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post #17101 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by aw82 View Post

My question is about a trouser wardrobe for a business casual or slightly dressier environment, where suits are only worn once a week or every other week. All the lists of essentials specify a pair of mid-grey wool, crisp khakis, and dark denim. Some also include chinos. Leaving out chinos, three pairs of pants doesn't seem adequate.
So the question is, do you have two pairs of each or do you supplement with other colors?

 

If you need more variety, or simply need more than three pairs of trousers to wear during the week, you can go with different textures of material or different patterns. Other colors are fine too, although if it is a conservative environment I would ensure that you don't go too wild. Think like olive wool trousers, brown chinos, even a pair of slim fitting pinstripe trousers. Be careful with that last one though as it can tend to look like you are wearing suit trousers that you lost the jacket for.

 

So I picked up a pair of light grey wool trousers.  A bit lighter than I wanted but all I could find in my size at Nordstrom Rack (JB Britches flat fronts, $80).  Interested in thoughts on the brand before I have them tailored.

 

I have another question about trousers...when people say khakis are essential, does this typically mean khaki colored wool or khaki chinos?

post #17102 of 28509
Looking for a versatile casual driver (prefer suede) to wear with shorts and chinos (or other cotton trousers), any suggestions on specific shoes, brands, or sites to look on? Does a suede make it more casual? Hoping for something in the $100-$150 price point, but willing to spend more if I really need to.

Similar to these:

Polo Ralph Lauren 'Telly' Driving Loafer
Prada Suede Driving Shoe

Cole Haan 'Air Grant' Driving Loafer
post #17103 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

http://www.hangerproject.com/closet/wurkin-stiffs-complete-set.html
Should I pick these "Wurkin Stiffs" collar stays for the perfect roll or do MC'ers have a better suggestion? Price is not really an issue but I do not need something like sterling silver etc. Just something that will work and give the ideal collar roll.

bump
post #17104 of 28509

What's so special about the USPS facility in Chicago? All my packages ends up at the Chicago, IL 60666 facility, and I hear nothing from the tracking number after it has arrived the facility. Does it mean that it is on the way to international destinations?

post #17105 of 28509

Hey folks

 

I've been hunting watches for a while, but being a student and with the exchange rate as it is at the moment, my budget is seriously limited.

 

Was initially looking at the Skagen super slim, as I am really not fond of bulky watches although I do have decently sized wrists.

 

 

After loads of searching this forum and others, it seems that these are really not very durable. I really love the design, suits my style and my personality.

 

So after some deliberation I have been looking at the Seiko automatics. Far from the lovely slim Skagen, but perhaps a worthy contender? I hunted around on Amazon and found this baby on special.

 

 

 

Still a pretty fine looking time piece (bar the date, which seems hamfisted), but looking at the strap, I am guessing that I'd not be able to swap around much, if at all? Hopefully I am wrong.

 

Perhaps not a direct question, but can anyone share any opinions, knowledge or recommendations here? Once again, my budget is tight, and I'd max out at $100.

 

Thanks for your time :)

post #17106 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by aw82 View Post


I have another question about trousers...when people say khakis are essential, does this typically mean khaki colored wool or khaki chinos?

"Khakis" as a term is equivalent to chinos. In terms of english language use, the color name actually follows the article of clothing (actually the cloth), not the other way around. The cloth was tightly woven cotton twill that the British adopted in india- more durable and cooler than the wool they had been wearing. It was typically dyed in tea or mulberry juice, and takes its name from a Persian word for dirt, describing the color.

So yes, this refers to the pants. And the various forms of tan are the most classic, I prefer sand (a much lighter tan) myself, but it's not a contradiction in terms to wear olive khakis, or gray ones. Or navy ones. Black khakis aren't a contradiction in terms, but they are an affront to god.

As for those lists, they're basically to cover what most people in a professional career will need to cover the full range of outfits they might wear in that lifestyle. Edit as you see fit. Khakis are a more casual option, but are perfectly appropriate with a sportcoat in most formal workplaces (though there are still some highly formal environments where they aren't), are usually the default pant option in less formal workplaces, and the standard formal pant option in a casual one (where jeans would dominate). They can also range fairly far into the casual spectrum, making them very versatile. And the fact that they're machine washable makes them easy to take care of, so you can get them dirty and beat them up without too much worry, making them an attractive alternative to wool on a worksite or on a rainy day when you might get various gunk splashed up on your pants.
post #17107 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post


"Khakis" as a term is equivalent to chinos. In terms of english language use, the color name actually follows the article of clothing (actually the cloth), not the other way around. The cloth was tightly woven cotton twill that the British adopted in india- more durable and cooler than the wool they had been wearing. It was typically dyed in tea or mulberry juice, and takes its name from a Persian word for dirt, describing the color.
So yes, this refers to the pants. And the various forms of tan are the most classic, I prefer sand (a much lighter tan) myself, but it's not a contradiction in terms to wear olive khakis, or gray ones. Or navy ones. Black khakis aren't a contradiction in terms, but they are an affront to god.
As for those lists, they're basically to cover what most people in a professional career will need to cover the full range of outfits they might wear in that lifestyle. Edit as you see fit. Khakis are a more casual option, but are perfectly appropriate with a sportcoat in most formal workplaces (though there are still some highly formal environments where they aren't), are usually the default pant option in less formal workplaces, and the standard formal pant option in a casual one (where jeans would dominate). They can also range fairly far into the casual spectrum, making them very versatile. And the fact that they're machine washable makes them easy to take care of, so you can get them dirty and beat them up without too much worry, making them an attractive alternative to wool on a worksite or on a rainy day when you might get various gunk splashed up on your pants.

Thanks for the excellent information! This is how I understand the term khaki, but I wanted to make sure.

 

I have been in a no-tie-or-jacket (though I can wear both generally without too much ridicule) environment for five years and have typically worn slacks (unfortunately mostly polyester blends) most often.  I'm trying to update my wardrobe and am running into a bit of a roadblock in terms of what pants to wear.  I like khakis/chinos, but I struggle with shoe pairings.  Still, I really prefer to wear slacks (wool this time around) but don't want to necessarily wear grey every day.

 

Thanks again for the input!

post #17108 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by aw82 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post


"Khakis" as a term is equivalent to chinos. In terms of english language use, the color name actually follows the article of clothing (actually the cloth), not the other way around. The cloth was tightly woven cotton twill that the British adopted in india- more durable and cooler than the wool they had been wearing. It was typically dyed in tea or mulberry juice, and takes its name from a Persian word for dirt, describing the color.
So yes, this refers to the pants. And the various forms of tan are the most classic, I prefer sand (a much lighter tan) myself, but it's not a contradiction in terms to wear olive khakis, or gray ones. Or navy ones. Black khakis aren't a contradiction in terms, but they are an affront to god.
As for those lists, they're basically to cover what most people in a professional career will need to cover the full range of outfits they might wear in that lifestyle. Edit as you see fit. Khakis are a more casual option, but are perfectly appropriate with a sportcoat in most formal workplaces (though there are still some highly formal environments where they aren't), are usually the default pant option in less formal workplaces, and the standard formal pant option in a casual one (where jeans would dominate). They can also range fairly far into the casual spectrum, making them very versatile. And the fact that they're machine washable makes them easy to take care of, so you can get them dirty and beat them up without too much worry, making them an attractive alternative to wool on a worksite or on a rainy day when you might get various gunk splashed up on your pants.

Thanks for the excellent information! This is how I understand the term khaki, but I wanted to make sure.

 

I have been in a no-tie-or-jacket (though I can wear both generally without too much ridicule) environment for five years and have typically worn slacks (unfortunately mostly polyester blends) most often.  I'm trying to update my wardrobe and am running into a bit of a roadblock in terms of what pants to wear.  I like khakis/chinos, but I struggle with shoe pairings.  Still, I really prefer to wear slacks (wool this time around) but don't want to necessarily wear grey every day.

 

Thanks again for the input!


Navy gab with brown is another good option

post #17109 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingusberry View Post

What's so special about the USPS facility in Chicago? All my packages ends up at the Chicago, IL 60666 facility, and I hear nothing from the tracking number after it has arrived the facility. Does it mean that it is on the way to international destinations?

It's been that way since Capone.
Seriously, USPS tracking mystifies me although I am on the East Coast and none of my stuff seems to stop in Chicago. I have run tracking and my parcel has been mysteriously sitting in some post office for days. Frustrated, I run it 15 minutes later and it says it has been delivered to my door. I check and Voila! it's there. Bizarre.
post #17110 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post

"Khakis" as a term is equivalent to chinos. .
Originally, khaki was a color and chino was a type of twill fabric. Now they are pretty much interchangeable in the US whether the fabric is twill or not. The fabric is cotton and not wool though.
post #17111 of 28509

Does it make a difference buying a regular fit or slim fit suit if youre gonna get it tailored in the waist anyways? Is there some other parts of the suit that tend to be more slim on the slim fit?
 
 

post #17112 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by aw82 View Post

Thanks for the excellent information! This is how I understand the term khaki, but I wanted to make sure.

I have been in a no-tie-or-jacket (though I can wear both generally without too much ridicule) environment for five years and have typically worn slacks (unfortunately mostly polyester blends) most often.  I'm trying to update my wardrobe and am running into a bit of a roadblock in terms of what pants to wear.  I like khakis/chinos, but I struggle with shoe pairings.  Still, I really prefer to wear slacks (wool this time around) but don't want to necessarily wear grey every day.

Thanks again for the input!

In that case a couple of khaki (or chinos, as they are sometimes called) would be a too alternative. You could get a stone colored one and a light caramel and you're good.
post #17113 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post

Originally, khaki was a color and chino was a type of twill fabric. Now they are pretty much interchangeable in the US whether the fabric is twill or not. The fabric is cotton and not wool though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post

The cloth was tightly woven cotton twill

confused.gif
post #17114 of 28509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Namehere2 View Post

I want to expand, preferrably with a pair of suede oxfords or suede chukka/desert boots. The color is the only thing that's stopping me from a decision. What would be more versatile, grey or dark brown?

Dark brown.
Edited by mkarim - 8/26/12 at 7:01pm
post #17115 of 28509

Hi all,

 

I'm just starting out building my suit collection and I'm not extremely knowledgable on the subject.  Most of what I've learned I read here.

 

I've seen what appears to be some "very good" deals on Stile Latino suits.  I know they are a lower line of Attolini, but how do they fit in to the overall heirarchy of high end suits?  I can't find much information on them at all.

 

Are they pretty much in the same class as Isaia? I've had one seller (who is selling Isaia, go figure) tell me the Stile Latino is no where close to the quality of Isaia and that they use synthetics and may not be fully canvassed.  I'm not sure how this could be when the Isaia I was looking at retails at around $3250 and the Stile Latino retails at $3900.

 

I just don't want to make any mistakes.

 

Thanks!

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