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post #29566 of 33196

Light gray (flannels from luxire?) trousers, navy jacket, either blazer or SC. Then probably just more different navy jackets until you want more variety in non work wardrobe, in which case I'd recommend brown and patterned jackets.

post #29567 of 33196

I think for jackets your skin complexion may add some more valuable insight for people to give you recommendations on. Typically Navy and Grey jackets start things off though. For trousers, fairly sure you can't go wrong with grey flannel.

post #29568 of 33196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isolation View Post

... and if you're in a situation that doesn't demand oxford with suits.... then it's fine to just use monks.

I do this often nod[1].gif as much for the situation as for me not giving a fuck.
post #29569 of 33196

Why is it called double cuff?

post #29570 of 33196
Quote:
Originally Posted by mixedmajik View Post
 

If you could only pick one, is a burgundy or cognac colored double monk strap more versatile for everyday business casual wear? Thanks.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooksLauren77 View Post
 

I think monks will work just fine for a business casual environment, brown more so than burgundy.

 

 

I remember seeing monks only once in recent memory, single monks they were, worn with a suit.

 

FWIW, I see monks (mostly double) in the fashion-forward part of town fairly frequently and almost never downtown, in the financial district. I think of Monks as kind of a dandy's dress shoe. I myself being a bit of a dandy, there's a pair of black single monks in my closet. They also seem to be preferred more by consultants and small business owners than desk jockeys - based on the people I've known who wear them.

 

On a trip to London not long ago, I had a chat with the clerk at Church's in Picadilly, where I bought my pair of monks. He referred to black single monks as more of a classic, dressy style while double monks were the modern fashion.

 

While I do often like the look of double monks on others, they're not something I'd generally reach for in my own closet over other options. My own opinion is that brown is better suited to double monks, while black is better suited to single - as black tends to be the dressier option and the second strap's pure superfluity seems to go against the minimalism that dressing up tends to strive for. Oxblood double monks could be fun, but know that you might be perceived as "making a statement" by the nitpickers out there. On the other hand, so what?

post #29571 of 33196
I prefer single monks by far personally, but I do love them.
post #29572 of 33196
I'd just like to point out how NOT to wear double monks.

bright-yellow-pants-double-monk-leather-brown-shoes.jpg
post #29573 of 33196
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post

I'd just like to point out how NOT to wear double monks.

bright-yellow-pants-double-monk-leather-brown-shoes.jpg

Even worse is the "both buckles unfastened" look. I saw that once and I cringed.

post #29574 of 33196
Sprezzatura!

::vomit::
post #29575 of 33196
Hi my name is jock and i want to ask about Harris Tweed and pocket squares. Where can you get one made in that fabric? Ive got silk ones but heard that this cloth is the new one for these. I have tried several stores. I have looked on google but only one company I think in Scotland mrpocketsquares has these. Tried tiebar , mrporter. Any ideas thanks jm from New York.
post #29576 of 33196

Tweed pocket squares seem silly.

post #29577 of 33196

Using tweed to mop your brow or blow your nose sounds painful.

post #29578 of 33196

Hi SF,

 

I have been developing two unique textiles that I plan on kickstarting products out of in the next year.  Both are derived from byproducts of the fishing industry, and I am going to domestically produce all aspects in the USA.

 

My inspiration comes from seeing the extra challenges and costs that come with managing fisheries sustainably here in Alaska - in comparison to those not managed to protect against overfishing, use habitat damaging fishing methods, and are not making an effort to minimize pollution.  As well as how coastal communities culture and economies are built around the Ocean's resources.

 

I wanted to come up with a way to use the byproducts (as much as 50% of certain seafood species), to add value to those managed sustainably, and through my branding bring awareness to the issues our ocean faces. 

 

ANYWAYS...

 

One of the textiles is salmon leather - Which I plan on manufacturing wallets, belts, etc out of.  I have been testing different ways of tanning wild salmon leather, and have a formula that yields a product as strong or stronger than cow leather for the thickness (it is thinner).  

 

The other is a textile similar to cotton in feel and durability, it is a blend of Chitosan and *secret*.  Chitosan is a fiber in crab and shrimp shells, that has many unique qualities, such as easy on the skin, and does not absorb odor. 

 

My marketing angles are made in USA and eco-friendly - since I am upcycling byproducts from 3rd party certified sustainable fisheries.  

 

I do not have prototypes yet, I have just finished perfecting the two textiles. 

 

Survey:

 

I am curious for salmon leather, would a wallet or belt be more interesting to the SF crowd?  

I know that it would depend on the style of each, but assuming you like the wallet and the belt, which would you be more likely to order? 

 

For chitosan blend apparel, would you be more interested in boxer briefs, socks, or a T-shirt/undershirt?  

The reason I am leaning towards these is it does not absorb odor... 

 

To anyone who answers, thank you so much! Just getting these textiles ready for production as been a process!  My background is not at all in marketing, it is in the sustainable fishing industry, and I am really appreciative of any feedback. 

post #29579 of 33196

When buttoning topcoats such as this: https://www.jcrew.com/mens_category/outerwear/topcoats/PRDOVR~05660/05660.jsp?color_name=hthr-naval-blue

 

Do you button all three buttons or only certain ones? I understand it's best to wear the topcoat unbuttoned, but winter months can be a bit harsh. 

post #29580 of 33196
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post
 

When buttoning topcoats such as this: https://www.jcrew.com/mens_category/outerwear/topcoats/PRDOVR~05660/05660.jsp?color_name=hthr-naval-blue

 

Do you button all three buttons or only certain ones? I understand it's best to wear the topcoat unbuttoned, but winter months can be a bit harsh. 


Coats are made to protect you from the elements.  Button depending on weather, and don't shy away from buttoning all of them and even folding up the collar on a cold day.  If you neglect to button the bottom one out of habit from suit jackets, the wind will kick the coat front open and you'll lose a lot of heat that you'd otherwise keep in.

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