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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 972

post #14566 of 25373
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

+1
Now it all makes more sense..
I guess gratulations are in order, mm. Let the champagne flow! Though, tbh, I didn't have that much a doubt that edina would choose you.
FWIW, the decision each year comes down to an elite group of the Inner Circle. And I can say, to give you all a glimpse into what the life of a StyleForvm superstar is like, that MGM was the only unanimous decision to come from the group in quite some time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

ps: foodguy i just bought your book. it's really cheap on amazon right now (is that a bad thing? frown.gif)
Bought the book? How 1%. I just asked him for an autographed copy and ended up getting two books for free. Ballin!

*cue people from across the globe googling his books, finding this thread, and subsequently filling his inbox with requests for autographed copies.*
post #14567 of 25373
Non sequitur: Wanted to have dinner last night at Julienne in Santa Barbara following fg's emphatic recommendation, but ended up at (the non-TK) Bouchon because my friends really like it. Lobster bisque and venison loin + brussels sprouts and a mustardy parsnip puree. Everything was fine; nothing was exciting or memorable. The ice cream from some popular local joint was good.

Tonight: first dinner in Seattle (ever, since it's my first time here).
post #14568 of 25373
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

it's been awhile. i dont really use hon dashi, but when i tasted the pellets i didnt think it was particularly fishy. tbh the only times i used it in cooking was at my parent's place where i added it afterwards in stews to give things a richer taste. i just didnt think it would taste that fishy with hon dashi instead of msg but i guess it's dependent on how much you put in

I think there might be some level of you having a palate that savors a fishy taste, having grown up with Korean food (which is largely seasoned and fermented with seafood) and the fishiness just doesn't recoil in your mouth the same way it does for me, and so you aren't picking up on it. (this is what I was hinting at with the MSG and pho - all those Asian yelpers and reveiwers probably eat buckets of MSG daily anyway, how are they gonna be able to tell of the pho they're eating doesn't use MSG or not? how many of them really cook, to know anyway?)

I don't eat seafood or fish regularly and grew up not eating it at all hardly, not even trace amounts, so I taste fishiness very strongly and can pick it out of anything. It's obsessive. I don't mind eating fish or seafood if it's to be fish or seafood, just not really into Asian foods using the fish to boost the salt or umami because of the aftertaste. I don't like kimchi or dishes with raw nuoc mam, for example.

It probably sounds like a ridiculous theory to people, but I've spent 10 years in Asia eating with others, asking them if they can taste what I am tasting - usually no one can unless they're in the same position as me, not having grown up eating food salted with fish/seafood, so foreigners, usually. To me, it's ridiculous - somebody will eat a really fishy piece of kimchi or a banchan salted with cod roe, and I'll say 'do you taste the seafood in that?' and they will say 'no, not at all' - and if I try eating it, I usually have to put it down, it's always very strongly fishy. This is why I hardly ever eat kimchi - Koreans in Korea really like a saucy, bright red kimchi with ojinguh jeotgal - and that always rolls back on the tongue with a very strong seafood funk after the sweetness of the vegetables subsides. I like kimchijjigae because that aftertaste mellows out a lot, but it's still always there, at least with the first couple bites.
post #14569 of 25373
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post

233
Black pepper tofu.

Looks interesting, like a western version of the Chinese mapo tofu.

If you like plain tofu, I recommend trying this brand Otokomae Tofu. It's not the best in Japan, but for what's available in the U.S., it's pretty good. I've seen it sold in one of the Japanese stores (like Nijiya or Marukai) but can't remember which one for sure. (I would not recommend this type for the mabo dish though).
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

it's been awhile. i dont really use hon dashi, but when i tasted the pellets i didnt think it was particularly fishy. tbh the only times i used it in cooking was at my parent's place where i added it afterwards in stews to give things a richer taste. i just didnt think it would taste that fishy with hon dashi instead of msg but i guess it's dependent on how much you put in

I would be surprised if they used hon dashi in pho, but who knows what's in there smile.gif I notice after eating pho my throat always feels weird, probably because they put in some sort of chemical like MSG.
post #14570 of 25373
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post

I have to say that having fully looked through that book, there is nothing I want to make from it.
What don't you like? Just The sheer number of components in each dish?
post #14571 of 25373
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post

I always wondered about that. So Pho is actually a fairly recent invention, I had an idea that that might be the case, but I wasn't sure.

I think that the french colonization is what makes vietnamese food so good. They have all of these fresh flavors and ideas that you don't really see in other asian cuisines (at least the parts of them that make it to the US). It seems to be exemplified the most in the bahn mi...but it shows up elsewhere.
post #14572 of 25373
Wiki sez: The dish is associated with the city of Hanoi, where the first pho restaurant opened in the 1920s....Phở originated in the early 20th century in northern Vietnam.[2] The specific place of origin appears to be southwest of Hanoi in Nam Dinh province, then a substantial textile market, where cooks sought to please both Vietnamese (with local rice noodles, of Chinese origin)[3] and French tastes (cattle were beasts of burden before the French arrived, not usually a source of beef).

Interesting.
post #14573 of 25373
I had a terrible restaurant dinner tonight at a place called villa. The salad was inoffensive, but the main was tasteless. It was chicken stuffed with asiago, "caremelized" onions, and spinach in a grain mustard sauce (with the same crust) that was served with garlic mashed potatoes with seasonal vegetables (which ended up being green beans). It was served as if from a trough. The beans were in a pile on a huge mound of mash and i could hardly taste the chicken, or the sauce, or anything distinctly, really. It was just a big mess. Cheapo italian places always seem to suck.
post #14574 of 25373
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

I think there might be some level of you having a palate that savors a fishy taste, having grown up with Korean food (which is largely seasoned and fermented with seafood) and the fishiness just doesn't recoil in your mouth the same way it does for me, and so you aren't picking up on it. (this is what I was hinting at with the MSG and pho - all those Asian yelpers and reveiwers probably eat buckets of MSG daily anyway, how are they gonna be able to tell of the pho they're eating doesn't use MSG or not? how many of them really cook, to know anyway?)
I don't eat seafood or fish regularly and grew up not eating it at all hardly, not even trace amounts, so I taste fishiness very strongly and can pick it out of anything. It's obsessive. I don't mind eating fish or seafood if it's to be fish or seafood, just not really into Asian foods using the fish to boost the salt or umami because of the aftertaste. I don't like kimchi or dishes with raw nuoc mam, for example.
It probably sounds like a ridiculous theory to people, but I've spent 10 years in Asia eating with others, asking them if they can taste what I am tasting - usually no one can unless they're in the same position as me, not having grown up eating food salted with fish/seafood, so foreigners, usually. To me, it's ridiculous - somebody will eat a really fishy piece of kimchi or a banchan salted with cod roe, and I'll say 'do you taste the seafood in that?' and they will say 'no, not at all' - and if I try eating it, I usually have to put it down, it's always very strongly fishy. This is why I hardly ever eat kimchi - Koreans in Korea really like a saucy, bright red kimchi with ojinguh jeotgal - and that always rolls back on the tongue with a very strong seafood funk after the sweetness of the vegetables subsides. I like kimchijjigae because that aftertaste mellows out a lot, but it's still always there, at least with the first couple bites.

i think this is pretty spot on analysis. i spent like 7, 8 years in korea growing up and i didnt know until a few years ago that kimchi uses shrimp whatever to help fermentation. i grew up eating stews that used anchovies and radish in the broth. so i wouldnt be surprised if im not sensitive to fishiness
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post

Looks interesting, like a western version of the Chinese mapo tofu.
If you like plain tofu, I recommend trying this brand Otokomae Tofu. It's not the best in Japan, but for what's available in the U.S., it's pretty good. I've seen it sold in one of the Japanese stores (like Nijiya or Marukai) but can't remember which one for sure. (I would not recommend this type for the mabo dish though).
I would be surprised if they used hon dashi in pho, but who knows what's in there smile.gif I notice after eating pho my throat always feels weird, probably because they put in some sort of chemical like MSG.

from what i understand double blind controlled studies have shown that msg allergieis is largely a perception more so than an actual physical symptom. otoh considering how powerful placebos can be i dont find it wrong for people to avoid msg if it makes them feel better.
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I think that the french colonization is what makes vietnamese food so good. They have all of these fresh flavors and ideas that you don't really see in other asian cuisines (at least the parts of them that make it to the US). It seems to be exemplified the most in the bahn mi...but it shows up elsewhere.

this. love vietnamese food cuz of this. koreans got stuck with american army fusion food and post war ration food as foreign influences
post #14575 of 25373
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

yeah. hon dashi is everywhere. it tastes so damn good. that way they can claim they dont use msg but then use basicallly the same thing
I love this. There's a huge trend going on that MSG sucks. Guess what they did? Advertised products (e.g. chicken stock) with MSG-free yet at the same time significantly increased the amount of yeast extract which "naturally" (like parmiggiano, meat, ...) contains MSG.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

+1
Now it all makes more sense..
I guess gratulations are in order, mm. Let the champagne flow! Though, tbh, I didn't have that much a doubt that edina would choose you.
FWIW, the decision each year comes down to an elite group of the Inner Circle. And I can say, to give you all a glimpse into what the life of a StyleForvm superstar is like, that MGM was the only unanimous decision to come from the group in quite some time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

ps: foodguy i just bought your book. it's really cheap on amazon right now (is that a bad thing? frown.gif)
Bought the book? How 1%. I just asked him for an autographed copy and ended up getting two books for free. Ballin!

*cue people from across the globe googling his books, finding this thread, and subsequently filling his inbox with requests for autographed copies.*
^^Again, I didn't have a doubt.

^I thought about this, too, but I guess shipping from the US costs quite some money. I like autographed books.
post #14576 of 25373
Carbonara
sorbetto limone
post #14577 of 25373
Britalian, don't you have a smartphone (old-school alternative: a camera)? Would be great if you posted some pictures of your meals.
post #14578 of 25373
Ok, got a minute so I thought I'd throw up my NOLA food reviews and pics:

Flew in on the 29th and I decided I was going to do a cuban sandwich & cuban coffee taste test at MIA. Way there - La Carreta (gate D37 IIRC) - good bread, pork was a bit dry, ham was nice, but they didn't press it enough for my tastes (I like it more melted myself). 6 out of 10 Rambo's. Coffee was a bit gritty but had a nice taste.

Got in and immediately started eating. First stop - Mr. B's - We sidled up to the bar and had the fried oysters and bbq shrimp. The oysters were AMAZING. Neither of us had had fried oysters before and with the hollandaise sauce they really blew our minds. The bbq shrimp were incredible. I'd never seen shrimp that big before and I think they put crack in that sauce. I literally ate a loaf and a half of bread soaking it all up. Both winners.

Then, on to Drago's for their charbroiled oysters. I'd been asking everyone I met where to eat and this place got mentioned several times. A bit of a letdown IMO. There was too much of a burnt taste for me. Would not recommend.

30th - Woke up and hit Cafe Dumond for chicory coffee and bignets. Those things are really fucking tasty. There was a massive line outside but I walked right in and found an empty table in the restaurant. The coffee? Not so much. I really don't prefer wood in my coffee.

Then, a muffalata at Central Grocery - Tasty, but too much bread for that little meat/olive crap. A bit greasy too. A few people told me Napoleon House had better muffies so I'll have to try that next time.

For dinner we hit Mother's. No line, thankfully, and we sat down in under 10. Their crawfish etoufee was fucking incredible. Easily the best savory food I ate the entire trip. The fried chicken was a letdown. There wasn't any seasoning in the breading. I've had better down here. The Ferdi sandwich was also a miss. Basically a ham and roastbeef sub with their Debris (the meat that falls into the cooking liquid when making their roastbeef.) I suspect there was just too much going on with this thing. We had their cabbage and potato salad as sides. The cabbage was very good (probably because it had chunks of their ham in it) and the potato salad was tasty as well.

Our late night stop was Luke's. I'd been told their shrimp and grits was off the chain. It didn't disappoint. Served on a cast iron skillet it was 6 big shrimp and tiny chunks of sausage over thick cut grits. Excellent flavors. I'd eat that again in a heartbeat. Their crab bisque sucked. So did their mixed drinks. Still, the place was cozy and the food seemed good, so I'd recommend it.

31st - I'd been told that Cafe Bignet had better bignet's than Dumonde, so that was breakfast. Verdict? That guy was an asshole. Dumonde rules. But, Bignet had better coffee (mostly because they serve something other than that chicory garbage) and was a cozy little spot.

Afterwards it was onto Coop's for their rabbit and sausage jambalya and fried chicken. Chicken was better than Mother's but I still don't see what all the fuss is about. The jambalya was really good though. You couldn't really make out the rabbit flavors but it was deep and hearty. Recommended.

Dinner was oysters - First it was Acme and then Felix. At Acme we waited about 20 minutes and sat at the bar. Had a dozen oysters and half dozen charbroiled (had to give them another shot). The oysters were good, if a bit gritty, and the charbroiled weren't as bad as Drago's but still not my cup of tea. Overall, it was good but not great. I saw several people eating their fried oyster poboy's and all said they were tasty.

Ok, then we went to Felix. This is now my favorite restaurant ever. I fucking loved this place. Huge line outside but we walked right in and stood at the bar. No chairs, you stand. And they serve you the oysters on the half shell right on the bar. Plates are reserved for the "fancy folk" at the tables. They have ketchup and horseradish separate to mix your own cocktail sauce. Oysters were cheap as shit and as long as you stand there, they'll keep on dishing them out for you. The oysters were better than Acme IMO and we were just chillin at the bar rappin with the brothers. I've never seen so many fucking oysters in my life. Not even at the local markets/whole foods. It was incredible. And some of them were HUGE. I had one that took me three bites to work through. And cheap too. A dozen was $12 and, in reality, they'll end up giving you a few more than a dozen. Especially if you're nice to them.

New year's day my roommate wanted to go on a nostalgia tour, so our first stop was Mr. B's for more fried oysters. Verdict - not as good as the second time around. Then, Felix again. Even better than the first time. My boy behind the counter was there and we were chillin out for a while. Be careful over there though, before you know it they'll have served you 50 oysters. Fucking things are easy to eat! So my roommate had to leave early but I was taking the 6AM flight out. Since he's not a sweet eater I had to go on a dessert tour myself.

First stop - Emeril's. Beautiful restaurant, amazing looking food. I sat at the bar and ordered the banana cream pie. I CANNOT EXPRESS HOW FUCKING TASTY THIS IS. Easily the best dessert I've ever had. I was literally moaning at the bar while eating this. Also, probably because I'd had no sleep. But that's a story for DT.

Next - on the way back from Emeril's I hit Bon Ton Cafe - renowned city wide for their bread pudding. Also awesome. A big brick of bread pudding topped with this amazing whiskey sauce. It literally tastes like there's a bottle of whiskey in there. So fucking good.

After a quick pit stop I hit up Brennan's for banana's foster. I have to admit that this was a bit of a letdown. First off, they don't even use their own ice cream. Its Blue Bell. I hate BB ice cream (high fructose corn syrup garbage). Secondly, in reality, its just a bowl of ice cream with banana's and a brown sugar rum sauce on top. I suppose I was expecting more caramelization, or chunks of sugar, or something. It was tasty, but more for the spectacle of watching them mix it up for you.

When I got back into MIA I had a cuban and coffee at Cafe Versailles (D7 IIRC). Much better sandwich and coffee experience. I had them press it twice so it was nice and crispy on the outside and melty on the inside.

Pics later.
post #14579 of 25373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post

Ok, got a minute so I thought I'd throw up my NOLA food reviews and pics:
Flew in on the 29th and I decided I was going to do a cuban sandwich & cuban coffee taste test at MIA. Way there - La Carreta (gate D37 IIRC) - good bread, pork was a bit dry, ham was nice, but they didn't press it enough for my tastes (I like it more melted myself). 6 out of 10 Rambo's. Coffee was a bit gritty but had a nice taste.

OK, Good. I was wondering why the fuck someone who lives in Miami was posting photos some really sad looking cubanos while on a trip to new orleans...

I 'm gonna go eat a better looking cubano for lunch in 2 hours.
post #14580 of 25373
La Carreta Cuban:

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The Ferdi:

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Jumbo Oyster at Felix:

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Banana Cream Pie at Emeril's:

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Bread pudding at Bon Ton Cafe. Check the plate:

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Cuban sandwich at Cafe Versailles:

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