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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 2

post #16 of 25350
~Homemade pizza on wholewheat dough with garlic, onions, rosemary porchetta, capicola, red and yellow peppers, and fresh mozzarella and a smoked gouda ~BBQ Chicken breast with homemade dry-rub ~Steamed string beans with a sundried tomato and pesto dressing ~2 yogurt cups for dessert A.
post #17 of 25350
Thread Starter 
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(globetrotter @ Jan. 31 2005,13:54) stu, what does the next generation eat when you are eating all the spicy stuff?
I only cook like that when I am alone. Neither the wife nor kid can tolerate the taste of that, or even the smell for that matter. I'm staying at my house in Florida right now on business, so I'm living it up while I do so.
Scotch Bonnet peppers. I remember cooking with those, three years ago, after a visit to a local farmer's market. Not knowing the potency, I used half of one in a Cambodian stir-fry. Husband, father, and two cats had to be evacuated. Everyone coughing and dreading me. My father, who grew up in post-war France and wouldn't let a crumb go to waste, said we could "rescue" the dish. We added rice, more rice, and then red peppers for sweetness. A few tomatoes from the garden were sacrificed. My father was in charge of the burial.
post #18 of 25350
Tonight, Ground chicken and filet mignon kabobs with basamti rice and salad. Cornish Hen. Starbucks iced white chocolate mocha.
post #19 of 25350
Had lunch at Bouchon in Yountville, so skipped dinner. Lunch was: Trotters Blood Sausage Phelps Shiraz Coffee. Sublime...
post #20 of 25350
Bouchon is good stuff, I just ate there in Vegas (apparently Keller was there) Fabienne, Have you had Bresse chicken?
post #21 of 25350
Thread Starter 
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Fabienne, Have you had Bresse chicken?
Are you knowingly trying to torture me? Why do you ask such questions, when all supermarkets offer is perdue chicken? Yes, of course, I've had poulet de Bresse. That's all my mother ever buys.
post #22 of 25350
I used to smuggle them home - I would go to a market on my way to the airport and get a chicken and some various sausages, once a pheasant, put them in a soft ice pack in my suitcase and cook dinner when I got home. Once I brought enough sausages and beer for a large party that way, coming home from germany.
post #23 of 25350
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I used to smuggle them home - I would go to a market on my way to the airport and get a chicken and some various sausages, once a pheasant, put them in a soft ice pack in my suitcase and cook dinner when I got home. Once I brought enough sausages and beer for a large party that way, coming home from germany.
I've done similar things, but I have never tried fresh meat, I have to bow. You know the point that the customs officer asks you if you have any foie gras, any meats, any bread, etc...? And you answer no, trying to look angelic? And he decides that your suitcase is going to go through the machine? Twice now, the officers have looked at each other, upon examining my suitcase, smiled and let me go. They've never confiscated any of my purchases. I find it helps if you wear a business suit. Even if you visit family, it's always a business trip, when the immigration officer asks.
post #24 of 25350
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Scotch Bonnet peppers.  I remember cooking with those, three years ago, after a visit to a local farmer's market.  Not knowing the potency, I used half of one in a Cambodian stir-fry.  Husband, father, and two cats had to be evacuated.....
They are I believe the hottest peppers in the universe, even marginally hotter than the famed Mexican Habanero. If you know what you are getting into when you eat them, and are thus prepared, they are great. They make a great simple table sauce if you chop up about 5 of them, mix them with some key lime juice and salt. They also pair well with mango and papaya and cilantro for a nice fruity hot sauce that dresses grilled fish. I can see how they wouldn't have worked with the Cambodian stir fry, though. You either have to pair them with something citrusy or build them into a complex forumla of flavors so the heat blends rather than dominates.
post #25 of 25350
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(globetrotter @ Feb. 01 2005,08:18) I used to smuggle them home - I would go to a market on my way to the airport and get a chicken and some various sausages, once a pheasant, put them in a soft ice pack in my suitcase and cook dinner when I got home. Once I brought enough sausages and beer for a large party that way, coming home from germany.
I've done similar things, but I have never tried fresh meat, I have to bow.  You know the point that the customs officer asks you if you have any foie gras, any meats, any bread, etc...?  And you answer no, trying to look angelic?  And he decides that your suitcase is going to go through the machine?  Twice now, the officers have looked at each other, upon examining my suitcase, smiled and let me go.  They've never confiscated any of my purchases. I find it helps if you wear a business suit.  Even if you visit family, it's always a business trip, when the immigration officer asks.
the only time I have ever been busted was when I tried to get 3 boxes of orchids from thailand through. I basically had a big white bag that said Bankok duty free, that looked like 3 flower boxes, on my luggage cart. but you can get fantastic orchids for about $25 per 100 or so buds. Last year I brought a piece of spainish ham through that lasted me just under a year. mmmmm.....
post #26 of 25350
Thread Starter 
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Originally Posted by Fabienne,Jan. 31 2005,20:07
Scotch Bonnet peppers.  I remember cooking with those, three years ago, after a visit to a local farmer's market.  Not knowing the potency, I used half of one in a Cambodian stir-fry.  Husband, father, and two cats had to be evacuated.....
They are I believe the hottest peppers in the universe, even marginally hotter than the famed Mexican Habanero.  If you know what you are getting into when you eat them, and are thus prepared, they are great. They make a great simple table sauce if you chop up about 5 of them, mix them with some key lime juice and salt. They also pair well with mango and papaya and cilantro for a nice fruity hot sauce that dresses grilled fish. I can see how they wouldn't have worked with the Cambodian stir fry, though. You either have to pair them with something citrusy or build them into a complex forumla of flavors so the heat blends rather than dominates.
So you use them primarily without cooking them?  I think that was my mistake, the fact that I cooked my one half on high heat and the fumes engulfed the whole house. As for the subject of children, my son surprises me: he will eat spicy food without batting an eyelash.  We have Indian friends, and he loves the crunchy snacks that they are so fond of.  And other times, he wants pasta or peas with nothing on.  Last night, he had boursin (cheese heavy on garlic and herbs).  Then went on to a strong goat cheese.
post #27 of 25350
This probably doesn't sound appetizing, but it was very tasty: "Mexican" casserole -- diced chicken, w/corn, bean, peppers and other "stuff" and herbs/spices, topped with tortillas slathered in some kind of smoky/spicy sauce. Homemade by my amazing wife. Lots left for a couple days of no-cost lunches. green salad day-old (but warmed up) homemade biscuits 1997 Foppiano petite sirah (Napa) orange popsicle as dessert
post #28 of 25350
Thread Starter 
Quote:
This probably doesn't sound appetizing, but it was very tasty: "Mexican" casserole -- diced chicken, w/corn, bean, peppers and other "stuff" and herbs/spices, topped with tortillas slathered in some kind of smoky/spicy sauce.  Homemade by my amazing wife.  Lots left for a couple days of no-cost lunches. green salad day-old (but warmed up) homemade biscuits 1997 Foppiano petite sirah (Napa) orange popsicle as dessert
We're also big on leftovers. The only problem with that is, drawn by the aromas, curious co-workers ask many questions. Giving out the name is never enough, you get into an explanation, and your dish gets cold in the meantime. Sometimes, I like a little privacy with my food.
post #29 of 25350
Grilled chicken on Romaine lettuce with goat cheese, red peppers and homemade vinagrette dressing. 1 glass of unremarkable chianti after dinner
post #30 of 25350
Geez - I am pretty boring... last night - Chili made by my wife with ground beef, canned tomatoes and chili seasonings - eaten with saltine crackers Glass of milk Bradford
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