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shirt sleeves - Page 2

post #16 of 27
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My question is about shirt sleeves.  The vented portion behind the cuff - my British shirts, especially T & A, have no buttons there - it just flaps open.   When ordering bespoke, what would make you order one or the other?  Why do some makers put buttons there and some don't?
I side with those that prefer to have a GB on their shirts. Just looks neater -- to my eyes anyway. The Charvet "house style", for example, does away with the GB (regardless of whether it's button-cuff or double-barrel -- read into that what you will, given the historical origins of the GB. ;-) [Why, then, Dunhill is eschewing the GB these days is beyond me.] Consequently, whenever I order MTM from Charvet, I always have to ask for the GB; they always frown at the request, and I always frown back at them. In the end, everyone is happy... JV
post #17 of 27
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(aybojs @ Jan. 26 2005,16:04) Another important factor is the ability to roll up your sleeves, which I do very often (especially when wearing French cuff shirts casually).  I typically fold the cuffs over twice and then button the gauntlet button to keep everything firm.  Without a gauntlet button, the sleeves can feel overly loose and not hang properly when rolled up.
Ditto.  The biggest downfall of the slim fitting, no-iron Brooks Brothers shirts (beside the too small by 1/4" collars) is the lack of gauntlet buttons.
The BB Luxury line shirts have gauntlet buttons, but you have to pay a handsome premium for those.
post #18 of 27
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Another important factor is the ability to roll up your sleeves, which I do very often (especially when wearing French cuff shirts casually).  I typically fold the cuffs over twice and then button the gauntlet button to keep everything firm.  Without a gauntlet button, the sleeves can feel overly loose and not hang properly when rolled up.
I agree with Aybois. It is good to keep the French cuffs firm when the sleeves are rolled up. The gauntlet Button also holds the cufflinks securely in the cuffs when the sleeves are rolled up.(as you all know I like to leave the links in when I roll my sleeves up and so the Gauntlet button is an advantage here.) Cheers stuarts8
post #19 of 27
I also prefer gauntlet buttons on FC shirts (my button-cuff shirts are mostly BB oxfords, on which I don't want them). But I'm confused about the gauntlet-buttons-for-rolling-up-sleeves argument. If I roll my sleeves up one roll--i.e. I take out the cuff links and fold back one cuff-distance--that's fine, and the gauntlet button helps hold them there. But I'd rarely roll my sleeves this way--I usually go back several more folds, to just below the elbow (or above, depending on what I'm doing). And for this, I'd have to undo the gauntlet button or it would be too tight. I don't think I have unusually muscular forearms, so are people talking about keeping the gauntlet buttons buttoned for a single-roll rollup, or, well, am I Popeye?
post #20 of 27
Jester: I think the argument is that the vent or placket on sleeves with gauntlet buttons tends to be longer, allowing you more freedom to roll up the sleeve. Most shirtmakers, if they're not using a gauntlet button, will make that vent as short as possible, since there's no button to prevent it from gaping open. The longer it is, the more it needs that button. Conversely, if it has a gauntlet button, the vent can be and often is made a little longer.
post #21 of 27
I prefer sleeves with a shorter gauntlet sans button (as they don't need it). If you're wearing the shirt with a jacket, you don't need the ability to roll up the sleeves. Also, I hate how shirts with a long gauntlet allow cold drafts to flow straight up the arm in winter.
post #22 of 27
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IBut I'm confused about the gauntlet-buttons-for-rolling-up-sleeves argument. If I roll my sleeves up one roll--i.e. I take out the cuff links and fold back one cuff-distance--that's fine, and the gauntlet button helps hold them there. But I'd rarely roll my sleeves this way--I usually go back several more folds, to just below the elbow (or above, depending on what I'm doing). And for this, I'd have to undo the gauntlet button or it would be too tight. I don't think I have unusually muscular forearms, so are people talking about  keeping the gauntlet buttons buttoned for a single-roll rollup, or, well, am I Popeye?
I keep the Gauntlet button done up for a single roll up and also for several more folds. I usually fold the sleeves back twice. I leave the cufflinks in in all cases. Much easier than taking them out and having to put them in again later when you want to roll the sleeves down again. There is some tightness when more than a single roll up but I do not find that too annoying. Once you roll the sleeve up more than twice it is not a concern at all. I encourage you Jester, to leave the links in when you roll the sleeves up. It is easier, and is a cool look. Cheers Stuarts8
post #23 of 27
The one instance in which gauntlet buttons literally pain me is with a Borrelli shirt right out of the box and after the first few washings. The buttons are so thick, they are damned near impossible to slip through the buttonhole. Someone tell me what I'm doing wrong.
post #24 of 27
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I encourage you Jester, to leave the links in when you roll the sleeves up. It is easier, and is a cool look.
Perhaps, but what will eventually happen is that I'll forget the links are still there, take off the shirt with its rolled-up cuffs, and toss it into the laundry, links and all. And then I'll have to kill myself.
post #25 of 27
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Originally Posted by stuarts8,Feb. 04 2005,10:26
I encourage you Jester, to leave the links in when you roll the sleeves up. It is easier, and is a cool look.
Perhaps, but what will eventually happen is that I'll forget the links are still there, take off the shirt with its rolled-up cuffs, and toss it into the laundry, links and all. And then I'll have to kill myself.
No, you should roll the sleeves down before you take the shirt off anyway. Cheers Stuarts8
post #26 of 27
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(jester @ Feb. 04 2005,12:27)
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Originally Posted by stuarts8,Feb. 04 2005,10:26
I encourage you Jester, to leave the links in when you roll the sleeves up. It is easier, and is a cool look.
Perhaps, but what will eventually happen is that I'll forget the links are still there, take off the shirt with its rolled-up cuffs, and toss it into the laundry, links and all. And then I'll have to kill myself.
No, you should roll the sleeves down before you take the shirt off anyway. Cheers Stuarts8
I've done this myself on more than one occassion. :-/ Fortunately, the cleaners have always caught the error, and returned the links to me. :-) JV
post #27 of 27
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The one instance in which gauntlet buttons literally pain me is with a Borrelli shirt right out of the box and after the first few washings.  The buttons are so thick, they are damned near impossible to slip through the buttonhole.  Someone tell me what I'm doing wrong.
Borrelli shirts drive me crazy when I try to get the buttons through the sleeve (and the cuff, for that matter) for the first few times. They almost make my fingers bleed. I have a Barba shirt that takes forever to get the button through. Yet another reason I prefer double-cuffs when I wear a tie.
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