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Ask A Question, Get An Answer... - Post All Quick Questions Here (Classic menswear) - Page 1908

post #28606 of 33196
Haha, why? biggrin.gif
Not made by me but i have some new purchases by septieme largeur, patinated biggrin.gif
how are you doing?
post #28607 of 33196

Because it's effete and silly.

 

I'm well, thank you!

post #28608 of 33196
Whats the general consensus on shirt sleeve length? Do you have the sleeve hang from your shoulder to the proper length or is the sleeve stopped by your wrist/hand by the cuff for proper length? In the former scenario if you unbuttoned your cuff it would stay right where it is, in the latter you should have "extra" material such that if you unbuttoned your cuff it would fall further down the hand.

Thoughts?
post #28609 of 33196
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenB View Post

Whats the general consensus on shirt sleeve length? Do you have the sleeve hang from your shoulder to the proper length or is the sleeve stopped by your wrist/hand by the cuff for proper length? In the former scenario if you unbuttoned your cuff it would stay right where it is, in the latter you should have "extra" material such that if you unbuttoned your cuff it would fall further down the hand.

Thoughts?

Generally speaking it would be the latter… especially if worn with a suit or sport coat. You want a little cuff showing and of course when you extend your arm or reach for something you don't want the cuff riding up your forearm. At the same time, when you take the coat off it should not appear that you have an accordion of fabric running up the length of the sleeve. Casual shirts only worn with chinos or jeans and such, may be a bit shorter perhaps, but we're probably talking 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch max. I don't think there is any "rule" exactly, but in my experience I have found a little variance in this respect. ymmv.
post #28610 of 33196
Ideally should trousers be hemmed so the crease stands up straight without "sagging" so to speak? I think it looks better this way but requires a pretty short hem
post #28611 of 33196
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradp View Post

Ideally should trousers be hemmed so the crease stands up straight without "sagging" so to speak? I think it looks better this way but requires a pretty short hem

There is a degree of personal preference involved here, but if you want to be as trend-resistant as possible go for the very slightest of breaks with the line just barely interrupted.
post #28612 of 33196

Hi Styleforum,

 

I recently bought a pair of park avenue on ebay for a decent price. However, there was a recent rain storm and the shoes got wet.

 

The shoes developed spots from where the water had landed on the uppers, I wiped them off as soon as I could and let dried naturally. But the spots reminded even after I tried to polish it off. It looked as if it had formed little bumps, but they didn't feel raised. So I decided to use some elbow grease to try to rub them off. But in the process, I think I might have damage the finish. There is now a dull patch where I was rubbing the leather too vigorously.

 

So, needless to say, I will not be doing that again. How can I get rid of the dull spot? And how can I get rid of the water spot in the future?

post #28613 of 33196
Quote:
Originally Posted by tilting24 View Post
 

Hi Styleforum,

 

I recently bought a pair of park avenue on ebay for a decent price. However, there was a recent rain storm and the shoes got wet.

 

The shoes developed spots from where the water had landed on the uppers, I wiped them off as soon as I could and let dried naturally. But the spots reminded even after I tried to polish it off. It looked as if it had formed little bumps, but they didn't feel raised. So I decided to use some elbow grease to try to rub them off. But in the process, I think I might have damage the finish. There is now a dull patch where I was rubbing the leather too vigorously.

 

So, needless to say, I will not be doing that again. How can I get rid of the dull spot? And how can I get rid of the water spot in the future?

Shoe polish.

post #28614 of 33196

I tried shoe polish, but I can't seem to get the patch back to the original shine to match the rest of the shoes. It's still dull and feels a little rough compare to the surrounding leather. I'm not that great at polishing shoes any how, need a lot of practice. I was thinking about trying a dye like Fiebings Leather Dye, but wanted to wait and see if there is a less drastic approach.


Edited by tilting24 - 9/11/14 at 11:17am
post #28615 of 33196
Hello StyleForum!

I'm looking for reccomendations for replacement buttons for a Tan Linen Sport Coat.

I bought a Brooks Brothers Linen sport coat for summer goodtimes. It's your standard Tan/Camel color. Same coat as what I found here but mine's in better shape: http://www.ebay.com/itm/BROOKS-BROTHERS-ITALY-Silk-Linen-Wool-Tan-Beige-Blazer-Sport-Coat-Jacket-42-43R-/131289590801?_trksid=p2054897.l5658

The fit in the shoulders is perfect. However whoever tailored the sleeves previously did a real botch job and I've lost 3 sleeve buttons over the course of 2 summer weddings.

So it's off to the tailors but I need to get some replacement buttons. Are there any rules of thumb for what colors and material these buttons should be made of?

Also does anyone care about kissing buttons vs. non-kissing.

All opinions and pedantery very welcome.
post #28616 of 33196
Quote:
Originally Posted by tilting24 View Post

I tried shoe polish, but I can't seem to get the patch back to the original shine to match the rest of the shoes. It's still dull and feels a little rough compare to the surrounding leather. I'm not that great at polishing shoes any how, need a lot of practice.
So take the shoes in question to someone who shines shoes professionally and who has a reputation for doing a good job. And let the pro fix it. Explain to the guy exactly what the problem is. Show it to him. Explain what you would ideally like the shoes to look like when you pick them up. Look at his face, and see if he nods up and down, as if he understands what you're saying to him.

If he gets the shoes looking the way you want them, see to it you not only pay him, but thank him for his efforts. Heck, a tip might even be appropriate.

If you mention where you live, somebody here on SF might be able to suggest a cobbler or shoe shine boy (man) in your neck of the woods.
Quote:
I was thinking about trying a dye like Fiebings Leather Dye, but wanted to wait and see if there is a less drastic approach.
"I'm not all that great at swatting flies, and need a lot of practice. But there's this fly in my house right now, so I was thinking of using hand grenades to kill it, but wanted to wait and see if there might be a less drastic approach." smile.gif

Dude, first let someone who is really good at shining shoes have a go at it. Only after the pro fails to make it right should you even consider escalating your response to the level of leather dye.
post #28617 of 33196
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post


So take the shoes in question to someone who shines shoes professionally and who has a reputation for doing a good job. And let the pro fix it. Explain to the guy exactly what the problem is. Show it to him. Explain what you would ideally like the shoes to look like when you pick them up. Look at his face, and see if he nods up and down, as if he understands what you're saying to him.

If he gets the shoes looking the way you want them, see to it you not only pay him, but thank him for his efforts. Heck, a tip might even be appropriate.

If you mention where you live, somebody here on SF might be able to suggest a cobbler or shoe shine boy (man) in your neck of the woods.
"I'm not all that great at swatting flies, and need a lot of practice. But there's this fly in my house right now, so I was thinking of using hand grenades to kill it, but wanted to wait and see if there might be a less drastic approach." smile.gif

Dude, first let someone who is really good at shining shoes have a go at it. Only after the pro fails to make it right should you even consider escalating your response to the level of leather dye.

Thanks for the tips. I was just worried I had ruined the shoes. Back to more reading about how to polish. At least these will be good practice shoes.

post #28618 of 33196

Evening All, i'm looking to buy a houndstooth scarf in neutral colours to take me all the way through winter. I need it to match a navy pea coat and a black knee length overcoat for casual and work respectively. Budget around £100. Any suggestions?

 

Thanks 

post #28619 of 33196
I'm a boot virgin and I'm looking for a good pair of versatile, semi-casual boots. I saw these JD Fisks online today and I was wondering if anyone had any opinions on how well it would work for my upcoming fall and winter season. I would probably use it in a fit with some rolled up jeans and a brown parka most of the time. Other times might be chinos and a sweater. Just looking for feedback on whether these would be a good investment for a first time boot buyer
post #28620 of 33196
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