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post #18751 of 29422

How do Isaia shirts fit? The best fitting shirt I've worn was a Massimo Dutti one, so if anyone knows how Isaia compares (fit wise, I know the quality is miles apart), please help!

post #18752 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smudge View Post

As a rule of thumb, pick stitching on a suit is a sign of quality right?
Edit - suit I am thinking of is a Lubiam 1911

There are a lot of cheaper suits with machine pick stitching now. JAB has some truly awful pick sticking on some of their lines.
post #18753 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smudge View Post

As a rule of thumb, pick stitching on a suit is a sign of quality right?
Edit - suit I am thinking of is a Lubiam 1911

Nope. Pick stitching has shown up in all sorts of garbage suits. It's like working buttonholes. At one point, it may have only been seen on nicer suits... But then people latched onto it as a false indicator of quality--"oooh, only nice suits have working buttonholes/pick stitching!"--at which point every manufacturer started adding them. Means absolutely nothing now.
post #18754 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand View Post

I was just about the ask the same question about Philly.

http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/top-lists/best-thift-stores-flea-markets-in-philadelphia/

The Salvation Army Store on Broad Street is your best bet for adult men's clothing. I've been there before and they have a nice selection of suits, sportcoats, ties, and belts.
post #18755 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCAsia View Post

I think the skinny tie trend has come along with a fairly large percentage of woolen ties, which is why we feel woolen ties should be skinnier.  The trend has been skinny woolen ties with checked shirts etc....

I have one my Dad gave me, made in the mid 70s. Pretty much the exact same width as the modern wool ties you think of as skinny, and tie width trends in the 70s were towards the ridiculously wide end of the spectrum. Seriously, people thought this looked good.

That's just the way traditional wool ties are made.
post #18756 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post

Nope. Pick stitching has shown up in all sorts of garbage suits. It's like working buttonholes. At one point, it may have only been seen on nicer suits... But then people latched onto it as a false indicator of quality--"oooh, only nice suits have working buttonholes/pick stitching!"--at which point every manufacturer started adding them. Means absolutely nothing now.

Absolutely! Although I'll take the working cuff buttons as a plus. Not that they serve any real purpose. But I have always hated the 'falseness' of cuff buttons sewn over non working buttonhole stitching. Even before I knew anything about the difference. It just looks 'fake' to me.
post #18757 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

Absolutely! Although I'll take the working cuff buttons as a plus. Not that they serve any real purpose. But I have always hated the 'falseness' of cuff buttons sewn over non working buttonhole stitching. Even before I knew anything about the difference. It just looks 'fake' to me.

I definitely prefer working buttonholes... But I do not like my coats to come with them on them. Makes it very hard (read: expensive) to alter sleeve length, which I almost always need to do.

Much prefer coats to come basted for working buttonholes and include the sleeve buttons in a bag with the coat--then can either just have them sewn right on, or have working holes cut.
post #18758 of 29422

first suit, blue or grey? for medical residency interviews and other life events (weddings... etc.)

 

http://www.ehaberdasher.com/servlet/the-15421/Benjamin-Sartorial-Suit-cln--39R-fdsh-40R/Detail

 

http://www.ehaberdasher.com/servlet/Detail?no=15433

 

I am 6 feet tall, 170, dark complexion (Mediterranean) 

post #18759 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docb16 View Post

first suit, blue or grey? for medical residency interviews and other life events (weddings... etc.)

http://www.ehaberdasher.com/servlet/the-15421/Benjamin-Sartorial-Suit-cln--39R-fdsh-40R/Detail

http://www.ehaberdasher.com/servlet/Detail?no=15433

I am 6 feet tall, 170, dark complexion (Mediterranean) 

Yes.

Actually, navy. Weddings, interviews and whatnot, that lighter gray would be fine. But if you ever find yourself at a somber occasion like a funeral, something dark like a navy or charcoal would be called for. You can never go wrong with a navy or charcoal suit, while a mid gray like that is in the "you can rarely go wrong" category.

Nice choice of suit, by the way.
Edited by cptjeff - 11/29/12 at 10:27am
post #18760 of 29422

Was wondering if anyone is familiar with this website. Quality?

 

www.garytailor.com

 

Thank you!

post #18761 of 29422
Is it not possible for a tailor to lengthen dress shirt sleeves? I always thought it could be done as there would be extra fabric under the cuff.
post #18762 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarksdb View Post

Is it not possible for a tailor to lengthen dress shirt sleeves? I always thought it could be done as there would be extra fabric under the cuff.
I didn't think there was.
post #18763 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarksdb View Post

Is it not possible for a tailor to lengthen dress shirt sleeves? I always thought it could be done as there would be extra fabric under the cuff.

Not enough to do much of anything with. Buy a longer sleeve length and have it shortened if it's a problem, but just buying the longer length should suffice.
post #18764 of 29422

I'm thinking about starting to do some thrifting for dress shoes. When you find older dress shoes which may not have been cleaned for a while, is it pretty simple to "bring them back to life" per say? Will applying some cream and/or polish be enough? Or should I expect that some shoes I find when thrifting are "unsalvageable"?

post #18765 of 29422
Quote:
Originally Posted by amathew View Post

I'm thinking about starting to do some thrifting for dress shoes. When you find older dress shoes which may not have been cleaned for a while, is it pretty simple to "bring them back to life" per say? Will applying some cream and/or polish be enough? Or should I expect that some shoes I find when thrifting are "unsalvageable"?

I am about to give you solid advice. Don't buy used shoes unless it is from a reputable member on here. Way back when when I tried doing this every shoes I got either went in the garbage, or back to the seller. I have a friend who pretty much wears nothing but used shoes and he has spent a small fortune trying to find decent ones and cobbling old POS shoes. You will spend just as much, or more money and tons more of your time trying to do this. Trust me.
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