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post #21226 of 27513
Has anyone tried changing the color of shoes with colored shoe polish? I found this polish on amazon in tons of colors:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Woly-Black-Shoe-Cream/dp/B0055CPRK6

I thought it may be interesting, I have some light-brown boots that look a bit dull to me, I wouldn't mind adding some color to them. I would love to see pictures if anyones done this before.
post #21227 of 27513
Quote:
Originally Posted by max_r View Post

Has anyone tried changing the color of shoes with colored shoe polish? I found this polish on amazon in tons of colors:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Woly-Black-Shoe-Cream/dp/B0055CPRK6

I thought it may be interesting, I have some light-brown boots that look a bit dull to me, I wouldn't mind adding some color to them. I would love to see pictures if anyones done this before.
official shoe care thread
post #21228 of 27513
good call i forgot about that thread
post #21229 of 27513

Hi guys,

 

I really hope you don't mind me jumping into the conversation here (I know this is a men's domain!). My husband has spent most of his real estate career in fairly ordinary suits, no idea what brand, but off the rack/no tailoring etc. He has recently lost a lot of weight which means it's time for a new suit, and I can't bear the thought of another ill-made suit.

 

I have been combing through this forum and searching for lots of different brands as as result, but I'm thoroughly confused - hence posting in here. 


I am hoping to get some advice on a classic black suit, roughly $400-$700 range, and one that has a little bit of cred to it. I literally have no idea when it comes to men's fashion!! Any help would be GREATLY appreciated. He is 6.2, 90kg with fairly big shoulders if that makes any difference...

 

Thank you :)

post #21230 of 27513
Mimo, I feel its worth mentioning that your first recommendation was made of polished/corrected leather, which I was told to avoid. Can you comment on the quality of Samuel Windsor shoes? Those prices are amazing and I'm eyeing their brown leather chukkas
post #21231 of 27513
Hey folks!

Newbie here, can I get a quick critique on the fit of this blazer? Thanks!

http://www.styleforum.net/t/345185/newbie-here-would-like-fit-critique#post_6296414
post #21232 of 27513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wifey View Post


I am hoping to get some advice on a classic black suit, roughly $400-$700 range, and one that has a little bit of cred to it. I literally have no idea when it comes to men's fashion!! Any help would be GREATLY appreciated. He is 6.2, 90kg with fairly big shoulders if that makes any difference...

Thank you smile.gif

Get a navy blue or dark gray suit, not black.
post #21233 of 27513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wifey View Post

I am hoping to get some advice on a classic black suit
First, please please please reconsider on the matter of the suit's color. Despite what some - particularly, albeit not exclusively, those with relatively little understanding of classic men's fashion -- believe, a black suit is not "classic." In almost every possible situation where you might think a black suit would be the best choice, a grey or navy suit would be preferable. Well, with the possible exception of clubbing, but I don't go clubbing, so I can't really speak to what's preferable on that front. (And yes, even when attending a funeral, a charcoal grey suit is often a better choice than a black one, although I'll allow as how a funeral is one of those rare occasions when wearing a black suit may actually be a perfectly valid choice.)

This point has, however, been discussed at SF at great length on many occasions, so rather than rehashing what's already been said, I'd advise you to look up old threads, should you be so inclined.
Quote:
roughly $400-$700 range
In that price range, bespoke is out of the question, of course. Made-to-measure (MTM) may be a possibility, barely, but unless your husband is unusually difficult to fit (and 6'2", 200 lbs, with broad shoulders, doesn't sound all that difficult, although one never can tell for sure without seeing the person) he will likely get a better quality suit by buying off-the-rack (OTR), and then getting it expertly tailored for perfect fit.

Don't get me wrong - I'm not knocking MTM suits. If you said your price range were $900-1200, I might well recommend MTM. But at $400-700, with no obvious physical oddities making OTR suits a fundamentally poor fit, buying OTR and getting it "fine tuned" afterward, is probably the way to go.
Quote:
and one that has a little bit of cred to it.
No idea what this means. Are you saying you want the suit to have a label whose name people will recognize? That you want some particular feature which people sometimes associate with high quality suits? That you want it to reflect some particular school of fashion though? Or what?
Quote:
I literally have no idea when it comes to men's fashion!!
That's okay. Most women are clueless about what suits men should wear - which seldom prevents them from telling their husbands/boyfriends/sons what to wear. You, at least, understand that you lack the necessary understanding, and are seeking to be educated.

Oh, lest you think that remark is sexist, let me note that neither do most men know what suits they should be wearing. smile.gif
Quote:
Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.
Okay, first off, you need to devote some time to reading about suits - style, fit, material, etc. Decide what sort of suit would work best for your husband, based on his looks, where he'll likely be wearing the suit, his preferences as to fit, etc. (For example, maybe he prefers a traditional fit, as opposed to a closer fitting suit. Nothing inherently wrong with that, but it's something you and your husband will have to decide. Don't let strangers on an online forum decide this for you.)

Then, once you have some idea what you want, go start a new thread (as this will all be far too involved for incorporation into this "Ask A Question, Get An Answer" thread, which tends to deal best with relatively simple and straight forward matters), asking for suggestions as to where you can find something like it, given your price range.

Then, you and your husband go there (and I'm hoping it's a physical store, and not just a website, since someone relatively unfamiliar with quality suits is almost always better off going to an actual store, where he can be measured, and try various things on, than he is ordering off the web - although much depends on where you're located... what holds true for someone shopping for suits in Manhattan, may not hold true for someone shopping for suits in rural Montana). Have your husband try on some suits. Then, when he finds one which both of you like and think is a good choice, whip out your cell phone and take a few pictures of him wearing it. One from the front (with him standing naturally). One from behind. One from the side.

Post these pictures to the thread you started. Ask for opinions.

Ask if anyone can recommend a good alterations tailor near you. Because even a suit that looks good and fits pretty well right off the rack can often benefit from just a little expert tailoring. A half inch here or there can genuinely make a difference. (Plus, you'll need to have the pants cuffed - or hemmed, if that's what you prefer. And very possibly the sleeves will need to be shortened slightly. These two alterations are almost a given, they're so common.)

Finally, if you aren't already up on it, educate yourself on how to care for the suit. Maybe you'll want to buy a brush for it. Maybe you'll recognize that instead of sending your husband's suits to the cleaners for a cleaning-and-pressing every so often, all you really ought to be doing is having them pressed, with cleaning a far less common thing. Maybe you'll realize that your local dry cleaner simply does a horrible job on suits - pressing them badly is a common thing - and you ought to find a new, better cleaners.

You could even make sure you (or, really, your husband) understands how to wear the suit to its best advantage. For example, many men wear their suit pants far too low. Others don't know which buttons to button, when they button their suit coats. And some are confused regarding which shirts to wear with their suits, or which shoes to wear with them.

Well, this post is already on the long side, and I've barely touched up some key issues and advice. Like I said, you really need to start a brand new thread for this topic. But good luck. And congratulations to your husband on losing the weight (assuming it was intentional).
post #21234 of 27513

Wow, thank you so much for that response, I appreciate you going into so much detail. 

 

I'm pretty sure he can do a dark grey suit (definitely not navy blue, even though I know he'd love a suit in that colour) so I'll scrap the black idea. I will also have a good read of the threads re: navy blue/dark gray suits. That's really interesting and good to know. 

 

Michael - your reply definitely didn't come across as sexist; I've really never taken any interest in men's fashion, even though I love women's fashion. I just hope I don't come across like he's "under the thumb" and I tell him what to wear. I just thought I'd do a bit of research for him :)

 

Unfortunately (or fortunately, I do love our country, but our fashion options are just more limited that the US/Europe) we live in Australia, so I will have to do some scouting to find stores which stock decent suits. I have a great tailor (after a little trial and error), so that's crossed off the "to-do list". Our local dry cleaner does do a terrible job on his current suit, so I will keep those tips that in mind too.

 

Oh, when I said "a bit of cred" I suppose I just meant something that will look nice and stylish - not a particular brand or anything. A bit of a nothing comment really as I suppose it goes without saying!

 

Thanks again for your help; when we find some options I will be back with a new thread and photos. And yes, very much intentional with the weight loss - he's done a great job :)

post #21235 of 27513

A good fit will take you a long way, and it sounds like an off-the-rack suit with a little tailoring will work. But it also helps to buy a well constructed suit. Style Forum has a thread devoted to rating the quality of different suit makers; at the <$700 level, the subportion below is probably most relevant. The terms "half canvassed" and "fused" refer a detail of the suit construction technique; "half canvassed" is considered more desirable than "fused". The list below includes makers with traditional styling (eg Brooks Brothers, Hickey Freeman) and more modern cuts (eg Boglioli, Lardini, Cantarelli). That is really a matter of taste (yours).

 

Satisfactory [**] (IE: The "average" brands. Quality is acceptable.)

- Belvest Silver Label (half canvassed line)
- Brooks Brothers 1818 (half canvassed)
- Cantarelli
- Charles Tyrwhitt
- Etro (if you can find the half canvas ones)
Boglioli (if you can find the half canvas ones)
- Giorgio Armani (Black Label) (alot of their pieces are fused)
- H. Freemann
- Hackett
- Hugo Boss Selection half canvassed and some premium fabrics
- Hickey Freeman LTD (half canvassed)
- Lardini and related brands (Ferragamo suiting)
- Marks and Spencer (any of their "Pure Wool" collection)
- Paul Smith London (half canvassed)
- Racing Green
- Suitsupply
- Z-Zegna
- Valentino (half canvassed)

Mediocre to Poor[*] (Suits that are mediocre to poor.)

- J. Press mainline (fused)
- Hugo Boss (fused)
Hickey (fused, now made in China, not US)
- Joseph Abboud

post #21236 of 27513
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerangedGoose View Post

Mimo, I feel its worth mentioning that your first recommendation was made of polished/corrected leather, which I was told to avoid. Can you comment on the quality of Samuel Windsor shoes? Those prices are amazing and I'm eyeing their brown leather chukkas

 

Like I said. you get what you pay for.  The lowest price shoes I've seen with really nice leather are those Barkers.  But Barker do "polished" leather too, so it varied from model to model.  The Samuel Windsor shoes will no doubt be polished/corrected grain: the only ones I've ever bought are some suede ones for my 14 year old son.

 

But don't get too hung up on "corrected grain".  We all live in the real world, and even with a cheaper leather, a bit of work with the polish can make them look more respectable.  If anything, some of these cheap polished leathers take a shine more easily.  The real downsides with such leather are that it doesn't breath as well or take the polish/renovator in as easily, and is more vulnerable to cracking over time as a result.  But if you want a cheap pair for the short term, especially if you're a student or whatever, don't worry about it too much.  Get something that you really like the look of, that fits well.  That's the best place to start with anything.

 

 

Semi-Fly: I am not familiar enough with different American brands to think of any quality products in that price range - unless perhaps you can find some Allen Edmonds you like on sale somewhere.  I'd say don't be too worried about the shipping and stuff.  Meermin can be really slow and unpredictable, so maybe skip them, but Bexley are pretty efficient and you can calculate the postage before you pay.  Pediwear have excellent customer service and will give you advice on fit if you ask, and their postage charges are fixed.  I've dealt with them happily for shipping to the Middle East.

 

I wear a UK 9.5 F or G, and a US 10E in Allen Edmonds, possibly 10.5D depending on the shoe.  I also find a 10.5 tight in some other brands.  Allen Edmonds have a printable size guide, so try using that to get your "official" size from them, and I'll maybe be able to suggest how some of the shoes I listed compare.

 

Regarding the last shapes of the two Barkers, actually in real life it's the other way around.  The soft square toe is a little extended in a way that doesn't show in the picture.  It's the lovely tan ones that have a shorter, rounder, more conservative last.  If your 10.5 shoes are the right length but a bit narrow, then these tan Barkers or the Loake cap toes will probably be great in a UK 9.5 - they're both a slightly wider fitting and a comfortable shape.

post #21237 of 27513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wifey View Post

Thanks again for your help; when we find some options I will be back with a new thread and photos. 

 

If I might jump in, you have some great advice above: long distance made to order is a real pain in my experience until you've tried and failed a few times to find your best fit and maker.  In your case, it just isn't worth it.

 

Navy, charcoal, mid-grey.  Solid colour is most versatile, but a pin or chalk stripe is really sharp for business too - it will also accentuate his height and slimness!  But as wise heads above have said, forget the brand.  Stick to pure wool for a do-anything suit, and make that your only criterion to start with.  Don't be afraid of the high street shops because the only thing that really makes a suit look stylish is that it fits.  I would guess a 42 long in a slim fit from the likes of Marks and Spencer might be extremely flattering and well within your budget.  It doesn't sound glamorous, but it doesn't have to: if it's nice cloth and fits well, it will look it.

 

So, take him to the shops.  Get a plan in your mind of four or five places that sell men's suits (he can't go to more than five, that would be cruel, and two or three is probably enough), check them out yourself first to see if they do his approximate size and styles you like, and make a logical plan.  This sounds silly perhaps, but men like to shop logically, i.e. knowing they're going to the shop that sells the thing they came for, and if there's more than one option, visiting shops in a logical order of location.  Do not mix it with any other errands.  Men like a clear mission: "babe, we're going to get you a suit tomorrow. We're starting at shop X, because they have a sale on and it's a cool brand, then working south along the high street via shop Y because they have a good selection, and then to shop Z at the bottom because I liked their fabric best.  Then we'll stop for a pint and decide which one to go back and buy".  He can live with that, I promise you.

 

Also, there's no point taking him shopping in flip flops and a t-shirt.  He needs to wear a proper shirt with a collar, and proper shoes - loafers maybe as a compromise, as they're easy to take on and off for trying things.  This way he can see how a suit will actually fit and look when it's on.  It's surprising how many people forget this, and shuffle around in a t-shirt and trainers trying to work out if the trousers are too long or the collar is right.

 

My simple suggestion:

 

- Buy a plain single-breasted navy suit with medium notch lapels (not Justin Bieber skinny), and a double vent (versatile, comfortable and never unfashionable).

-  Try two or three buttons.  As he's slim and tall, he might be able to carry off the latter, but the former feels less constraining.  Whatever looks and feels best

- 100% wool.  Really.  It should drape smoothly, and perhaps have a slight sheen in the light, but NOT shiny!

- Don't get trousers with a very low rise.  It's fashionable now, but in a few years will look ridiculous, and there's no reason he shouldn't still have this suit.  The belt buckle should not show below the opening of the bottom button (which should always be left undone, just as the uppper/middle button should always be fastened when standing).  If it does, the trousers need to come up higher.

- As he's slim, a flat front on the trousers is something he can do.  But a single pleat is comfortable and classic.

- If there's nothing that fits perfectly, it's not the end of the world, but bear this in mind: make sure the shoulders and the collar are perfect.  If tailors are an unknown quantity, this is not an area you want to adjust.  Taking in the waist or shortening the trousers is as far as you should need to go, but I suspect you'll find a pretty good fit off the peg.

- If he doesn't love how he looks in it, don't buy it.  It can wait.

 

 

And one more thing: shirts, shoes, socks.  Think about it.

 

Good luck!

post #21238 of 27513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wifey View Post

Hi guys,

 

I really hope you don't mind me jumping into the conversation here (I know this is a men's domain!). My husband has spent most of his real estate career in fairly ordinary suits, no idea what brand, but off the rack/no tailoring etc. He has recently lost a lot of weight which means it's time for a new suit, and I can't bear the thought of another ill-made suit.

 

I have been combing through this forum and searching for lots of different brands as as result, but I'm thoroughly confused - hence posting in here. 


I am hoping to get some advice on a classic black suit, roughly $400-$700 range, and one that has a little bit of cred to it. I literally have no idea when it comes to men's fashion!! Any help would be GREATLY appreciated. He is 6.2, 90kg with fairly big shoulders if that makes any difference...

 

Thank you :)

Dear Wifey,

 

I am not going to go out there and recommend other brands, simply because all my suits have been off the rack.  My father is a bespoke tailor.  I can point you towards my blog, which suggests what you should look out for when getting a bespoke suit, and in some cases, a suit off the rack.  Just to outline, some of the things you should look out for are:

 

1.  Fit.  It all starts with the shoulders.  If the fit around the shoulders is snug, that provides a good starting point for the rest of the suit to follow.  Also, if he has lost weight and is looking more athletic, the suit should have a drop, which is usually 4-6 inches for more athletic men.  This refers to the 'drop' in measurements between the chest and the waist.  Additionally, you should look for a jacket sleeve length that is approximately 1/4 inch shorter than the shirt sleeve length that your husband typically wears, as this allows some cuff to be shown, which is considered elegant and almost protocol for a well dressed man.  Trouser length should break around the heels of your shoes (slightly above). 

 

2.  Fabric.  High quality suits are generally made of wool.  Quality of wool is typically designated by its 'Super' Number.  Super Numbers can range from 80 to approximately 140, with the higher the Super Number, the finer the quality of the fabric.  This is because a higher 'Super' number indicates that the fabrics yarns have been twisted more, which results in greater durability and a finer fabric. 

 

3.  Attention to detail - this will generally come with a bespoke suit, but there are things to look out for with off the rack purchases as well, such as color of your lining, vents in the jacket (to allow for greater freedom of movement), workable buttons, etc. 

 

Please find more details regarding bespoke tailoring and men's formalwear fashion in general at my blog:  http://suitupdressup.wordpress.com/category/bespoke-tailoring/

There is actually an article in here specifically dedicated to women looking to dress their man in a bespoke suit!

Hope this helps.  Please feel free to message me with any questions that you may have, and best of luck with the whole process:)

 

Regards,

 

 

RCAsia

post #21239 of 27513
Obvious noob question. But I've been seeing people discussing open and closed quarters....what exactly does that mean?
Thanks
post #21240 of 27513
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCAsia View Post

This is because a higher 'Super' number indicates that the fabrics yarns have been twisted more, which results in greater durability and a finer fabric. 

In general, higher super numbers are less durable than lower super numbers.
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