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post #21316 of 28332
It is my opinion that the herringbone fabrics given as examples above wear as solids, especially numbers 2 and 3. In either business or social settings, nobody else will ever notice the herringbone, much less dock you on style points because of it.

As for navy over charcoal. Either is equally appropriate. There is a StyleForum dogma that solid navy is at the top of the heap but I don't buy it. I prefer dark gray over navy for a simple practical reason, gray doesn't show every little piece of lint which is floating around in the world and navy does.
post #21317 of 28332

Rather basic question. What, exactly, are the hallmarks that distinguish Italian style from English style? If, say, I was going for a plain navy suit, what would distinguish a Rubinacci or a Brioni from a Huntsman or Kilgour (not that I could afford those).

 

Also, what is the French style? I've never really seen French suitmakers on here.

post #21318 of 28332
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think herringbone is a fine choice. I wouldn't call it wacky or anything, but if you only have 1-3 suits not a good idea.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post

It is my opinion that the herringbone fabrics given as examples above wear as solids, especially numbers 2 and 3. In either business or social settings, nobody else will ever notice the herringbone, much less dock you on style points because of it.

As for navy over charcoal. Either is equally appropriate. There is a StyleForum dogma that solid navy is at the top of the heap but I don't buy it. I prefer dark gray over navy for a simple practical reason, gray doesn't show every little piece of lint which is floating around in the world and navy does.

Perhaps I shouldn't say they look weird, but I do not think they are tasteful as such--again, outside of big, shaggy herringbones you'd see in tweed or overcoating.

I 100% think he shouldn't buy herringbone for his first/only suit. If he's really dead set on it, go for 2 or 3 as they are pretty close to solid, but I still think solid is a much better option.
post #21319 of 28332
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post



Perhaps I shouldn't say they look weird, but I do not think they are tasteful as such--again, outside of big, shaggy herringbones you'd see in tweed or overcoating.

I 100% think he shouldn't buy herringbone for his first/only suit. If he's really dead set on it, go for 2 or 3 as they are pretty close to solid, but I still think solid is a much better option.

 

 

I already have a solid navy (well, pretty solid -- bird's-eye) suit, so this wouldn't be my first or only. I also wear suits maybe 6 times a year max, so this may not necessarily be a situation where I'm going to get the evil eye for wearing the same thing over and over again. (Maybe if I was going to only StyleForum conventions, but in the real world, it seems to me that most people -- even at white-shoe firms these days -- don't know or don't care about the differences in fabrics or suits.) I work at a big tech company where people wear pajama bottoms and clogs to work (and this is in NYC), and my friends are video-game and beer-pong types, so the bar is pretty low here.

 

Anyway, I was really looking for a solid charcoal suit that had some texture close up -- to mix it up a little -- and the herringbones seemed like the most interesting choices, especially considering I already have a bird's-eye. I was already leaning toward 2 or 3 but couldn't decide between them. 

 

On a related topic, is there any situation where a small pattern would be acceptable as your core "solid" navy or charcoal suit?

post #21320 of 28332

I'm really digging this RLBL SC...it's labelled Denim and I can pick it up for under $350...but I'm thinking I'll be stuck wearing it with jeans only...I usually do a 33 inch length but this is 31 inches....still enough to mostly cover my butt but it makes it more casual I think...not sure if this will work with Chinos?     Thanks!

 

post #21321 of 28332
It will definitely work with chinos. Go to the RL website for some ideas.
post #21322 of 28332

Awesome...thanks...and a general thank you to everyone that has helped me build my wardrobe over the past month or so...

post #21323 of 28332
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlocke View Post


I already have a solid navy (well, pretty solid -- bird's-eye) suit, so this wouldn't be my first or only. I also wear suits maybe 6 times a year max, so this may not necessarily be a situation where I'm going to get the evil eye for wearing the same thing over and over again. (Maybe if I was going to only StyleForum conventions, but in the real world, it seems to me that most people -- even at white-shoe firms these days -- don't know or don't care about the differences in fabrics or suits.) I work at a big tech company where people wear pajama bottoms and clogs to work (and this is in NYC), and my friends are video-game and beer-pong types, so the bar is pretty low here.

Anyway, I was really looking for a solid charcoal suit that had some texture close up -- to mix it up a little -- and the herringbones seemed like the most interesting choices, especially considering I already have a bird's-eye. I was already leaning toward 2 or 3 but couldn't decide between them. 

On a related topic, is there any situation where a small pattern would be acceptable as your core "solid" navy or charcoal suit?

Well, the bar is quite low, but that doesn't mean yours should be as well smile.gif

I'm with you on texture. Ideally, you'd do flannel for the winter and something like fresco or linen for the summer, but you need one suit, so I'd stick with a basic worsted. If you really want the herringbone, go for it--it's your call at the end of the day, and you need to be happy with it. I just feel herringbone isn't as much of a staple as a solid. If you have a suit that fits (which I'd assume you would given the reviews that Kent Wang gets around here) then you'll already look great and be far ahead of the curve--and now you have a suit that can be used for everything from a night on the town to an interview to a funeral--just change up the shirt, shoes, and tie.
post #21324 of 28332
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post


Well, the bar is quite low, but that doesn't mean yours should be as well smile.gif

I'm with you on texture. Ideally, you'd do flannel for the winter and something like fresco or linen for the summer, but you need one suit, so I'd stick with a basic worsted. If you really want the herringbone, go for it--it's your call at the end of the day, and you need to be happy with it. I just feel herringbone isn't as much of a staple as a solid. If you have a suit that fits (which I'd assume you would given the reviews that Kent Wang gets around here) then you'll already look great and be far ahead of the curve--and now you have a suit that can be used for everything from a night on the town to an interview to a funeral--just change up the shirt, shoes, and tie.

 

Ha, I agree, but the low bar is tempting...

 

Anyway, I've been really set on herringbone -- my original question was more about which herringbone rather than whether to go herringbone at all. I think after hearing from everyone on here, as consolation I'm going to go with no. 3, which is the smallest pattern and most likely to resemble a solid. Kent made my previous suit, which I love, so I'm pretty confident I'll love this one either way.

 

Also, this has been nagging me a bit: Won't the same people who notice that I'm wearing the same herringbone charcoal suit all the time be the ones to notice I'm wearing the same solid charcoal suit all the time? 

post #21325 of 28332
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnlocke View Post

 

Ha, I agree, but the low bar is tempting...

 

Anyway, I've been really set on herringbone -- my original question was more about which herringbone rather than whether to go herringbone at all. I think after hearing from everyone on here, as consolation I'm going to go with no. 3, which is the smallest pattern and most likely to resemble a solid. Kent made my previous suit, which I love, so I'm pretty confident I'll love this one either way.

 

Also, this has been nagging me a bit: Won't the same people who notice that I'm wearing the same herringbone charcoal suit all the time be the ones to notice I'm wearing the same solid charcoal suit all the time? 

Just be careful your herringbone doesn't end up looking like a self-stripe. I have one of these and don't wear it because of this.

 

Also, since you already have a bird's eye, I am going to go with the consensus that a solid is the best option. I like charcoal over navy (barely) because you can wear navy ties with it.

post #21326 of 28332
Quote:
Originally Posted by msulinski View Post

Just be careful your herringbone doesn't end up looking like a self-stripe. I have one of these and don't wear it because of this.

 

Also, since you already have a bird's eye, I am going to go with the consensus that a solid is the best option. I like charcoal over navy (barely) because you can wear navy ties with it.

Well, that was sort of my original question -- how do I tell if something will look like a self-stripe from just a swatch?

 

I'm leaning toward this: http://www.kentwang.com/suits/charcoal-herringbone.html or this: http://www.kentwang.com/suits/charcoal-herringbone-3.html.

 

For reference, Kent Wang's standard charcoal suit is made from this: http://www.kentwang.com/suits/charcoal-twill-3.html.

post #21327 of 28332

What is the consensus on "the gap" that is formed when buttoning a jacket that leaves the belt buckle and part of the shirt visible? I'm not sure if there's more accurate terminology I should be using here. To explain what I mean, I snagged a picture from the WAYWRN thread of our esteemed friend NewYorkIslander. It's not my intention to pick on NYI, but his picture demonstrated exactly what I'm curious about. 

 

 

When is it appropriate and when is it not appropriate? It seems to be more of a casual/odd SC thing, whereas a well-made suit would not display any gap? Am I right in guessing that "the gap" is just a little more casual vs a jacket that completely overlaps and does not show the gap?

post #21328 of 28332

I would say that the quarters are too open (that's the expression) in this pic of NYI.  In my opinion this is a little too nipped in the waist (the stretching/creases around the button are a giveaway, but this is very common with the fashion for a close fit these days), the quarters are just cut too open, and the trousers could have a slightly higher rise (again, the current fad is low rise; I dislike it).

 

Generally, if you can see your belt buckle, and certainly if you can see your shirt below the suit button, then that's a bad thing.  One of three things could be wrong: the buttoning point of the jacket is too high, the quarters are too open, or the trousers sit too low.  In this case I'd say the second, possibly with a hint of the third, AND that the jacket is just a touch too small around the body.  He's a splendid dresser for a schoolteacher though, isn't he?  Actually, he's a splendid dresser by any standard.

post #21329 of 28332
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

I would say that the quarters are too open (that's the expression) in this pic of NYI.  In my opinion this is a little too nipped in the waist (the stretching/creases around the button are a giveaway, but this is very common with the fashion for a close fit these days), the quarters are just cut too open, and the trousers could have a slightly higher rise (again, the current fad is low rise; I dislike it).

 

Generally, if you can see your belt buckle, and certainly if you can see your shirt below the suit button, then that's a bad thing.  One of three things could be wrong: the buttoning point of the jacket is too high, the quarters are too open, or the trousers sit too low.  In this case I'd say the second, possibly with a hint of the third, AND that the jacket is just a touch too small around the body.  He's a splendid dresser for a schoolteacher though, isn't he?  Actually, he's a splendid dresser by any standard.


Call me crazy but I actually dig it...the hint of metal juxtaposed with the tie is cool...I agree with the other poster that it's more casual than a suit...it lends it a certain something...or as the French say a certain je m'appelle insouciance. ;)

post #21330 of 28332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irish View Post

Understood.  Mine was an accident -- I thought I was in the other forum.  I'm an old man, I'm confused!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79YUknp1T7I

No worries, Irish. In hope that you find some folks over there who can help you out.
Cheers.
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