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post #26356 of 28664
How does a savvy shopper buy an overcoat? My usual tailor quoted $1500+. I'm sure it would be awesome, but I'd rather pay more like $400 on the used market, hopefully for comparable fabric / construction / fit.

The problem: all of my suits and shirts are bespoke, so I don't really know my OTR size. Even if I did (or measured my tailored jackets), I dunno where to add inches when accounting for the layers of clothing underneath, or if manufacturers "include" that when sizing outerwear.

In winter, I wear trousers + odd jacket most days. When I'm in a more formal mood I break out a proper 2-piece; on a more casual workday I'll substitute a slim-fit cashmere sweater. Weekend outfits are almost identical, basically just swapping out the business-y pants for dark jeans or khakis. The fabrics vary widely, but the way I put them together sticks to a basic pattern that works for my body & sense of style. So: stick to solid grey, right?

I figure Feb is a great month for closeout deals here in NYC. Happy to shop locally if that's truly my best bet. But to be honest, I'm lazy -- please teach me how to browse overcoats on eBay / SF classifieds from my couch smile.gif. I'll be more willing to venture into the snow once I've got something warm to wear!
post #26357 of 28664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Berg View Post

How does a savvy shopper buy an overcoat? My usual tailor quoted $1500+. I'm sure it would be awesome, but I'd rather pay more like $400 on the used market, hopefully for comparable fabric / construction / fit.

The problem: all of my suits and shirts are bespoke, so I don't really know my OTR size. Even if I did (or measured my tailored jackets), I dunno where to add inches when accounting for the layers of clothing underneath, or if manufacturers "include" that when sizing outerwear.

In winter, I wear trousers + odd jacket most days. When I'm in a more formal mood I break out a proper 2-piece; on a more casual workday I'll substitute a slim-fit cashmere sweater. Weekend outfits are almost identical, basically just swapping out the business-y pants for dark jeans or khakis. The fabrics vary widely, but the way I put them together sticks to a basic pattern that works for my body & sense of style. So: stick to solid grey, right?

I figure Feb is a great month for closeout deals here in NYC. Happy to shop locally if that's truly my best bet. But to be honest, I'm lazy -- please teach me how to browse overcoats on eBay / SF classifieds from my couch smile.gif. I'll be more willing to venture into the snow once I've got something warm to wear!

 

Without knowing your size, you'll be forced to go by measurements, which is pretty hit or miss.

 

You live in NYC, one of the top cities for shopping on earth. Go try on some overcoats already!

post #26358 of 28664
Quote:
Originally Posted by confused1 View Post

Maybe I should have posted my question in this thread instead of starting my own.  Anyway...

I'm looking to buy an interviewing suit for the entry-level legal market.  I want to go dark gray / charcoal.  However, I only have $350-400 to spend.

What would be my best bet in that price range?  After reading this site, I kind of want to stay away from the Calvin Kleins of the world...

I'd agree with the JAB suggestion. It's not great, but you can regularly find solid suits in the $300-400 range. If you can't get a sig gold suit on sale for $350 in time for your interview, it's probably worthwhile dipping as "low" as their $895 Signature suits (slim fit) or their $895 Joseph suits (signature quality) -- or even the $795 Traveler. As above posters have said, definitely go with a solid charcoal (a solid navy could work as well), and make sure it fits well in your shoulders and the fabric isn't too shiny. JAB salesmen tend to be pushy and not know their stuff super well, so feel comfortable trying on the awful pinstripe Executive that they'll throw at you in your size to see if it fits and then walk out and buy a nicer charcoal on sale online. Know that with JAB you're not getting that good of a deal, and that your suit's defining characteristic will be "solid." But your chances of finding what you're looking for (a $300-400 interview suit for an entry level legal job) at JAB is probably greater than any other single place, and assuming you stick with the above advice, your chances of messing things up is close to nill.

Brooks Brothers is another solid option (but may be harder to find in your price range). I'd pretty much always prefer BB to JAB, but I think BB suits tend to go for a bit more than $300-400 even during sales (and BB runs sales pretty infrequently whereas JAB is pretty much always running sales).

If you get something besides BB or JAB, avoid going TOO fitted -- most law firms are super conservative places re fashion, and a lot of the suits they'll throw at you at stores are too fashion-forward for an entry level firm interview. My general key is this: if there's much noticeable pulling in the jacket when you button the top button with your arms at your side, it's probably too fitted for your purposes.

I'd say probably about 75% of biglaw associates have at least one JAB or BB suit. The key for a firm interview is (1) wear a conservative solid charcoal (or navy/midnight blue) suit, (2) wear something that fits you well (especially in the shoulders/sleeves), and (3) match your belt with your shoes. Lawyers in most major markets tend not to be too fashion-savvy, so if you're new to dressing up, play it safe and focus on avoiding faux pas more than on impressing anyone with your style. Oh, and get your suit pressed pre-interview.

I know i'm being repetitive and long-winded, but if I were in your shoes, I'd (1) go to several JABs to get fitted to figure out your size (it might take more than one try), (2) wait online for one of the above recommended suits to dip below $350, and (3) bring said suit to a respected tailor and spend about $50-100 getting it as close to perfect as possible. For between $300-400 (depending on how good of a deal you get), you should end up with a solid-quality JAB suit that fits you super well.
post #26359 of 28664
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post


If you remember only one thing from all that I've written, remember this: People will notice fit long before they notice whether your suit is fused or half canvassed. Whether the pick stitching on your lapel was done by machine, or by hand. Proper fit - particularly in areas which are difficult and/or expensive to alter significantly - should be your #1 priority.

Extremely good advice, for anyone buying a suit, regardless if it's hus first, or his hundredth. I also agree that there is no substitute for trying them on, physically, in a store, even if you buy in line in the end.
post #26360 of 28664

Fit check please, I am new to the style thing and have started building a wardrobe and I understand that fit is king but im a short guy sadly. Anyways I just bought my first 2  shirts from j crew one is slim S and other XS 

 

http://imgur.com/a/y0wuD

post #26361 of 28664

Due to the crappy weather in NYC, I want to go more casual tomorrow. However, my company dress code requires a tie. The best I would be able to do here is a tie with a sweater. Does anyone do this? Is it even "correct"? What kind of tie would one typically wear this way?

 

For reference, I will be wearing corduroys, button-down and a wool pull-over sweater.

post #26362 of 28664
I do it all the time, just make sure your tie isn't too dressy.

Rep stripes, and neats tend to work well with sweaters.

J
post #26363 of 28664
Do tailors generally charge again if the initial result is not to your satisfaction?
post #26364 of 28664
that would depend on the tailor. generally the ones that charge a premium will redo the work until you're 100% satisfied. If it were the tailor's mistake, he or she should really rectify the garment at his or her expense.
post #26365 of 28664
Any opinion on wearing a black belt (matte croc) with Alden color 8 shell shoes? Is Brown better?
post #26366 of 28664
Quote:
Originally Posted by MMoon24 View Post

Do tailors generally charge again if the initial result is not to your satisfaction?

As someone else said - additional work should be free if they made a mistake.

But if someone asks for an alteration but doesn't know what they're talking about, that's a different story. Like if someone asked for break with their pants without really knowing what that looks like, and then wanted no break.
post #26367 of 28664
Quote:
Originally Posted by gringodaddy View Post

Any opinion on wearing a black belt (matte croc) with Alden color 8 shell shoes? Is Brown better?

 

Yes.

 

I find pretty much any mix of browns and tans, ever burgundy, rubs along OK as it's in the same colour range.  And actually, I dislike matching belts and shoes - it's like a matching tie and PS, kind of mail-order-catalogue-trying-too-hard.  The exception being black.  Which I think must always be worn with black.

post #26368 of 28664
Hmmm, I always felt burgundy shoes only matched burgundy belts.

I'll have to look at some other combinations and see.

J
post #26369 of 28664
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

Yes.

I find pretty much any mix of browns and tans, ever burgundy, rubs along OK as it's in the same colour range.  And actually, I dislike matching belts and shoes - it's like a matching tie and PS, kind of mail-order-catalogue-trying-too-hard.  The exception being black.  Which I think must always be worn with black.

Yeah... belt/shoe should play nice with each other. They don't need to be identical twins. That looks too "mail order iGent" or some crap like that.
post #26370 of 28664
Thanks. No mixing black and brown leathers is a personal rule as well, but color 8 has (to my eye) strong black undertones. None of my current brown belts work at all. I suppose I'll look for a different brown belt.
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