or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › J. Press trousers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

J. Press trousers

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Maybe I should have asked this over at the Ask Andy forum. But I'll try here. I still would like another pair or two of nice, well-fitting trousers. And I've found that having a few pair with interesting textures/patterns can add a bit of interest to my daily work wardrobe. I've pretty much relied on online, Louis, and Brooks Brothers (surprisingly good fit on their upper end models), and I totally forgot about J. Press, even though it's a mile from me. Anyone buy J. Press trousers? Been in the store lately? I've only been in the store for a minute or two a year ago, and I remember the prices were (for me as a student) absurdly high, so I didn't really check them out. They must be on sale right now, but how much are they? Any good stuff? They are flat front, of course, but how are they cut in other respects? I'm asking because the one near me closes at 5:30 so I'm limited to going on a weekend, and if it's not worth taking a look I'd rather not bother.
post #2 of 11
Hey man, Are you going all American Trad? You'll find sturdy trousers there. A little full cut for my liking, but definitely sturdy. Those ain't no wimpy Italian Super 150s they're selling there.
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Maybe I should have asked this over at the Ask Andy forum.  But I'll try here. I still would like another pair or two of nice, well-fitting trousers.  And I've found that having a few pair with interesting textures/patterns can add a bit of interest to my daily work wardrobe.  I've pretty much relied on online, Louis, and Brooks Brothers (surprisingly good fit on their upper end models), and I totally forgot about J. Press, even though it's a mile from me. Anyone buy J. Press trousers?  Been in the store lately?  I've only been in the store for a minute or two a year ago, and I remember the prices were (for me as a student) absurdly high, so I didn't really check them out.  They must be on sale right now, but how much are they?  Any good stuff?  They are flat front, of course, but how are they cut in other respects? I'm asking because the one near me closes at 5:30 so I'm limited to going on a weekend, and if it's not worth taking a look I'd rather not bother.
I've got cords from them. I like the cut. As LA Guy suggests, they're full-ish, but not foolishly full. They're somewhere between a Barbour moleskin (which is very slim) and a Ralph Lauren trouser, which I find billowey. I haven't bought odd trousers from them in a long time. The Andover shop in Cambridge has quite a few forward, reverse, and plain front pleated trousers in cord, serge, and worsted wool. And they're all reasonably priced, and probably more so since the sale began.
post #4 of 11
Quote:
The Andover shop in Cambridge has quite a few forward, reverse, and plain front pleated trousers in cord, serge, and worsted wool. And they're all reasonably priced, and probably more so since the sale began.
Don't go to that place unless you want to be condescended to and/or have to have the salesmen hard sell you merchandise that you make casual inquiries about (happened to me when I inquired about a pair of gloves, on a separate visit than the one I documented previously.) The styles, quality, and pricepoints are just similar to those at J. Press, which is a much friendlier store (though not by Californian nor even NYC standards)
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Quote:
The Andover shop in Cambridge has quite a few forward, reverse, and plain front pleated trousers in cord, serge, and worsted wool.  And they're all reasonably priced, and probably more so since the sale began.
Don't go to that place unless you want to be condescended to and/or have to have the salesmen hard sell you merchandise that you make casual inquiries about (happened to me when I inquired about a pair of gloves, on a separate visit than the one I documented previously.)  The styles, quality, and pricepoints are just similar to those at J. Press, which is a much friendlier store (though not by Californian nor even NYC standards)
Oh no, what happened this time? This incident occured after the MTM one?
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Oh no, what happened this time? This incident occured after the MTM one?
No, actually, this incident happened before the other incident. I was looking at a pair of their (very nice) gloves, and inquired whether they had any cashmere lined models (hey, it gets cold here, as you know. An extra layer is often welcome.) The salesman assured me that his gloves were superior (workmanship to make an unlined glove, etc...), and sniffed whn I tried to explain why I wanted a lining. Then, after I'd moved on to look at some ties, he insisted on me trying on the gloves, and looked rather miffed when I told him that although they were, in fact, very comfortable and very nice, I was not interested in buying them. (I think that my exact words were "Thank you, very nice, but I'm really looking for something else.") I don't know. Maybe I'm just more used to streetwear boutiques, where you are pretty much left alone unless you ask for help (BTW, for really horrible customer service, the Tannery in Harvard Square is tough to beat.) Not to say that there are no models of customer service in the Boston Area. Stels and Drinkwaters, and other forum members can attest to this, have terrific proprietors/salesmen, who understand that a customer who doesn't make an immediate and large purchase is not someone to be hardsold or pushed out the door. For example, I've not bought anything at either store yet, but have referred many people to both these stores, several from this forum, and I know that they've made some sales that way. Being genuinely friendly and helpful will never lose you customers
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Being genuinely friendly and helpful will never lose you customers
Amen to that. I wish other men's stores would learn that.
post #8 of 11
I've always had terrible experiences in Louis, Bostons. I once asked a clerk if they had a high-twist suit for travel, and they told me "no". That was it, "no". No alternatives suggested, no come back in a month we'll have new stock in, just the one word. My previous experience there was equally as bad. I've stopped going, even for the sales. -boston
post #9 of 11
Quote:
I've always had terrible experiences in Louis, Bostons. I once asked a clerk if they had a high-twist suit for travel, and they told me "no".
Hmm, that's terrible. Although my experiences at Louis have been generally very positive, some of the older gentlemen seem to have similar attitudes to the salesmen/proprietors at certain other Boston area retailers. The young guys are just as knowledgeable (in addition to being terrific at putting disparate pieces together - Only at Ron Herman have I seen salesguys do as well or better) and much friendlier. If you ever want to give Louis another chance, ask to work with "Luke." AJL can tell you that he is friendly. Tell him that Fok sent you. Or PM me (though not until after Wednesday) and we'll go together.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
If you ever want to give Louis another chance, ask to work with "Luke." AJL can tell you that he is friendly.  Tell him that Fok sent you.  Or PM me (though not until after Wednesday) and we'll go together.
Indeed. In fact he emailed just this past week to inquire how I'm enjoying my recent purchases. He spent some quality time with me bringing out various pieces and putting together a few ensembles, as well as general hand-holding with obsessive/ neurotic shopper (me), and this during the fairly busy 50% off sale a couple weeks ago. Nice guy with a pretty sharp eye for details, and also not afraid to make suggestions that buck conventional fashion "wisdom" and traditions.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
I've always had terrible experiences in Louis, Bostons. I once asked a clerk if they had a high-twist suit for travel, and they told me "no". That was it, "no". No alternatives suggested, no come back in a month we'll have new stock in, just the one word. My previous experience there was equally as bad. I've stopped going, even for the sales. -boston
Trading horror stories is great fun. I'm a 36 short RTW, very tough size to find. Some salesmen can be nice about it - quite appologetic. The worst was in Brooks Brother on the 6th floor. This was at an actual Corporate Membership event where you'd think they'd try to be as nice as possible. Anyway, a salesman came up while I was looking at a suit that was hanging on the rack and asked rudely what size I was. I said "36 short." And he said, "Nope" and started to walk away. I'm thinking are you kidding me? I called after him "no, you don't have any?" "No." "Ok..." "Go to the 4th floor. They have sales racks." I'm thinking to myself, what he thinks I can't afford it up here (meanwhile, I'm wearing a suit that cost more than anything they sell.) I said, well, I'd really like this, pointing to a suit I really liked. He simply said, "No. Trust me, I work on this floor. We have nothing. Good bye." Practically kicking me off the 6th floor. It was absolutely incredible. Everyone else I've ever had experience with there has been great. Anyway, the being told that they don't have something response is, I think, a good indicator of how nice they are as salespeople. Also, as others have pointed out, the reaction to your not buying something they have helped you with is another good indicator. Acting angry or frustrated with you when you decide not to buy it is the surest way to make you never buy from them.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › J. Press trousers