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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 1468

post #22006 of 25229
A nearby farm has been growing some extremely delicious spinach in their greenhouse for the past few months. The leaves are tender, but not flimsy, mild in flavor; the stalks are crisp and sweet. Very sweet. It is unlike any spinach I've ever tasted, and is easily the best spinach I have yet to eat in my 21 years of life. I have been buying 5 pounds a week and making salads from it and eating it with everything from lamb to fish. When cooked it remarkably retains all its sweetness, and develops a wonderfully subtle, nutty flavor. It is not aggressively vegetal or bitter like some of the West coast spinach I've eaten. Today, I wilted a pound or so gently in some olio nuovo, then I added a few spoons of creme fraiche and let it simmer for a minute, then I emulsified in a bit of black truffle butter I had made a few weeks ago which just perfumed the entire pan. On the plate, I made a circle of veal jus broken with a bit more of olio nuovo, plopped on the spinach, spooned over the reduced pan juices, and grated over some aged parmesan, which kind of just enrobed the spinach as it melted. I enjoyed it as I would enjoy a piece of meat, and I cannot say I have ever walked away from a meal so satisfied by a leafy green vegetable.
AppleMark
post #22007 of 25229
Yeah, I would eat that.
post #22008 of 25229
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

A nearby farm has been growing some extremely delicious spinach in their greenhouse for the past few months. The leaves are tender, but not flimsy, mild in flavor; the stalks are crisp and sweet. Very sweet. It is unlike any spinach I've ever tasted, and is easily the best spinach I have yet to eat in my 21 years of life. I have been buying 5 pounds a week and making salads from it and eating it with everything from lamb to fish. When cooked it remarkably retains all its sweetness, and develops a wonderfully subtle, nutty flavor. It is not aggressively vegetal or bitter like some of the West coast spinach I've eaten. Today, I wilted a pound or so gently in some olio nuovo, then I added a few spoons of creme fraiche and let it simmer for a minute, then I emulsified in a bit of black truffle butter I had made a few weeks ago which just perfumed the entire pan. On the plate, I made a circle of veal jus broken with a bit more of olio nuovo, plopped on the spinach, spooned over the reduced pan juices, and grated over some aged parmesan, which kind of just enrobed the spinach as it melted. I enjoyed it as I would enjoy a piece of meat, and I cannot say I have ever walked away from a meal so satisfied by a leafy green vegetable.
AppleMark
drool.gif

I kind of fancy some spinach now. Unfortunately, at the same time, it reminds me of the dreadful "vegetable" I've seen at a supermarket two days ago which they dared to call "spinach". Anyway, I'll try to find some decent one.
post #22009 of 25229
i think what you've got there is a variety of spinach called Bloomsdale. it's really terrific. great flavor; holds shape. maybe the most notable thing about it is that it is almost totally lacking in that tannic quality most raw spinach has.
eta: there's a great spinach recipe I've never tried ... comes from a reference to a recipe by Brillat Savarin, someone found it in an old (1920s) french cooking magazine: basically, you melt the spinach with butter. then you refrigerate it. the next day you melt it again, with more butter. then you refrigerate it. then you do that again. sounds like you wind up with something like a spinach flavored butter quenelle. but yeah. spinach. butter. love.
post #22010 of 25229
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

i think what you've got there is a variety of spinach called Bloomsdale. it's really terrific. great flavor; holds shape. maybe the most notable thing about it is that it is almost totally lacking in that tannic quality most raw spinach has.
eta: there's a great spinach recipe I've never tried ... comes from a reference to a recipe by Brillat Savarin, someone found it in an old (1920s) french cooking magazine: basically, you melt the spinach with butter. then you refrigerate it. the next day you melt it again, with more butter. then you refrigerate it. then you do that again. sounds like you wind up with something like a spinach flavored butter quenelle. but yeah. spinach. butter. love.

I think you're right. I will ask the grower the next time I see him. It's embarrassing I didn't even think to ask which variety it is. It's just been exciting to have something like this to cook with when the rest of the farmer's market is so dull and starchy.
post #22011 of 25229
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

I think you're right. I will ask the grower the next time I see him. It's embarrassing I didn't even think to ask which variety it is. It's just been exciting to have something like this to cook with when the rest of the farmer's market is so dull and starchy.
yeah, except for all that great citrus. and the strawberries are really starting to come in sweet. oh, wait, you don't live in socal, do you?
post #22012 of 25229
my farmer's market is full of hydroponic stuff.










It's really delightful and exciting.
post #22013 of 25229
Lunch: Pulpo a la plancha.
Dinner: Chicken braised with rosemary and lemon juice
post #22014 of 25229
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

yeah, except for all that great citrus. and the strawberries are really starting to come in sweet. oh, wait, you don't live in socal, do you?

I've been buying a lot citrus lately. Mandarins, cara cara oranges, mineolas, and tons of kumquats. Didn't know strawberries started this early, even in the West.
post #22015 of 25229
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

I've been buying a lot citrus lately. Mandarins, cara cara oranges, mineolas, and tons of kumquats.
we appreciate your support in solving our budget issues.
Quote:
Didn't know strawberries started this early, even in the West.
they're pretty much year-round now, starting in the desert, north sandiego county, orange county, ventura county ... working the way up the coast as the weather warms. only time they're not very good is august-october when the heat really takes its toll. or weeks like we've just had when there's a lot of rain.
post #22016 of 25229
The freak morels of January.


post #22017 of 25229
How'd they taste? Did you break out the vin jaune?
post #22018 of 25229
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

How'd they taste? Did you break out the vin jaune?

Really nice, and not too sandy at all like most early morels are. And yes, vin jaune and the white sauce is vin jaune too. Can't have morels and chicken without your vin jaune.
post #22019 of 25229
Interesting. I like the way the chicken is sliced. Beautifully golden, too. I assume that is the product of your rotisserie. I have been bored of the chickens I can get around here. I am receiving some poularde later this week from Four Story Hill which I look forward to trying.
post #22020 of 25229
Thanks, no it was just cooked in a pan on top of the stove on the crown. Interested to hear how the poulardes are. I always forget the difference between the various types of birds. Poulardes are hens, I know, but how are they different from other hens?
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