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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 1471

post #22051 of 25543
i think those videos are amazing. thanks so much for turning me on to them.
post #22052 of 25543
He is such a nutter. In the best way, though.
post #22053 of 25543
i'm trying to remember if i've ever seen a top chef wear sanitary gloves in his own kitchen.
post #22054 of 25543
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

i'm trying to remember if i've ever seen a top chef wear sanitary gloves in his own kitchen.

I think it is as much for a little heat resistance as for anything else. I've never seen anybody with his hands inside hot pans as much as he has them there.
post #22055 of 25543
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I think it is as much for a little heat resistance as for anything else. I've never seen anybody with his hands inside hot pans as much as he has them there.
that's a good point. he always makes a big point of how he cooks at very low heat, but no heat is that low! i've never used those in that way ... pretty much only to protect my hands when i'm working with a lot of chiles.
post #22056 of 25543
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

that's a good point. he always makes a big point of how he cooks at very low heat, but no heat is that low! i've never used those in that way ... pretty much only to protect my hands when i'm working with a lot of chiles.

I'm just guessing, but I know I can do dishes in super, super hot water with nitrile gloves on when it makes be shirk back without them. It does look a little "lady with a hair net in the school cafeteria" though, doesn't it?
post #22057 of 25543
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I'm just guessing, but I know I can do dishes in super, super hot water with nitrile gloves on when it makes be shirk back without them. It does look a little "lady with a hair net in the school cafeteria" though, doesn't it?
yeah, and that kitchen is so funky. love the whiteboard with chores behind him on the shots. it's so unusual to see a real kitchen in these things.
post #22058 of 25543
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

yeah, and that kitchen is so funky. love the whiteboard with chores behind him on the shots. it's so unusual to see a real kitchen in these things.

There is this great segment of the old Great Chefs of France series from the early 90s where he is going on about a new egg topper he found, and he starts telling the camera that if they don't exist in the US, then people should just call Arpege and they will send the toppers to them.
post #22059 of 25543
post #22060 of 25543
It was great. I agree with your article. I have the France DVDs and sometimes I'll watch while I ride the bike.
post #22061 of 25543
i remember years and years ago ... oh dear ... this was when VHS first came out ... and there was this weird guy in New York who imported a lot of French cooking shows and put them on videos. there was an amazing series with a young paul bocuse. i'd love to find those now. scoured ebay and haven't been able to. i remember spoonfuls of creme fraiche so rich they looked like whipped cream.
post #22062 of 25543
I went to a Burgundy "Insight" dinner last night.

The first course was "orange-yuzu marinated sea scallop, kushi oyster, pickled buddha's hand lemon, shiso oil, sea lettuce, chayote". Honestly, what a mess. The dish was basically three slices of scallops with a little chopped oyster, and then a second slice of scallop placed on top. The dish had too much going on, and there was no real distinct harmony of flavor, or rather no distinct flavors at all. A touch of sea salt would have been greatly utilized. I am just getting over a cold, so perhaps my taste buds are still supressed. That said, the other problem with the dish was the mediocre quality of the scallops. They did not possess that wonderful sweet, brininess that a truly fresh sea scallop has, and were more of a texture with a hint of orange marinade. Not so appealing. The wines paired with this course were a 2002 Domaine Jobard Bourgogne Blanc, which I felt went quite well with the dish, in theory, and an 08 Domaine Jobard Meursalt 1er Cru "Genevriéres", which I found a wonderful nutty quality to that would have paired excellently with high quality sea scallops.

Next dish was "black truffle studded sweetbread, celery confit, black trumpet mushroom, parsley root, spinach subric, Périgueux Sauce". This was nice, though you could hardly call the sweetbreads "black truffle studded", and they were a touch overcooked for my taste. In fact, whenever I've eaten sweetbreads in NY restaurants, I've felt they are overcooked, but perhaps I am just in favor of them cooked a bit under. The mushrooms were great, the parsley puree went well on the sweetbreads, and the "subric" (which is like a little cubed custard of spinach) was not really seasoned well. The wines with this were a 2007 Domaine Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet, which I did not enjoy as much as I had expected to, and a Domaine Pierre-Yves Colin-Morey Puligny Montrachet 1er Cru "Champs Gain" 2001, which had a nose like stinky cheese and was delicious. I preferred this to the Leflaive, which was probably too young and ultimately a let down.

Third course was "pumpkin seed and speck ham crusted monkfish, caramelized endive, jerusalem artichoke, doppelbock beer jus". This was pretty good, and probably my favorite dish of the night. The monkfish was cooked perfectly and actually tasted like monkfish (I had a bacon-wrapped presentation of monkfish at Per Se which was overpowered, and tasted like nothing) This was balanced quite well, though the Japanese woman sitting to my left did not care for the combination of ham and fish, and I can understand why. However, the smokiness and richness of the speck helped to balance the subtle sweetness of the fish, and gave it a very rich, savory essence which allowed it to be paired well with such a rich jus and also 2 red wines. My only complaint was that someones hand was a bit too heavy with placing the micro-red amaranth on top of the fish, and it got stuck in my teeth on a few bites. With this was Domaine Cathiard Chambolle Musigny "Les Clos de L'Orme" 2000 and Domaine Mugneret-Gibourg Echézeau Grand Cru 1994. The '94 was the better of the two.

Then cheese, which was a Tomme de Savoie Fermiére, 18 month Comté (very nice), Epoisses. They served some very sad watercress with this and three grapes on the vine. The raisin bread also was not very good, and I can buy better from my bakery. With these was a Domaine Drouhin Beaune 1er Cru "Clos de Mouches" 1999 and Maison Jadot Pommard 1er Cru "Pezerolles" 1999. I can't remember anything about either of these.

They didn't serve dessert. Honestly, this was probably the worst dinner in terms of both food, wine and presentation. It was not nearly as insightful as the title would have suggested. Boulud is over at the Bocuse d'Or and I guess has better things to worry about.
post #22063 of 25543
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

I went to a Burgundy "Insight" dinner last night.

The first course was "orange-yuzu marinated sea scallop, kushi oyster, pickled buddha's hand lemon, shiso oil, sea lettuce, chayote".

how very Burgundian.
post #22064 of 25543
also, I probably wouldn't characterize the Leflaive as too young, though 2007 has struck me as a fairly subtle year in P-M.


The Drouhin is an excellent wine.
post #22065 of 25543
Yes, subtle. But much too subtle for me to actually enjoy it.
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