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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 1496

post #22426 of 25578
That Maxim is probably the nicest I've seen, though I can't figure out why people like them in the first place. Sauce looks good, steak looks so European. Our fat doesn't make that color, but almost all Euro steaks do.
post #22427 of 25578
manton started the pommes maxim trend on here i think
post #22428 of 25578
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

That Maxim is probably the nicest I've seen, though I can't figure out why people like them in the first place. Sauce looks good, steak looks so European. Our fat doesn't make that color, but almost all Euro steaks do.
I chose the one with the nicest marbling at the wholesale which ended up being a German one (Simmentaler). They also had Irish Angus and "American". Well, all in all the meat/fat had good flavour, but it behaved weirdly during cooking. I rarely cook steak, but I prepared it as always (clean, pat dry, bring to room temperature, pat dry, season, sear, rest). Lots of juices ran out during the searing itself. I don't remember this happening before, but then again it's been a while since I've cooked a rib eye. Could've been more tender too. Meh.

The pepper sauce is quite interesting. Basically, you cook a lot (like 25g) of pepper in clarified butter until the peppercorns "pop", add half a shallot and a small clove of garlic (both diced). Cook until translucent, then add 100ml port wine (I didn't have any) and 125ml stock. Add a sprig of thyme and rosemary. Reduce by half, season with salt, (sugar), vinegar. Blend everything together. I tried, but the peppercorns just ended up flying across the kitchen so I just let it infuse a little further and strained it. Reduced, deglazed the pan the steaks were cooked in, bound with starch and added the juices that ran out of the steaks during resting. Tasted good.
post #22429 of 25578
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

manton started the pommes maxim trend on here i think

Mike and Max both love them.
post #22430 of 25578
they are useful for certain dishes when you want a little crunch and some starch but not much
post #22431 of 25578
For those on the edge of their seats I picked an 09 Elyse wine, L'Ingenue which is a white Rhone blend. Went well.
post #22432 of 25578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

For those on the edge of their seats I picked an 09 Elyse wine, L'Ingenue which is a white Rhone blend. Went well.

How did it work out?
post #22433 of 25578
It was excellent. The braised pork belly never disappoints and I found a very lean one. The wine went well but the label was vexing. Does not mention what varietals but says it's a blend of four white Rhones. I'm thinking Marsanne, Rousanne (just because), Viognier (nose) and I have no idea what else.
post #22434 of 25578
post #22435 of 25578
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehkay View Post

This? http://www.elysewinery.com/trade_94_990319106.pdf

Damn, I'm good. nod[1].gif
post #22436 of 25578
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

It was great. Oddly, it was less simple to make the custard mixture than I thought. Perhaps it was that my hand was bandaged up (see other thread) but I fucked it up once, and nearly the second time, though it ended up coming together at the last minute. You have to make sure the cream is warm and that the foie gras and eggs are room temp or you will get gunky whipped foie gras butter and a little liquid runoff. At least, that was my experience.

Funny that you mention that (not the nearly cutting off your hand part). Maybe it's just me, but one thing I've noticed about the French cookbooks thus far, is they're a lot more vague about certains things and asume the cook using them knows more than what is assumed in American cookbooks. Coming from TK books, this was a bit frustrating at first, but now I find it more as a welcome challenge.
post #22437 of 25578
I hate following recipes in Keller books. The way the recipe for pastry cream in the Bouchon Bakery book is written made me want to gouge my eyes out.
post #22438 of 25578
I can no longer tolerate cook books that measure by volume rather than weight.
post #22439 of 25578
Do you think it would be better to pass them through a tamis, or chinois afterwards?
post #22440 of 25578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I can no longer tolerate cook books that measure by volume rather than weight.

What, you don't like measuring 1/4 cup of sliced onions?
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