or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Ask A Question, Get An Answer... - Post All Quick Questions Here (Classic menswear)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ask A Question, Get An Answer... - Post All Quick Questions Here (Classic menswear) - Page 1757

post #26341 of 30768
But for the record, I only wear navy blazers with my GTH pants.

J
post #26342 of 30768
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post

If I strip out all the color of my rubber boots using alcohol wipes by accident. Is there an easy way to restore them?

Would using some sort of leather color polish work?

Try using a silicone-based plastic cleaner - the sort you use to clean interior plastics in a car (you can get them from garages etc). There are a couple of products marketed especially for cleaning rubber boots but it's the same stuff just three times the price. It always puts a nice sheen back on mine, and lubricates the zip.
post #26343 of 30768
Quote:
Originally Posted by J011yroger View Post

 green corduroy pants

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post

burnt orange would be nice

 

Forgive my disheveled appearance after a long night flight, and of course my cords are a darker green, and this is a blurry pic in the gentlemen's lavatory in Heathrow Terminal 4 arrivals, but.....yes:

 

post #26344 of 30768
Quote:
Originally Posted by J011yroger View Post

Yea, but burnt orange or rust is a sweater color, not a shirt color.

J

A burgundy, or burnt orange/rust button down, Werth no tie would with for me, I think. Mustard yellow might work, but might not.
post #26345 of 30768

Light blue or white OCBD would be fine, but you need something else to soften that bright colour.  The rust sweater, a grey sports jacket, even a navy V-neck would do.

post #26346 of 30768

Maybe I should have posted my question in this thread instead of starting my own.  Anyway...

 

I'm looking to buy an interviewing suit for the entry-level legal market.  I want to go dark gray / charcoal.  However, I only have $350-400 to spend.

 

What would be my best bet in that price range?  After reading this site, I kind of want to stay away from the Calvin Kleins of the world...

post #26347 of 30768
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post


Forgive my disheveled appearance after a long night flight, and of course my cords are a darker green, and this is a blurry pic in the gentlemen's lavatory in Heathrow Terminal 4 arrivals, but.....yes:



Nice look Mimo!!
post #26348 of 30768
Looking for a creative seamstress to work in our store in North Jersey Closter area asap. Thank you
post #26349 of 30768
Quote:
Originally Posted by confused1 View Post

Maybe I should have posted my question in this thread instead of starting my own.  Anyway...

I'm looking to buy an interviewing suit for the entry-level legal market.  I want to go dark gray / charcoal.  However, I only have $350-400 to spend.

What would be my best bet in that price range?  After reading this site, I kind of want to stay away from the Calvin Kleins of the world...

One way to go is to look in the buy/sell section of the forum, on Ebay,and in consignment stores. I'm sure that some other guys can recommend particular members that are good to deal with. If you want to try the second hand route, consignment stores can probably help you a lot over the phone, if you call during the day in a week day, and ask if they have any grey suits in your size. That will save you time and gas.

I also would consider how long you need this suit, and when you expect to be able to buy your next couple. If you need a suit to wear occasionally, for a year, or two, you could make do with lower quality, and put your effort into finding a suit that fits exceptionally well.

I would say staying away from the likes of CK is a good move, mostly because they are overpriced for what they are. It's not a sin to wear a fused suit, if that is what you can afford, for now, and it looks best in you, from the options you have. You should just make sure you are getting maximum value for your money, especially in that price range. So, something in the Calvin Klein ilk might be fine, if you get it at a very good discount. I can't recommend many specific makers, myself, but I'm sure some others will have input there.

I have a suit made by Paul Betenley, quick is a fairly small brand, I think, that I got for $400, on sale; it's half canvassed, and decent quality. It is a slim fit though, and I don't know if they make a more classic cut, which is probably more what you are after, but you could check them out online. I've only had it a few months and worn it aux times or so, so I can't speak to longevity. But that's one I know of, fwiw.

I'm sure there are also lawyers around who can help you look as good as possible for the environment -- I would search for a thread on advice for your profession, specifically, and start one if you can't find anything somewhat recent. Even if you already know exactly how you want to look, they may have tips for how to do it cheaper, as they would have had to do it when they started.

I've heard a good review of Black Lapel, which is an online made to measure deal, but I have no personal experience with them, so can't vouch for sure.
post #26350 of 30768
Quote:
Originally Posted by confused1 View Post
 

Maybe I should have posted my question in this thread instead of starting my own.  Anyway...

 

I'm looking to buy an interviewing suit for the entry-level legal market.  I want to go dark gray / charcoal.  However, I only have $350-400 to spend.

 

What would be my best bet in that price range?  After reading this site, I kind of want to stay away from the Calvin Kleins of the world...

 

Suit Supply, probably.  I've heard their quality is fine, and they do a decent service of helping you find which of their standard cuts fits you best.  They can also do in-store adjustments.  I think they start around that price.

post #26351 of 30768
I'd avoid online MTM for a new/beginner. And avoid the fused label brands as you already said.

My personal recommendation is to get all your proper measurements taken:

- Shoulder (most important)
- P2P (pit to pit/chest)
- Sleeve (make sure you account for that nice sliver of cuff you want showing)
- BOC (Back of coat, excluding the collar height)

Once you have those down you can then use Ebay and the B&S forum to find something better than SuitSupply (I'm one of the rare detractors on here, it seems).

But if you need it quickly that may not be an option.
post #26352 of 30768
Quote:
Originally Posted by confused1 View Post

I'm looking to buy an interviewing suit for the entry-level legal market.  I want to go dark gray / charcoal.  However, I only have $350-400 to spend.

What would be my best bet in that price range?
It's all about the fit, confused1. There's no substitute for proper fit. A $2000 suit that doesn't fit quite right, will likely not look as good on you as will a $400 that fits you well.

And fit can be tweaked some after purchase. That's what we call "alterations." But don't kid yourself - Some alterations simply aren't possible. Others are possible, but may be cost prohibitive (particularly on a relatively inexpensive suit). And even for many of those alterations which can be performed well, and at reasonable price, it's usually better to start with a suit that fits you as well as possible in various critical areas, than it is to start with a suit which needs lots of work to fit you properly.

So go visit various men's clothiers. As you haven't indicated whether you're located, I cannot say which stores those are. And try on suits.

Try to go during a slow time. An experienced salesman - maybe even an experienced tailor - can only devote so much time and attention to you on a busy Saturday afternoon. On the other hand, on a Tuesday evening, you may be the only customer there, so he can offer you all the time and advice you need.

Consider going suit shopping in real shoes, and a real shirt. You're not going to be wearing work boots and a t-shirt with your suit on interview day, so why wear them when trying on suits, when you presumably want to get an idea of how the suit looks on you?

Unless you know that she has impeccable taste when it comes to the sort of conservative menswear which you'll want to be wearing when interviewing for an entry-level job in the legal market (Does this mean you want to be hired as a lawyer? Why can't people simply say what job they're after? It does nobody any good to give nebulous descriptions like "entry-level legal market." That could just as easily mean a paralegal, a legal secretary, or any of the dozens of support positions a large firm might need to fill.), leave your wife/girlfriend/sister/mother at home. Women, in general, probably aren't any more ignorant of what suit you should buy than are men, but all too many women seem to think they know how to dress men. And not infrequently, they're guided by what looks currently fashionable, or what some pop culture icon wore at a recent awards show, or some other yardstick having little to do with your professional wardrobe requirements.

So there you have it - try on lots of suits. From various makers. At various stores. Apply those standards of proper fit which you'll have gleaned from the thousands of post on SF (and, maybe one or two other sources) which you'll have read, thought about, and understood in terms of your specific needs.

When you've narrowed down your choices to 2 or 3, post descriptions of them, and cell phone pics of you trying them on, to SF, and ask for advice (should you desire advice at that point).

Or, if this is too much trouble, and you simply want a stranger to tell you which suit to buy, without confusing you with reasons and discussions of relevant considerations, fine. Go to your local Jos. A. Bank store, and buy a charcoal Signature Gold suit, when the Signature Gold suits are on sale for $350. A solid one. Not a patterned one. When on sale, JAB really pushes patterned stuff. But you want your interview suit to be a nice, solid charcoal suit.

With luck, the Sig Gold suit will fit you tolerably well, and can be altered to fit you a little better than just tolerably well, at modest expensive. With luck. It's possible, at any rate. (Hey, the simplest answer is not necessarily the best answer.)

If you remember only one thing from all that I've written, remember this: People will notice fit long before they notice whether your suit is fused or half canvassed. Whether the pick stitching on your lapel was done by machine, or by hand. Proper fit - particularly in areas which are difficult and/or expensive to alter significantly - should be your #1 priority.
post #26353 of 30768
How does a savvy shopper buy an overcoat? My usual tailor quoted $1500+. I'm sure it would be awesome, but I'd rather pay more like $400 on the used market, hopefully for comparable fabric / construction / fit.

The problem: all of my suits and shirts are bespoke, so I don't really know my OTR size. Even if I did (or measured my tailored jackets), I dunno where to add inches when accounting for the layers of clothing underneath, or if manufacturers "include" that when sizing outerwear.

In winter, I wear trousers + odd jacket most days. When I'm in a more formal mood I break out a proper 2-piece; on a more casual workday I'll substitute a slim-fit cashmere sweater. Weekend outfits are almost identical, basically just swapping out the business-y pants for dark jeans or khakis. The fabrics vary widely, but the way I put them together sticks to a basic pattern that works for my body & sense of style. So: stick to solid grey, right?

I figure Feb is a great month for closeout deals here in NYC. Happy to shop locally if that's truly my best bet. But to be honest, I'm lazy -- please teach me how to browse overcoats on eBay / SF classifieds from my couch smile.gif. I'll be more willing to venture into the snow once I've got something warm to wear!
post #26354 of 30768
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Berg View Post

How does a savvy shopper buy an overcoat? My usual tailor quoted $1500+. I'm sure it would be awesome, but I'd rather pay more like $400 on the used market, hopefully for comparable fabric / construction / fit.

The problem: all of my suits and shirts are bespoke, so I don't really know my OTR size. Even if I did (or measured my tailored jackets), I dunno where to add inches when accounting for the layers of clothing underneath, or if manufacturers "include" that when sizing outerwear.

In winter, I wear trousers + odd jacket most days. When I'm in a more formal mood I break out a proper 2-piece; on a more casual workday I'll substitute a slim-fit cashmere sweater. Weekend outfits are almost identical, basically just swapping out the business-y pants for dark jeans or khakis. The fabrics vary widely, but the way I put them together sticks to a basic pattern that works for my body & sense of style. So: stick to solid grey, right?

I figure Feb is a great month for closeout deals here in NYC. Happy to shop locally if that's truly my best bet. But to be honest, I'm lazy -- please teach me how to browse overcoats on eBay / SF classifieds from my couch smile.gif. I'll be more willing to venture into the snow once I've got something warm to wear!

 

Without knowing your size, you'll be forced to go by measurements, which is pretty hit or miss.

 

You live in NYC, one of the top cities for shopping on earth. Go try on some overcoats already!

post #26355 of 30768
Quote:
Originally Posted by confused1 View Post

Maybe I should have posted my question in this thread instead of starting my own.  Anyway...

I'm looking to buy an interviewing suit for the entry-level legal market.  I want to go dark gray / charcoal.  However, I only have $350-400 to spend.

What would be my best bet in that price range?  After reading this site, I kind of want to stay away from the Calvin Kleins of the world...

I'd agree with the JAB suggestion. It's not great, but you can regularly find solid suits in the $300-400 range. If you can't get a sig gold suit on sale for $350 in time for your interview, it's probably worthwhile dipping as "low" as their $895 Signature suits (slim fit) or their $895 Joseph suits (signature quality) -- or even the $795 Traveler. As above posters have said, definitely go with a solid charcoal (a solid navy could work as well), and make sure it fits well in your shoulders and the fabric isn't too shiny. JAB salesmen tend to be pushy and not know their stuff super well, so feel comfortable trying on the awful pinstripe Executive that they'll throw at you in your size to see if it fits and then walk out and buy a nicer charcoal on sale online. Know that with JAB you're not getting that good of a deal, and that your suit's defining characteristic will be "solid." But your chances of finding what you're looking for (a $300-400 interview suit for an entry level legal job) at JAB is probably greater than any other single place, and assuming you stick with the above advice, your chances of messing things up is close to nill.

Brooks Brothers is another solid option (but may be harder to find in your price range). I'd pretty much always prefer BB to JAB, but I think BB suits tend to go for a bit more than $300-400 even during sales (and BB runs sales pretty infrequently whereas JAB is pretty much always running sales).

If you get something besides BB or JAB, avoid going TOO fitted -- most law firms are super conservative places re fashion, and a lot of the suits they'll throw at you at stores are too fashion-forward for an entry level firm interview. My general key is this: if there's much noticeable pulling in the jacket when you button the top button with your arms at your side, it's probably too fitted for your purposes.

I'd say probably about 75% of biglaw associates have at least one JAB or BB suit. The key for a firm interview is (1) wear a conservative solid charcoal (or navy/midnight blue) suit, (2) wear something that fits you well (especially in the shoulders/sleeves), and (3) match your belt with your shoes. Lawyers in most major markets tend not to be too fashion-savvy, so if you're new to dressing up, play it safe and focus on avoiding faux pas more than on impressing anyone with your style. Oh, and get your suit pressed pre-interview.

I know i'm being repetitive and long-winded, but if I were in your shoes, I'd (1) go to several JABs to get fitted to figure out your size (it might take more than one try), (2) wait online for one of the above recommended suits to dip below $350, and (3) bring said suit to a respected tailor and spend about $50-100 getting it as close to perfect as possible. For between $300-400 (depending on how good of a deal you get), you should end up with a solid-quality JAB suit that fits you super well.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Ask A Question, Get An Answer... - Post All Quick Questions Here (Classic menswear)