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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 735

post #11011 of 25380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joffrey View Post


Damn I haven't seen a watermelon with real seeds in a good while. Kind of miss them

Really?

I cut one up today.
post #11012 of 25380
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post


Pretty horrific, like I said. If you need to eat over here, just go to a department store upper floor and get your meals there. It's only a couple bucks more. They have certain standards and some liability, as well as enough money so they don't have to re-use the banchan. Seriously, there are signs in these places that proudly announce that 'we don't re-use food!' - however, I've only seen a few of these signs before... uhoh.gif

I've actually never had a case of food poisoning in Korea... but I can't say that it's always happy times in the bathroom. I eat Korean food about once or twice a month nowadays though.

Given that some hygiene things are just cultural, I wouldn't expect much more from Korean restaurants outside of Korea. There is just no culture that stops a lot of these people from going ass to hand.
I hope for better in Japan, and it is, but I guess at times there are still some 'earthy' people out there. I rarely eat other people's home cooked food as well. I get into a 'What about Bob?' mode and just shut myself in.

As mentioned before there are cup sanitizers, but I often see that they're turned off and serve no purpose other than shelving. Keep in mind that at many places all the chopsticks and spoons are stored unwrapped in a container on the table, and the diners are touching them throughout the day. A lot of restaurants don't wash up w/ hot water, and it's rare for hot water to be in a public restroom. That being said, I eat at Korean places several times a week, and I haven't experienced much gastric distress over the years. I maintain that exposure to less-than-pristine conditions has its benefits. Korea toughened my gut up for several trips to India and Nepal; I've never been sick in either country. Want to see something horrific? Visit an open-air butcher in Kathmandu. Yet I still ate the water buffalo sizzle - just not medium rare. The hyper-hygienic Japanese have overdone it and in doing so have weakened their natural resistance. If there's a public health threat in Korea it's less so hygiene and more so doctors who wildly over prescribe anti-biotics.

All in all, your best bet for good, safe dining is a busy restaurant with clean water that serves the healthy locals.
Edited by curzon - 8/29/11 at 9:16pm
post #11013 of 25380
The last few pages are why Style Forum can be great.

I made shells of lightly folded semolina flour discs, with porc enrobe sans enrobe, kale and reggiano. A little over seasoned but still good.
post #11014 of 25380
First post in here... not quite up to the standards here, but I was happy with how this turned out. The crispy skin was awesome.

I would probably shorten the cooking time a little bit next time. I prefer my pork a little pink.

I know the green beans in the final shot should have had the ends trimmed. I didn't prep them.

Porchetta:

500

500

500
post #11015 of 25380
what'd you stuff it with? looks beautiful but the white balance looks a little off
post #11016 of 25380
I actually think that, for a rustic dish like that, the green beans should be no more trimmed than they are. It all looks very good.
post #11017 of 25380
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post

I actually think that, for a rustic dish like that, the green beans should be no more trimmed than they are. It all looks very good.

+1
i think they look much better natural (heh-heh-heh).
post #11018 of 25380
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

what'd you stuff it with? looks beautiful but the white balance looks a little off

It's a pork loin that was rubbed with a mixture of fennel seed, red pepper flakes, garlic, rosemary, sage and orange slices. Then that gets wrapped with skin on pork belly and tied.

The white balance may be a touch off. These were just quick shots on the kitchen counter when it came out of the oven. The under-counter lights are fluorescent and are a nightmare for coloring. I think that, in general, it is pretty close to how it appeared, with the exception of the final one that I warmed up a bit more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post

I actually think that, for a rustic dish like that, the green beans should be no more trimmed than they are. It all looks very good.

Thanks. I agree that leaving the ends on is nice aesthetically. The only problem was that some of them were a little tough to eat.
post #11019 of 25380
That is a beautiful plate of food. Can post the recipe for the porchetta?
post #11020 of 25380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_5 View Post

That is a beautiful plate of food. Can post the recipe for the porchetta?

Sure:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Porchetta-367138
post #11021 of 25380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_5 View Post

That is a beautiful plate of food. Can post the recipe for the porchetta?

Again, we probably have one of the real US experts on Porchetta here so listen to him, not me, but I believe that, like many regional dishes, there are guidelines and not really a recipe. I certainly have seen it done a lot of ways, some great, some less so. Check out a classic Italian book.
post #11022 of 25380
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post


I believe that, like many regional dishes, there are guidelines and not really a recipe. I certainly have seen it done a lot of ways, some great, some less so. Check out a classic Italian book.

yup. almost every region of italy that eats pork (which is to say, all of them) has a version of porchetta. this one sounds very nice.
post #11023 of 25380
There was a great Saveur last year that dealt with Sicily, and the various ways classic dishes were prepared in each region. There was some brief mention of how horrified each region found another's preparations of the same dish.
post #11024 of 25380
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

There was a great Saveur last year that dealt with Sicily, and the various ways classic dishes were prepared in each region. There was some brief mention of how horrified each region found another's preparations of the same dish.

the italians are SO provincial. And every one i've ever met has been an absolutely dictatorial expert on cooking. There is one right way to prepare a dish (the way his mom fixed it, regardless of the fact that his neighbor did it different). and that town 10 miles away? that's foreign food, what could they possibly know?
on the other hand, that is what has kept regional foodways alive in Italy when they are so threatened here.
post #11025 of 25380
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post


the italians are SO provincial. And every one i've ever met has been an absolutely dictatorial expert on cooking. There is one right way to prepare a dish (the way his mom fixed it, regardless of the fact that his neighbor did it different). and that town 10 miles away? that's foreign food, what could they possibly know?
on the other hand, that is what has kept regional foodways alive in Italy when they are so threatened here.

I pray for the schmaltz and matzo ball revival.
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