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What did you eat last night for dinner? - Page 8

post #106 of 25768
Not to mention that the Romanee-Conti wine is often $1,000+ per bottle.
post #107 of 25768
Thread Starter 
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Not to mention that the Romanee-Conti wine is often $1,000+ per bottle.
1000 US$ would be a bargain.  They hover more around 2000 EUR depending on the millésime (especially those of the past 15 years).  A 1985 or a 1990 are over 4000 EUR.
post #108 of 25768
I think the latest release of DRC Romanee-Conti is about E2300, the Richebourg is in the $300-400 range though, as is the RSV. I really like these wines but wouldn't recommend them to people who aren't really into Pinot Noir because they may be a bit difficult to understand if so, especially if drank young. I would age them at least 6-10 years before drinking. After this weekend's relative extravagance, I'm going to lay low this week with my food and wine choices, although since tommorow is Chinese New Year I may celebrate by cracking open a nice Pinot (probably Central Coast)
post #109 of 25768
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Very jealous of your getting today off Tiger. a 3:00 sunday night bedtime is rough.
0630 over here my friend, not 3. In other words, if we had had to be at work at the normal report time, I would have had to miss the end of the game. The ONLY thing I miss about American television is the ability to watch a game at a normal hour. Sopranos and Alias I can get on DVD Tom
post #110 of 25768
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Man, if I was a woman, reading the list of dinner choices here, I would definitely be asking for a date somewhere....all I had was a peanut butter sandwinch, and was luck I had bread in the house for that.
Last night, Guiness floats. Tonight, lamb ragu. Any eligible women equally happy with either is welcome to apply Tom, an aspiring foodie
post #111 of 25768
Thread Starter 
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I really like these wines but wouldn't recommend them to people who aren't really into Pinot Noir
I really don't understand how you can state something like this. To me, the grape is one of the lesser factors.
post #112 of 25768
Thread Starter 
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Originally Posted by chorse123,Feb. 07 2005,13:03
Very jealous of your getting today off Tiger. a 3:00 sunday night bedtime is rough.
0630 over here my friend, not 3.  In other words, if we had had to be at work at the normal report time, I would have had to miss the end of the game.  The ONLY thing I miss about American television is the ability to watch a game at a normal hour.  Sopranos and Alias I can get on DVD Tom
Maybe you've explained before, but: was the picture for your avatar taken in Princeton?  Near campus?
post #113 of 25768
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Maybe you've explained before, but: was the picture for your avatar taken in Princeton? *Campus?
Well, *I* took it from the web, but I believe the original is from Nassau St, in front of Firestone Library. *I've always thought it was one of the prettier parts of the town, with the old sidewalks and the benches and the trees (ash?). *

The pictures that I actually took aren't always fit for public consumption...



Tom
post #114 of 25768
Thread Starter 
I'm a little lost, when I look at the picture of Princeton. I used to live across from the small cemetery.
post #115 of 25768
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Originally Posted by drizzt3117,Feb. 08 2005,12:55
I really like these wines but wouldn't recommend them to people who aren't really into Pinot Noir
I really don't understand how you can state something like this. To me, the grape is one of the lesser factors.
I think Pinot in general and Burgundy specifically is a bit harder to understand than a cabernet. One vitiner said (and I'm misquoting) Bordeaux is to Dickens as Burgundy is to Joyce, they're both great but one is harder to understand. Lunch today: 16 oz filet mignon lemon cooler cake (from Costco)
post #116 of 25768
I hate to tell you this if you haven't been back in a while, but there's nothing but a parking garage across from the cemetary now... There is a great wineshop right around the corner though, the Corkscrew. I still enjoy the e-newsletter, 4000 miles away. Tom
post #117 of 25768
Thread Starter 
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(Fabienne @ Feb. 08 2005,10:58)
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Originally Posted by drizzt3117,Feb. 08 2005,12:55
I really like these wines but wouldn't recommend them to people who aren't really into Pinot Noir
I really don't understand how you can state something like this.  To me, the grape is one of the lesser factors.
I think Pinot in general and Burgundy specifically is a bit harder to understand than a cabernet.  One vitiner said (and I'm misquoting)  Bordeaux is to Dickens as Burgundy is to Joyce, they're both great but one is harder to understand.
Aïe, aïe, aïe, now I'm even more confused. I mean, other than the fact that Pinot Noir grapes (Franc Pinot, Noirien, etc.) perhaps tend to "stay in your mouth" for a long time, and that they age very well (although they tend to turn from bright red to the color of an onion peel over time), I don't really see it. Of course, my family's origins (Burgundy) would have me quite happy with the notion that "our" wines are more complex than that of the Bordelais (the rivalry still remains), however I don't know that I would want to state that in Pauillac.
post #118 of 25768
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I hate to tell you this if you haven't been back in a while, but there's nothing but a parking garage across from the cemetary now... There is a great wineshop right around the corner though, the Corkscrew.    I still enjoy the e-newsletter, 4000 miles away.   Tom
The houses were torn down? I was on Greenview.
post #119 of 25768
Here's how I see it, and this applies to both the domestic scene and the international, so I'm going to be fairly general and refer to "cabernets" and "pinots", so we'd be primarily comparing left bank Bdx and Burgundies if taking the french wines into account. Being very general, pinot-based wines are going to be lighter bodied than cabernet based wines, and they are typically less fruit forward, with slightly less tannins, and are more floral with more subtle secondary characteristics. Cabernets have more fruit and more tannin, and are heavier bodied wines that are designed to go with lamb, beef, and heavier meats. California variants of these particular grapes typically have more fruit than their french counterparts, and typically more alcohol as well.
post #120 of 25768
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(tiger02 @ Feb. 08 2005,15:00) I hate to tell you this if you haven't been back in a while, but there's nothing but a parking garage across from the cemetary now... There is a great wineshop right around the corner though, the Corkscrew.    I still enjoy the e-newsletter, 4000 miles away.   Tom
The houses were torn down?  I was on Greenview.
Now you're really testing me...directly across from the cemetary, to the south, everything was cleared out for a garage. Can't be sure of the names, were you right across, or up the road a little bit? Greenview sounds like it would be one of the cross streets rather than the one that runs parallel to Nassau--which if memory serves is called Paul Robeson now, or at least part of it is. When were you in Princeton, if you don't mind me asking? Tom
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