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Three Button Peaked Lapel

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
In keeping with the discussion about RL, I think he is chasing the dream of Cary Grant (his personal style icon) but he can't sell that look exactly since it wont look good on just anyone. Just the same, look at how much style this man had.
post #2 of 21
Quote:
In keeping with the discussion about RL, I think he is chasing the dream of Cary Grant (his personal style icon) but he can't sell that look exactly since it wont look good on just anyone.  Just the same, look at how much style this man had.
Look at the shoulders on the coat. CG had them made longer to balance his large head, an attribute that RL shares. Great photo. Wasn't "Dexter" in "Philadelphia Story" a take-off on '30s style icon Anthony Drexel Biddle, of the horizontally striped shirts? So even Grant may have had a prior model. I don't know why all this seems somehow related to member Manton.
post #3 of 21
Quote:
I don't know why all this seems somehow related to member Manton.
What on earth do I have to do with this discussion? Love that suit, though.
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Wasn't "Dexter" in "Philadelphia Story" a take-off on '30s style icon Anthony Drexel Biddle, of the horizontally striped shirts?
Good question. I never heard that, and it never occured to me. But it makes sense: C. K. Dexter Haven ... A. J. Drexell Biddle ... could be.
post #5 of 21
Quote:
[What on earth do I have to do with this discussion?  Love that suit, though.
Only because on another post you discussed horizontally striped shirts with Alexander Kabbaz that Anthony Biddle would have worn. Never have seen any other posts on this subject on the forum. The analogy does now seem strained, at best.
post #6 of 21
Now that you mention it,CG does have a sort of cinderblock head.Handsome devil,that.I think today's so called icons fall short of the old school Hollywood.Cary Grant,Bogie,Montgomery Clift,ClarkGable-all quite dashing.
post #7 of 21
Grant also wore a KILLER peaked lapel, 3 button (or was it 2?) in "Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House". I'm going to have to go rent that one again. Not for the plot, just the clothes.
post #8 of 21
Even though I do like the 3-button peak lapel suit, I think as far as SB goes, a 1-button peak lapel jacket is the way to go. To me it signifies difference, whilst maintaining great sartorial splendor. Jon.
post #9 of 21
Goddamn, that is one amazing jacket. (Drooling...)
post #10 of 21
I gotta tell you, whether Ralph is subject to an irrational Cary Grant obsession or not, this glen plaid RL Polo suit is damn nice in person, and looks a helluvalot like something Cary would have worn: Now, as previously stated I'm not sure that everyone can pull it off, but the wool/cashmere blend on this suit is really great and the light blue overcheck looks great in person.  The kind of suit that makes you wish for a cold day to wear it.
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
The classic Tux.... http://www.angelfire.com/ma2/loireag/images/cgrant.jpg I dare say that the entire men's line is influenced by Cary Grant.
post #12 of 21
Someone tell that guy that someone cut the peaks off his lapels...
post #13 of 21
Not a big fan of notched collar tuxedos myself. Although I'm not against them in principle, I think that they lack the flair of a peaked lapel and elegance of a shawl lapel. The funny thing is that this style directly contradicts the information given on the Polo.com site: In the strictest terms, the only proper tuxedo is in black or midnight blue and is styled with either peaked lapels or a shawl collar. The former may be double-breasted. A notched lapel tuxedo, while widely available, is hardly classic. It should be tailored in pure wool barathea or piqué, and the facing on the lapels and down the outer side of each pant leg should be satin, faille or grosgrain. A well-tailored tuxedo is also finished with buttons sewn into the trouser waistband to accommodate a pair of braces as well as a loop under the left lapel for a boutonniere. Single or double-breasted formal dinner jackets in deep green, burgundy velvet, ivory wool or a subtle Black Watch tartan plaid are acceptable alternatives to a tuxedo. Both can be paired with formal trousers, which should never be cuffed. from: http://style.polo.com/askralp....on_id=6
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Not a big fan of notched collar tuxedos myself. Although I'm not against them in principle, I think that they lack the flair of a peaked lapel and elegance of a shawl lapel. The funny thing is that this style directly contradicts the information given on the Polo.com site: In the strictest terms, the only proper tuxedo is in black or midnight blue and is styled with either peaked lapels or a shawl collar. The former may be double-breasted. A notched lapel tuxedo, while widely available, is hardly classic. It should be tailored in pure wool barathea or piqué, and the facing on the lapels and down the outer side of each pant leg should be satin, faille or grosgrain. A well-tailored tuxedo is also finished with buttons sewn into the trouser waistband to accommodate a pair of braces as well as a loop under the left lapel for a boutonniere. Single or double-breasted formal dinner jackets in deep green, burgundy velvet, ivory wool or a subtle Black Watch tartan plaid are acceptable alternatives to a tuxedo. Both can be paired with formal trousers, which should never be cuffed. from: http://style.polo.com/askralp....on_id=6
Too funny. You have to love the buying public: RL tells them something to their face, sells them something else altogether and they buy it. What I don't get though, is that I f he wants more people to dress "˜appropriately' why does he sells items that he himself considers inappropriate for a particular situation? (this applies to sartorial wears only, causal is a whole other matter) Jon.
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
I'm biased. I love pretty much the entire ideal of RL & RLPL. Here's my personal recent experience however. Several years ago, I went to Brooks Brothers for the sole intention of buying a shawl colar tuxedo. I went to 45th street, I wanted the most James Bond-esque tux I could buy. The salesman, an older gentleman took me aside. Honest to god this is what he told me... 'You are too young for this (shawl collar) tuxedo. You must buy something more youthful for your fist tuxedo. I don't want you back here telling me you are angry for selling you a $1,000 tuxedo. Please go next door to J.Press and get their Tuxedo. I did, a J. Press, flat front, single button peaked lapel tux. I bought it when I was 28. I have owned it for years, worn it maybe 10 times and am certainly pleased with my purchase. That said... I can see why a young man, or a man who needs a tux for a wedding or special event and not for regular wear, might want to go more contemporary. This RL tux can be work with a formal black tie in liu of a bow tie, it has youthful flexibility. I think there is a time and a place for relaxed formal wear, particularly for a man under 40. RL sells the J.Press and the Brooks traditional line - but also caters to a crowd of up and comers who may go to museum openings or charity dinners and want a suit/tux such as the one depicted here. I like this RL tux, my friend just got it for his wedding...
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