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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 1407

post #21091 of 25354
does it matter how much salt you use? can you oversalt?

also can i do the same thing with turnips?
post #21092 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

The Senateur version looks more appealing to me (although that might be because it has a passing resemblance to the Korean moonpies of my youth). Sounds like a dish that's right up my alley--I love blood and liver. But one glance at a recipe I found online (one that calls for "torn ears" on the hare and directs the cook to "paunch the hare") made me quickly realize that I'd be completely incapable of making this even if I were feeling particularly adventurous.

It's actually pretty straightforward. You take the front and back legs of the hare, wrap them in pork fat and cook them in red wine with 20 cloves of garlic and 15 shallots in a 300 oven for 6 hours. Then you take the bones out, strain the sauce and let it cool overnight. The next day, you grind up 10 more cloves of garlic and 6 more shallots with the liver, heart and lungs of the hare, and you simmer for another hour. Then you strain, and thicken the sauce with blood (hare or pig) and a little cream, and some foie gras if you have it, then warm the cooked hare in the sauce. It's heavy, rich, fragrant etc. But it's really great.
post #21093 of 25354
ajvko.jpg
post #21094 of 25354
which book is that? (passard?)
post #21095 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

does it matter how much salt you use? can you oversalt??

Not if you're God. lol8[1].gif
post #21096 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

Not if you're God. lol8[1].gif

What do you think of shuto?
post #21097 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

which book is that? (passard?)
An old-ish book called Haute Cuisine Paris. It has a bunch of interviews and then 3 recipes apiece from like 8 or so chefs.

That is from the Arpege section.

http://www.amazon.com/Haute-Cuisine-Paris-Etoiles-English/dp/9685336369
post #21098 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

It's actually pretty straightforward. You take the front and back legs of the hare, wrap them in pork fat and cook them in red wine with 20 cloves of garlic and 15 shallots in a 300 oven for 6 hours. Then you take the bones out, strain the sauce and let it cool overnight. The next day, you grind up 10 more cloves of garlic and 6 more shallots with the liver, heart and lungs of the hare, and you simmer for another hour. Then you strain, and thicken the sauce with blood (hare or pig) and a little cream, and some foie gras if you have it, then warm the cooked hare in the sauce. It's heavy, rich, fragrant etc. But it's really great.

You know what? Fuck it, I'm going to try this exactly as you describe at some point this winter. I'll probably mess it up, but it'll be a glorious mess. I can get a hare from the organic butcher in town.
post #21099 of 25354
There's a guy at my farmer's market that has whole rabbits (I assume that's the same as hare - or am I missing something crucial here?), but not sure where to get blood. I suppose either that farmer or my butcher can get that easily enough.

edit: google says they're different animals. Not sure how different for the purposes of cooking.
post #21100 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

What do you think of shuto?

I don't go for that stuff. My seafood tastes are like clothed Christian pretend sex. I can't do anything too strongly fishy.
post #21101 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron View Post

There's a guy at my farmer's market that has whole rabbits (I assume that's the same as hare - or am I missing something crucial here?), but not sure where to get blood. I suppose either that farmer or my butcher can get that easily enough.
edit: google says they're different animals. Not sure how different for the purposes of cooking.

Wild mountain hare is quite different, in both taste and appearance, from a farmed rabbit. Hare meat is dark red, rich and gamey in flavor (slightly sweet, IMO, but not as powerful as something like grouse). Rabbit looks white, like a chicken, and isn't very particular in taste. Hare is delicious, and absolutely worth making if you can find it.
post #21102 of 25354
So hare is typically wild then? I'm not sure where to find any wild game (I've been wanting to get my hands on some wild boar) but I'll look around.
post #21103 of 25354
Rabbit is great in Spanish cuisine or so. It has a nice flavor and nice structure but it's definitely not nearly as "intense" as hare. That recipe sounds terrific but I can't do it for the next couple of years. Or maybe when I visit my parents for a longer time. We'll see.
post #21104 of 25354
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron View Post

So hare is typically wild then? I'm not sure where to find any wild game (I've been wanting to get my hands on some wild boar) but I'll look around.

Yes. The hare we're discussing is always wild. You can go through d'Artagnan, but I wouldn't recommend it. The best game supplier is Solex out of Manhattan. They do mostly wholesale. If you'd like to order anything, just let me know, or shoot them an email.
post #21105 of 25354
Here is an awesome comparison video:
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