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post #32926 of 33197
You won't destroy a leather sole in rain but it's likely that the lifespan will shorten quite a bit . I think toppies are a good decision if you want your soles to withstand more beating. However, I think that dainite soles would be a better choice if possible as they last for ages and look sleek at the same time. And the type of sole doesn't affect whether you can wear it casually , only in some cases formally. Unless you are wearing boat shoes one something which is not the case.
post #32927 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by estranged View Post

Is it good to buy leather sole shoes to use for outside casual ocasions (just walking, etc)?
Leather is the traditional material out of which footwear (including the soles of shoes) is crafted. This has been so for many generations. During that time, countless leather-soled shoes have been exposed to rain. It's not typically been a huge problem for most people.

This doesn't mean that leather soles are necessarily the best choice for wear in extremely wet conditions. But if you have them on your feet once in a while on a moderately rainy day, it's okay. Let your shoes dry out afterward, and they'll likely be fine.

It's something of an SF/ICF (Internet Clothing Forum) thing, to worry excessively about exposing shoes to the elements. In the real world, under non-extreme conditions, it's not a big deal.
Quote:
I am thinking to put toppies on the leather soles, or I will ruin them quick in the rain, etc?

If you want toppies, fine; get some. But as for "ruin them quick," see the "It's something of an SF/ICF..." comment, above.
Quote:
Thinking about this particular shoe:

Are those suede? Because, if so, you ought to worry a whole lot more about the suede factor, than the leather sole factor. This is understood by anyone who is familiar with the classic "Seinfeld" episode, "The Jacket," where Jerry's brand new suede jacket was ruined due to having been exposed to the rain in the course of walking a few blocks. (Or maybe it was snow. I vaguely recall it as having been snow. Oh, well, the lesson applies, either way.)

And they couldn't put it on tv if it weren't true. (Similar to the International Law which makes it a crime to disseminate untruths via the Internet.)
post #32928 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post


Are those suede? Because, if so, you ought to worry a whole lot more about the suede factor, than the leather sole factor. This is understood by anyone who is familiar with the classic "Seinfeld" episode, "The Jacket," where Jerry's brand new suede jacket was ruined due to having been exposed to the rain in the course of walking a few blocks. (Or maybe it was snow. I vaguely recall it as having been snow. Oh, well, the lesson applies, either way.)

I actually prefer wearing my suede when it's wet out. Just need to brush the suede after wearing in rain. No need to worry about the polish getting ruined.
post #32929 of 33197
Recently I saw an ad advertising for a dress shirt. The collar and cuff are white, the body of the shirt is white also. The sleeve fabric are of American flag pattern. I cannot recall the brand name, can any one tell me the name?
post #32930 of 33197

I am hoping someone erased if from your mind for your own benefit, like Men in Black.

post #32931 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pieceofsand View Post

Recently I saw an ad advertising for a dress shirt. The collar and cuff are white, the body of the shirt is white also. The sleeve fabric are of American flag pattern.
I think a good argument could be made that that was not in any sense a dress shirt. Never mind that it had buttons up the front and a collar.

(Obligatory "I'm as patriotic as the next guy" disclaimer.)
post #32932 of 33197

I saw on some thread awhile back that 'front lining (whether to knee or bottom) is not recommended for cotton trousers' - I've searched for that thread and been unable to find it, but I do not recall any rationale being stated for why.

 

I prefer all my wool and linen trousers lined, but have been moving towards more cotton twill for my bespoke trousers (Luxire) - so far I've heeded this advice, but before I drop $ on replacing them with lined ones - any particular reason to avoid? The only thing I can think of is heat, but this isn't much of an issue for me (despite living in a very, very hot climate half of the year) as I spend all my time in non-linen trousers indoors. Does it affect drape, or the fabrics ability to hold a crease? For reference, I'm talking cotton twills in 8-9 oz, give or take - not chinos, (although often made in chino fabrics, but cut like dress trousers).

 

 

EDIT: perhaps I should've added that my reasons for having all other fabrics of trousers lined is ease of movement when sitting down, as well as (at least perceived by me) an improvement in overall drape.

post #32933 of 33197
Any thoughts on how to wear a black 3cm dress belt but with some cross grain texture to it? Can I wear it with smooth black calf leather dress shoes? Would want to wear it with various outfits, in the university setting.
post #32934 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelescrest View Post

Any thoughts on how to wear a black 3cm dress belt but with some cross grain texture to it?
Wear it with black shoes of roughly equivalent formality.

Unless the belt or the shoes are way out of the ordinary, that general rule will serve you just fine.
post #32935 of 33197

So i just bought my pair of brown oxfords and brown derby boots. I also ordered recommended Saphir medaille d'or shoe creme. Is applying this product alone enough to take good care of shoes? Or is this just a polish and does not give much protection for shoes?

 

Or perhaps someone can share some tutorial on how to take good care of shoes? There's just too much information now and hard to select something.

 

@12345Michael54321 thanks a lot!

post #32936 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by estranged View Post
 

So i just bought my pair of brown oxfords and brown derby boots. I also ordered recommended Saphir medaille d'or shoe creme. Is applying this product alone enough to take good care of shoes? Or is this just a polish and does not give much protection for shoes?

 

Or perhaps someone can share some tutorial on how to take good care of shoes? There's just too much information now and hard to select something.

 

@12345Michael54321 thanks a lot!

 

Generally speaking, you want to condition the leather, then use cream first (of similar shade of brown), buff, and then apply a wax polish (how much depending on your tastes, how long since last polish, and - also use of similar shade) and buff it, followed by a a chamois cloth or similar fiber-free cotton to give it a mirror shine (if that's what you're after - a mirror shine, that is). Cream is more for nourishment and color of the leather, and wax more for polish per se (cream absorbs into the leather to some extent, whereas wax sits on top of it). Also (and still speaking quite generally) you don't necessarily have to apply conditioner/cream every time they need a polish. 

 

So, starting with a leather conditioner, let sit a bit, buff, then -> cream, same, -> wax polish the same way, then buff to desired amount of shine. Always use a horsehair shoe brush for buffing. The chamois (or similar) cloth as the final act after buffing the wax is more or less just to add the desired amount of shine, if you will. Good choice on Saphir products - they're really the best of the best, but not absolutely necessary. Conditioner = clean and protect, cream = nourish and some level of polish, wax = primary polishing material. Hope this helps.

post #32937 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Ryan View Post
 

 

Generally speaking, you want to condition the leather, then use cream first (of similar shade of brown), buff, and then apply a wax polish (how much depending on your tastes, how long since last polish, and - also use of similar shade) and buff it, followed by a a chamois cloth or similar fiber-free cotton to give it a mirror shine (if that's what you're after - a mirror shine, that is). Cream is more for nourishment and color of the leather, and wax more for polish per se (cream absorbs into the leather to some extent, whereas wax sits on top of it). Also (and still speaking quite generally) you don't necessarily have to apply conditioner/cream every time they need a polish. 

 

So, starting with a leather conditioner, let sit a bit, buff, then -> cream, same, -> wax polish the same way, then buff to desired amount of shine. Always use a horsehair shoe brush for buffing. The chamois (or similar) cloth as the final act after buffing the wax is more or less just to add the desired amount of shine, if you will. Good choice on Saphir products - they're really the best of the best, but not absolutely necessary. Conditioner = clean and protect, cream = nourish and some level of polish, wax = primary polishing material. Hope this helps.

Very helpful, thank you!

 

So, as far as I understand what I bought is just a wax, which will be used only as a last step. Now I have to get leather conditioner and cream.

post #32938 of 33197

A few questions regarding shirt collars. Does a forward point collar look awkward with notch lapels? Are spread collars better in general with notch lapels? Is there a guideline to how wide the collar should be in comparison with the lapels? I assume they should both be about the same size? Thanks.

 

Picture:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Excuse the lighting. does the collar look right here? Looks really off to me.


Edited by accordion - 6/29/16 at 5:15pm
post #32939 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by accordion View Post
 

A few questions regarding shirt collars. Does a forward point collar look awkward with notch lapels? Are spread collars better in general with notch lapels? Is there a guideline to how wide the collar should be in comparison with the lapels? I assume they should both be about the same size? Thanks.

Generally, lapel type (notch vs peak) shouldn't matter with choice of collar. What does matter is lapel size and collar size. You're right that they should generally be *around* the same size, but most importantly they should be in proper balance with your frame, face, and tie width. Point vs spread is a matter of preference (although SF strongly favors a spread with everything, though I don't necessarily agree) - but a semi-spread (or slightly more spread point, however you want to term it) is a good middle ground in that you get the best of both worlds. That collar does indeed look too narrowly spread for those lapels and would look best with a 2" skinny tie (avoid those as well). For me personally, I use 3"-3.5" lapels on my jackets, and always use a 3" width tie with all of them. This looks balanced to my eye, and is my preference. You look to be a thin guy - which means you can really get away with either collar type, but I'd take advantage of being able to go with a wider spread both a) for aesthetic balance with the jacket lapels and choice of tie, and b) because you've got the face and frame for it (I myself can't do more than a semi-spread, as my round face and low and thicker neck doesn't allow it). You can go as spread as you like (avoid full cutaway, unless you really dig the style, in which case do go for it if you want), but a good rule of thumb (though not absolutely necessary) is to have the collar points reach the lapels in the sense that they tuck away neatly beneath them, and the points themselves don't show when the jacket is buttoned up. Basically, you want the whole look to have aesthetic balance - a skinny 2 inch tie looks silly with standard sized to wide lapels, and vice versa. 

 

Not 'plugging' the company here, although I am a former MTM customer of theirs (I now go full bespoke) and they are a good one by and large, but this is a great page for looking at various collar sizes and styles and includes their dimensions - http://propercloth.com/collar-styles/ - and is a nice frame of reference.

 

EDIT: w/r/t your photo, I'd definitely say the collar is too point/not spread enough for that jacket. With a skinny lapeled jacket and skinny tie, it would be fine in theory (though not my style, and the jacket looks good). Look for a collar that's spread enough to have the points reach the jacket and not jut out over it.

post #32940 of 33197

Thank you for the detailed response. I've a few more question. Regarding the jacket, I'm guessing it doesn't need much alteration, but would taking in the waist a bit be a good idea? My waist is the widest it's ever been and I plan on losing some weight, but even so I feel like there's room to bring it in just a little. Also took some better pictures and with a spread collar. Excuse the badly set collar. For the previous shirt, is the collar too narrow for my neck? And are there any other collars (like button down) you can recommend for this jacket? I don't know if it makes a difference but the point shirt/jacket are of a SWD type fashion designer (Dries Van Noten), so not very formal. Thanks again.

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

File written by Adobe Photoshop¨ 5.0

 

File written by Adobe Photoshop¨ 5.0

 

File written by Adobe Photoshop¨ 5.0


Edited by accordion - 6/30/16 at 9:42am
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