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brown eggs vs white eggs - Page 2

post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by VKK3450 View Post
Why is it better that Kobe beef doesnt do any exercise and just sits around and drinks beer, but we want our chickens to go running around out in open fields?

K

Well, you don't eat cow's eggs, for one thing.
post #17 of 34
I have both white and brown eggs in the fridge and maybe it's because of the way its prepared, but I can't taste the difference between them.
post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua Arson View Post
Well, you don't eat cow's eggs, for one thing.


It wasn't a serious question.

But the free range poultry vs pen kept beef / veal argument can be made for the bird's meat also.

K
post #19 of 34
When I was growing up in NY, white eggs were preferred, for some reason. In New England, brown is the thing.
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
This is untrue. Under the same conditions (diet, health, etc) of the hen, a brown egg and a white egg should taste exactly the same. The reason farmer's market eggs will taste better is a mix of the fact that they're probably much more fresh (2-3 days old versus a week), and instead of being kept in cages and shitting all over, they're allowed to roam all the time or at least part of the time, and also the fact that with most commercially produced eggs, the hen will only be corn or grain-fed, whereas with the farmer's market egg, they will be fed a mixture of grain, corn, and grass.

i didn't say anything about white or brown

i believe the only difference is about the color is the type of chicken it comes from, as long as the chicken is cared for it will produce quality eggs.
post #21 of 34
I grew up on eggs with green shells, which are commonly laid by the Araucana breed of chicken. They look and taste the same inside.

The most nutritious and best-tasting eggs are produced by chickens that eat a combination of vegetables and insects. Next is chickens that just eat vegetables. Next is chickens that just eat grain.

The only way chickens can catch insects is being free-range and non-organic. Even chickens that just eat grain can be organic.

Free-run is entirely ethical and doesn't affect nutrition or taste.
post #22 of 34
If you let the eggs come to room temperature before you cook them, they will taste a little better.
post #23 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jared View Post

The only way chickens can catch insects is being free-range and non-organic.

I don't understand why this is so. Is it because the chicken can't be certified as organic unless you can basically attest to the provenance of everything it has eaten?
post #24 of 34
White chickens lay white eggs and brown chickens lay brown eggs. Most preferred breeds for egg laying happen to be white.
post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by VKK3450 View Post
It wasn't a serious question.

But the free range poultry vs pen kept beef / veal argument can be made for the bird's meat also.

K

It wasn't a serious answer, either
post #26 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua Arson View Post
It wasn't a serious answer, either

With a name like Joshua who could tell?

K
post #27 of 34
I can't taste any difference. I used to buy brown eggs from a lady I worked with that raised chickens.
post #28 of 34
Geeze, I was just doing some research about this and it turns out the USDA doesn't even regulate the term "free range" for eggs. I give up: the only way to get good eggs is buy them from the farmer.
post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jared View Post
Geeze, I was just doing some research about this and it turns out the USDA doesn't even regulate the term "free range" for eggs. I give up: the only way to get good eggs is buy them from the farmer.

The reason farmers would want the term "free range" or any kind of free range certification is so that consumers see it and get all excited and then are willing to pay a higher price. This all costs a nice chunk of change and a lot more inspections/regulation. I assume the difference between eggs from commercial chickens and free range chickens is pretty negligible, so it's not worth it to the farmer to pay the extra money to get free range certified.
post #30 of 34
According to Marion Nestle (America's most well known nutritionist) there is absolutely no differencein anything between the two eggs except thier shell's color.

-Remmeber reading it from her "What to Eat" book:

http://www.amazon.com/What-Eat-Mario...3532940&sr=8-1

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