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post #32776 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post


Just something like the tried and true Brooks Bros. 1818 Madison fit suit, or the sort of suit you see worn by many men, particularly men of middle age or above (not that it's impossible to find a traditional-fitting suit on a 25 year old, or some ridiculously close-ftting monstrosity on a 65 year old).

It's a fuller fit, as opposed to the sort of "modern" fit often found from, say, Suit Supply.

I can't understand why you'd need to see pictures. Both types of suits are ubiquitous.


Got it. Explanation negates need for pics. Thanks. (On an aside, I'm one of the 25 y/os who doesn't wear a lot of "modern" cuts.)

post #32777 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by estranged View Post

So should I leave it as it is? I personally like it, it feels good, but it is also quite a slim fit. Salesperson in another store also said it fits me well.
Personally I think the length is okay if you prefer something more trendy. If this is a blazer for life, perhaps not.

You really, really, really should find a trusted tailor.
post #32778 of 33197

 

Two questions about pants to pair with these.

 

Cotton or linen?

 

White or cream?

post #32779 of 33197
Hi Gents,
Do you guys have a different horse hair brush for each one of your shoes? Or just few based on color? Right now I have black, light brown, dark brown, burgundy, green and blue. But there is so.many different hues in the brown/red spectrum.
Thanks in advance
post #32780 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by sd2002 View Post

Do you guys have a different horse hair brush for each one of your shoes?
You can get away with two brushes - one for dark shoes, and one for light shoes.

Getting black shoe cream on your tan shoes can be an issue. Whereas "contaminating," say, dark brown shoes with a trace of burgundy shoe cream is seldom worth much worry.

Then again, you say you have green and blue shoes. And admittedly, I have no personal experience with those colors.

But you know what? if you can afford that wide an assortment of shoes, and you're at all worried about such things, surely you can afford an extra six bucks for another 6" horsehair shine brush. So just for your peace of mind, go ahead and do that. It's not like it'd do any harm, after all.

minor edit, due to spelling error
Edited by 12345Michael54321 - 5/30/16 at 12:04pm
post #32781 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by sd2002 View Post

Hi Gents,
Do you guys have a different horse hair brush for each one of your shoes? Or just few based on color? Right now I have black, light brown, dark brown, burgundy, green and blue. But there is so.many different hues in the brown/red spectrum.
Thanks in advance


Are you talking about polish applicators or buffing brushes? For applicators I use one for each different color polish that I use...For buffing brushes I use 1 for black, 1 for brown, 1 for burgundies, 1 for tans/lighter browns. I use a stiffer brush with shell so add in 1 for black shell & 1 for burgundy shell. I doubt all that is needed versus me being me and me being into shoes.  I wouldn't get a buffing brush for the "many different hues in the brown/red spectrum" ( I'm sure others here would) but I would most certainly stick with an applicator in each polish "hue" you might be using ...

.

post #32782 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by estranged View Post

Salesperson in another store also said it fits me well.
Exceptions surely exist, but I've found that for the most part one should place very little faith in the opinion of a men's clothing salesman.

Some will lie in order to make a sale. More often, they're not knowingly dishonest, just clueless as to what constitutes proper fit or appropriateness for a given purpose.

Honestly, asking the typical menswear salesman, "Do you think this fits me right?" strikes me as akin to asking the typical automobile salesman, "Will this car be reliable?" Or asking an insurance salesman, "Do you think I need more coverage?"

Again, I explicitly state that exceptions exist. But generally speaking, if you lack the knowledge and/or self-confidence to make up your own mind when it comes to buying clothing, you'd be better off hiring a stranger off craigslist to accompany you to the store and offer his opinion, than you would be taking the salesman's word for anything. The stranger off craigslist might be ignorant, but not necessarily any more ignorant than many menswear salesmen. And unlike the salesman, the stranger's got no financial stake in possibly steering you the wrong way in the interest of making a sale, moving slow inventory, proceeding to the next customer, etc.

When I was young, and needed a suit, I'd go with my father - a man who wore suits most days, for half his life. Even if our tastes differed in some areas, dad's advice was far from worthless. Heck, he's also how I learned to polish shoes and how to tie a necktie, when it was okay to remove my jacket or roll up my sleeves and when it wasn't, what you wear to a funeral and what you wear to a wedding.

With all due respect to SF and the information one can glean from similar online resources, there's no substitute for lessons absorbed thru years of observation, or explanations given by someone known and trusted who has walked a similar path, himself.

But I digress.
post #32783 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post


Exceptions surely exist, but I've found that for the most part one should place very little faith in the opinion of a men's clothing salesman.

Some will lie in order to make a sale. More often, they're not knowingly dishonest, just clueless as to what constitutes proper fit or appropriateness for a given purpose.

Honestly, asking the typical menswear salesman, "Do you think this fits me right?" strikes me as akin to asking the typical automobile salesman, "Will this car be reliable?" Or asking an insurance salesman, "Do you think I need more coverage?"

Again, I explicitly state that exceptions exist. But generally speaking, if you lack the knowledge and/or self-confidence to make up your own mind when it comes to buying clothing, you'd be better off hiring a stranger off craigslist to accompany you to the store and offer his opinion, than you would be taking the salesman's word for anything. The stranger off craigslist might be ignorant, but not necessarily any more ignorant than many menswear salesmen. And unlike the salesman, the stranger's got no financial stake in possibly steering you the wrong way in the interest of making a sale, moving slow inventory, proceeding to the next customer, etc.

When I was young, and needed a suit, I'd go with my father - a man who wore suits most days, for half his life. Even if our tastes differed in some areas, dad's advice was far from worthless. Heck, he's also how I learned to polish shoes and how to tie a necktie, when it was okay to remove my jacket or roll up my sleeves and when it wasn't, what you wear to a funeral and what you wear to a wedding.

With all due respect to SF and the information one can glean from similar online resources, there's no substitute for lessons absorbed thru years of observation, or explanations given by someone known and trusted who has walked a similar path, himself.

But I digress.

Good post! 

 

However, two things:

 

1. I don't think it's fair to compare car salesman with suit consultant, as in the suit store they have plenty of suits (usually) in all kinds of sizes, so I don't see why would they have a problem of suggesting me a bigger suit if it indeed fits me better. He can easily bring me a bigger size if it fits me better? Furthermore, bigger suit likely mean that something has to be tailored, which again is beneficial for them.

 

2. Now regarding taste, I agree, and it' really hard to understand what looks 'good'. On this forum people are very strict and usually follow specific guidelines and 'rules', when in reality it's not how it really works. I can see a guy on the street wearing t-shirt and a blazer and in my opinion he looks great, and I am pretty sure majority of the people would agree with me, however on this forum a lot of people consider wearing t-shirt with a blazer a sin. 

 

When I tried that slim fitting jacket of small size I thought I looked great, my girlfriend said I look great, and my brother said the same. Now in the forum I got response that it looks 2 sizes too small. It's really hard to choose unless you have someone really experienced and not biased helping you.

post #32784 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by estranged View Post

Good post! 

1. I don't think it's fair to compare car salesman with suit consultant, as in the suit store they have plenty of suits (usually) in all kinds of sizes, so I don't see why would they have a problem of suggesting me a bigger suit. He can easily bring me a bigger size if it fits me better?

And most car dealerships don't usually have a lot filled with plenty of cars in all kinds of models and colors and option levels?

Look, once the customer has expressed interest in an item - a suit, a car, a house, a wristwatch, etc. - he's 2/3 of the way toward buying the item.

Any experienced salesman will tell you that it's much easier to close the sale by telling the customer, "Your choice suits you perfectly. Good choice!" than by telling the customer, "I don't think this is the best choice for you. Let me show you something else."

You don't want to confuse the issue. You don't want to force the customer into having to choose between A and B. No, you want to confirm that the way he's leaning is indeed valid, and he needn't look any further, and "Will that be Visa or Mastercard? Oh, and you know what would look great with that suit? A really sharp tie. We just happen to be running a 20% off sale on designer ties, today only. Once I ring this up, why don't we go look at some ties?"

In the long run - like, over the course of years and decades - a more honest approach may well prove more profitable for the salesman/retailer, since the customer will remember him as a knowledgeable, helpful, honest salesman, with whom he wants to do business in the future. But let's rejoin the real world, shall we, and acknowledge that many salesmen aren't in it as a 40 year long career at the same store, so this long-term perspective isn't particularly important to them.

No, telling the customer his choice is great means you're more likely to close the immediate sale, and be free to move on the the next customer (or to text your friends, smoke a cigarette, go home, whatever).
Quote:
Furthermore, bigger suit likely mean that something has to be tailored, which again is beneficial for them.

Why in the world would this be so?

A larger suit is more likely to need something taken in slightly. A smaller suit is more likely to need something let out slightly. Either way, pants will need to be hemmed/cuffed.

Anyway, for the vast majority of suit purchasers, hemming/cuffing and maybe shortening the sleeves a little, is all that will be done. Again, in the real world, relatively few suit purchasers opt for extensive tailoring. The average customer is not getting the waist suppressed and having the sleeves on his jacket with the working buttonholes taken up at the shoulder.
Quote:
When I tried that slim fitting jacket of small size I thought I looked great, my girlfriend said I look great, and my brother said the same. Now in the forum I got response that it looks 2 sizes too small. It's really hard to choose unless you have someone really experienced and not biased helping you.

Or unless you know what style you prefer - and this being the Classic Menswear forum, it's reasonable to suggest that many here know what classic menswear is, and like the style - and are sufficiently knowledgeable of what constitutes classic menswear style that you can decide for yourself whether a given jacket looks and fits in keeping with those preferences.

It's perfectly okay to prefer a more modern, closer-fitting style. But that's not really what this forum is about.

Oh, and as for asking a girlfriend for her opinion on what looks good on you... 9 times out of 10, you're better off asking your salesman. smile.gif
post #32785 of 33197
@Mountainstyle, I'd shake it up with taupe linen and crisp white linen shirt.

You can do cream or white also
post #32786 of 33197

could someone please good quality and affordable price card holder in leather? budger would be around 40 to 80 €

preferably from Europe to avoid duties and long shipping times? thanks.

post #32787 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by cezinho View Post

could someone please good quality and affordable price card holder in leather? budger would be around 40 to 80 €
preferably from Europe to avoid duties and long shipping times? thanks.

Mismo card holders (when on sale) would be close to high end of that price range. I'm a big fan of Mismo - good quality reasonable pricing.
post #32788 of 33197

Help me pick a brown tie.  I have a lighter brown tie already, and since I live in the north, I'd prefer to have one that works year round.  They're quite handy in the fall/winter, but also in the summer with other options like my khaki linen suit.  

 

Options:

1) Suitsupply Cotton Knit

http://us.suitsupply.com/en_US/knitted_ties/brown-knitted-tie/D161106.html?m_i=5VZMfHJYOFEk0yLV6p9CVUhE%2BLADjjIeNSNaJa6CuF9a%2BOSBnWwdd9GCRpEfOnwVIY59rn4pIkiZBjmYh3kraczzIvo55Y&utm_source=S-130WK22US&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=sbl&utm_content=&utm_term=

 

2) Suitsupply Wool Knit

http://us.suitsupply.com/en_US/knitted_ties/brown-knitted-tie/D142053.html?q=brown+tie

 

3) Polo RL Silk Knit (I have a burgundy one, and the weave is quite loose)

http://www.ralphlauren.com/product/index.jsp?productId=84169336&fd=Polo+Ralph+Lauren&fd=Brown&ff=Brand&ff=GenericColor&fg=Brand&fg=Color&fv=1000032%2FPolo+Ralph+Lauren&fv=Brown&parentPage=family&selectedColor=Brown

 

Let me add that I rarely wear suits, other than occasionally my khaki linen and navy wool suits for special occasions, and would mostly be wearing this tie with sportcoats, blazer, and lots of knits like v-neck merinos and shawl collar cardigan etc.

 

Or maybe I just need more than one material?

post #32789 of 33197

I am planning to buy two tan/chestnut color shoes - suede chukkas and quarter brogue oxfords. Now I don't want to buy two belts to match each of them, so I will get only 1 belt and wear it with both shoes. Should I get this color suede belt or regular calf belt? 

post #32790 of 33197
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelescrest View Post
 

Help me pick a brown tie.  I have a lighter brown tie already, and since I live in the north, I'd prefer to have one that works year round.  They're quite handy in the fall/winter, but also in the summer with other options like my khaki linen suit.  

 

Options:

1) Suitsupply Cotton Knit

http://us.suitsupply.com/en_US/knitted_ties/brown-knitted-tie/D161106.html?m_i=5VZMfHJYOFEk0yLV6p9CVUhE%2BLADjjIeNSNaJa6CuF9a%2BOSBnWwdd9GCRpEfOnwVIY59rn4pIkiZBjmYh3kraczzIvo55Y&utm_source=S-130WK22US&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=sbl&utm_content=&utm_term=

 

2) Suitsupply Wool Knit

http://us.suitsupply.com/en_US/knitted_ties/brown-knitted-tie/D142053.html?q=brown+tie

 

3) Polo RL Silk Knit (I have a burgundy one, and the weave is quite loose)

http://www.ralphlauren.com/product/index.jsp?productId=84169336&fd=Polo+Ralph+Lauren&fd=Brown&ff=Brand&ff=GenericColor&fg=Brand&fg=Color&fv=1000032%2FPolo+Ralph+Lauren&fv=Brown&parentPage=family&selectedColor=Brown

 

Let me add that I rarely wear suits, other than occasionally my khaki linen and navy wool suits for special occasions, and would mostly be wearing this tie with sportcoats, blazer, and lots of knits like v-neck merinos and shawl collar cardigan etc.

 

Or maybe I just need more than one material?

All these are 6 cm wide. I would not recommend you to buy one of these unless you have jackets with 6 cm wide lapels.

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