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What clothes did you wear as a child? - Page 4

post #46 of 85
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(globetrotter @ Jan. 27 2005,11:52)
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Originally Posted by johnapril,Jan. 27 2005,11:36
I wore the hand-me-downs from the three older boys who lived katycorner to our house.  When I got older, my father took me to Brooks Brothers for a navy sportcoat and tan slacks.  The tie was navy and red thick diagonal stripes.  The shoes were penny loafers.  The haircut was a bowl over the head and removal of any hair sticking out from under the lip.  This approach to fashion prepared me for my twenties to travel abroad for extended periods, without leaving a phone number, so I could write, let my hair grow out, and dress in the simplest of rags.
no little safron robes ?
Robes worn by Burmese clergy are crimson.  Not all of the monks in the country are short or slight of stature, and so logically some of their robes are cut quite large.  I studied in Burma, and I am 6 feet tall, so if I were to have worn a robe, it would not have been saffron-colored, nor little.  The saffron-colored robes occur in the Thai and Indian clergy.  The Laotians wear a shade of golden-green. That being said, during my stint in Rangoon, I never took robes, having been merely a yogi.  Taking robes involves a deeper commitment, signified by shaving one's head, wearing robes, carrying a bowl for dana, et cetera.
yes, yes, I know, but if you are a little kid, you wear little robes, no? all kidding aside, (and totally off) 1. in some places the level of commitment of a monk is not so big, it is just a matter of doing some acts (like shaving your head and taking robes). not so Burma? 2. I have heard indian budhist robes refered to as safron, and I believe their was a term for the orangy color in Thailand (but for the life of me I don't remember). did they use the term "crimson" in Burma, or did they refer to it as something else?
post #47 of 85
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1. in some places the level of commitment of a monk is not so big, it is just a matter of doing some acts (like shaving your head and taking robes). not so Burma? 2. I have heard indian budhist robes refered to as safron, and I believe their was a term for the orangy color in Thailand (but for the life of me I don't remember). did they use the term "crimson" in Burma, or did they refer to it as something else?
Re 1. What I observed outside of the monastery was to a great degree different from what happened on the inside.  Up in Mandalay, for example, I saw monks acting pretty much like anyone else (i.e. smoking, younger ones played football, etc).  Still, the presence of monks and the monasteries in that society is important.  One example: many of the Burmese believe that honoring the monks with dana (food, clothing, etc) ensures them a better position in their next life.  Another: the priesthood is a way for parents to deal with at least some of their children's educations.  Another: I knew an orphan who was being raised by one of the monks in charge.  Another: I witnessed Burmese couples receiving marriage counseling at the monastery.  Another: many Burmese take their "vacations" at monasteries (usually a 10-day intensive meditation course).  Another: newly-wedded couples held receptions at the monastery, received blessings, and left donations. The monks at the monastery in Rangoon were on a 3-month intensive meditation course just prior to beginning several years of book study (scripture, Pali) at the religious university downtown.  Most of these men and women were from Burma.  A handful came from Laos, Thailand, Sri Lanka, and S. Korea, primarily to take advantage of the training in the Burmese system that is so much more rigorous than in their home countries.  Also, it might have been cheaper to study in Rangoon.  I stayed at the monastery for 3 months and was never asked to pay a dime (I left a donation of money). Re 2. No idea.  I did a lot less communicating in those days, and when I did, it never concerned details such as those.  Sorry I can't be of more help.
post #48 of 85
post #49 of 85
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Tokyo, That second picture from the right actually looks pretty cool.
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Quote YES those are brown velvet pants with a blue nylon coat and white knockoff nike shoes. Sue me. Don't worry about it Slim, I see hipsters all the time trying to pull off this look. You were killing shit and you were 10. A.
Thanks guys... my pimp hand has always been pretty strong.
post #50 of 85
Further fashionista recall from the early-mid 70's: I got my ear pierced in 1973 when I was 14. Back then if you got your ear pierced you were either a) a convicted felon, b) a drug addict, c) a homosexual and/or d) a pirate. I was none of the above, or at least not to the best of my recollection. I had a penchant for long, dangling earrings composed in some instances of copper wires and beads, runic talismans, etc., sometimes reaching down to my shoulder and beyond. At the time I sported an incredibly voluminous, wild and wiry judeo-afro that would have put art garfunkel, abbie hoffman et al to absolute shame. Add in the black & red glitter nail polish a la Lou Reed Transformer, torn up denim jeans and authentically distressed black leather bike jacket and you've got the complete picture to send you blue blazer and rep tie wearing prep-school wieners running for cover. Funny thing is, I was in prep school at the time...
post #51 of 85
AJL glam rules.
post #52 of 85
my wife was king enough to find this picture for me http://img214.exs.cx/img214/463/boytieboy2vk.jpg
post #53 of 85
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my wife was king enough to find this picture for me http://img214.exs.cx/img214/463/boytieboy2vk.jpg
Stylin' there globetrotter. I like how the bow tie is endearingly askew.
post #54 of 85
lots of nike's (jordans, bo jacksons, air maxes) and guess (rayons, and the overalls)!!!!
post #55 of 85
My first "style" purchase was a pair of Nike Air Trainer in 86 when they just came out. The straps in front would be called wicked, if we used that word then. They looked like this: Aside from that, it was all t-shirts and jeans from wherever it was cheap.
post #56 of 85
I wore lots of Lacoste and Nike. Thankfully I was born before the Zuba craze!
post #57 of 85
I wore lots of Benetton and Polo. My mom's choice, not mine .
post #58 of 85
I have to say, mom dressed me pretty nattily. Had an awesome chunky black ski chalet-style sweater with white snowflakes. Wore a lot of cords. Even had a dapper navy suit. Not bad for a six-year-old.

As I got older, I took to wearing old man clothes at a young age. There are pics of me in my grandfather's hat and checked trou at 10 or so.

Really, the stuff I wore then isn't that much different than what I wear now.
post #59 of 85
khaki pants, collared shirts, penny loafers/doc martins


Unless playing outside - then jeans/shorts and tshirt
post #60 of 85
Spring, summer, and fall = OP or grapevines cord shorts and le Tigre polos from Mervyns or Woolworths, w/ fake Vans from Kmart.

Winter = Flannel shirts and Wranglers from JC Penneys w/ vinyl cowboy boots (the old LV was cowboy) or 1970's velour track suits w/ the same fake Vans, or velcro sneakers (it was the '70s).

Favorite item was a baseball shirt w/ black sleeves and a tiger iron-on, bought at one of those stores in the mall.
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