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What kind of tie should my boss wear - Page 2

post #16 of 37
Perhaps you could post his e-mail address and we could deluge him with style tips from people he doesn't know Or - just sign him up for Steve B's e-mail newsletter on style... someone help me with the link please... Bradford
post #17 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Or - just sign him up for Steve B's e-mail newsletter on style... someone help me with the link please... Bradford
Only if I can be assured that no traces of my post remain.
post #18 of 37
[/quote]Too bulbous and symetrical and slope-sided.  All in all, too studied, like a dead sculpture to be gazed at rather than a living piece of cloth to be worn.  (Jeez, that sounds pretentious ...) [quote] IMO, I dont agree.  Similarly, would you say that a well crafted and perfectly fitting suit is a "dead sculpture"? I usually tie the Windsor when I need more heft in the tie, but I almost always think the end product looks better than the FIH.  The FIH usually shows a piece of sloped fabric at the top of the knot - looks sloppy to me. I may be dead wrong on this, but I think the FIHs popularity comes from the fact that it is just a simpler knot than the Windsor, and hence not everyone who wears a tie knows how to tie a Windsor.  Case in point, if you go to the Supermarket, most kids bagging groceries will be wearing the FIH, and I dont think its because they think the Windsor resembles a "dead sculpture...."
post #19 of 37
Thread Starter 
Could someone provide, easily, a visual of the differences?
post #20 of 37
Quote:
Similarly, would you say that a well crafted and perfectly fitting suit is a "dead sculpture"?
No, because well made suits are never hard as stone. The Windsor knot usually is. And even if it isn't, I just don't like the shape. A matter of taste, I suppose.
post #21 of 37
I see Manton's point; but one must remember that he is coming from a distinct stylistic position. For those who desire a sharper more tailored image, the Windsor probably is superior to the four in hand. But, one should also remember that the kids in the grocery store are tying poor four in hands, and with poor ties to boot. A good tie -- for example, a Borrelli seven-fold (four-fold) -- will tie a nice hefty four in hand, and I agree with Manton that such a knot has a type of appeal that the Windsor does not. Still, in my experience, you can train a Windsor to look almost like a four in hand with more heft. The perfectly symetrical, triangle type knot is more likely to result from a half-Windsor. My groomsmen gave me crap at my wedding for not having a perfectly symetrical upside down equilateral triangle knot -- I on the other hand thought it looked like they were wearing clip-ons.
post #22 of 37
Quote:
Could someone provide, easily, a visual of the differences?
Not great, and small, but this will give you the general idea: http://my.netian.com/~jbg71/knot.html
post #23 of 37
Quote:
Could someone provide, easily, a visual of the differences?
http://www.bensilver.com/style04/knots_home.htm
post #24 of 37
the prince albert looked very nice in the ben silver clip. I might try that. do any of you use multiple forms of tieing ties? I have done it the same way since the first time, and it strikes me as a little wierd to change.
post #25 of 37
Not trying to hijack or anything but I might be interested in the smaller ties FIHties mentionned. Would the sizing be appropriate for a slim 5'8 guy? Also who currently offers such ties on the market? Regards
post #26 of 37
I use different knots for different ties. I usually go with the Albert or the windsor.
post #27 of 37
Quote:
I use different knots for different ties.  I usually go with the Albert or the windsor.
you decide based on the fabric or just how you feel that day? it never dawned on me to try this.
post #28 of 37
Different knots for different ties. Good, thick Italian ties: four-in-hand. Thin, narrow English ties: Victoria. On the off chance that the spirit moves me: half-Windsor.
post #29 of 37
A little bit of both -- fabric/liner thickness is main thing. With some ties, two or three different knots work equally well, and I make the determination based on how I feel, the shirt I'm wearing, the suit I'm wearing, and the situation (for example, I'm more likely to tie a thick knot when wearing my chalk stripe Purple Label suit, more likely to go with a FIH or Albert when wearing an Oxxford). Double vented suit -- odds go up that I'll choose a fatter knot. Single-vented suit -- odds go up that I'll go with an FIH.
post #30 of 37
I agree with Manton on the Windsor. There's just nothing very attractive about it. The Duke of Windsor himself certainly never used it. All I really ever see Prince Charles wearing is a FIH even with his spread collars. I agree that the Victoria (as manton has corrected me, or the Prince Albert as I have previously called it) may be the way to go. You get a better shape, a thicker knot (as it's wrapped around the knot twice) and the thicker knot eats up length (one of the reasons I like it). Hermes ties do create awfully small knots with a four-in-hand, but a Victoria gives them some needed bulk. If once seeks symmetry, then I recommend the Shelby/Pratt knot over the Windsor (or half-Windsor). As far as ties themselves to, I'm not anti-Hermes as some are, but there are other (and I think) more interesting ties in the world. Some of the Carlo Franco or FIH options are (very) nice, as are more commonly seen ties like Robert Talbott or the various Italian makers.
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