little pommes dauphines. Exceptional.
post #23591 of 25454
well that sounds pretty damned good.
post #23592 of 25454
NYC lunch recommendation?

somewhere where I might be able to sneak in at the bar solo and order some things a la cart or go prix fixe?

does Le Bernardin require a jacket at lunch?
Edited by otc - 8/29/13 at 7:08am
post #23593 of 25454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

well that sounds pretty damned good.

Wine was '01 E. Guigal Côte-Rôtie Brune et Blonde. Also had an excellent Rosé from Provence with a langoustine course worth noting, Domaine Tempier Bandol 2012, as well as a '97 Domaine Hubert Lamy white burg to go with abalone. They paired dessert with a '95 Dalmore scotch aged in Rothschild casks, which was pretty interesting. The dessert was awesome (new pastry chef). Turkish coffee mousse, ginger sable, and a coffee cardamom ice cream that knocked my socks off.
post #23594 of 25454
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

NYC lunch recommendation?

Jean Georges
post #23595 of 25454
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

Wine was '01 E. Guigal Côte-Rôtie Brune et Blonde.
good, solid Rhone wine, and I appreciate the age on this one
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

'97 Domaine Hubert Lamy white burg
no premox?
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