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post #21886 of 30713

No, but if you deal with someone decent, they can be returned!

 

Anyway, if you think this is expensive, wait for the divorce....

post #21887 of 30713

I train athletes for a living, and it amazes me how little people know about proper shoe fitting.  If you're just wearing your Nikes for day to day wear, you're absolutely correct, they are very forgiving.  I wear Chucks, or a slip on pair of half shoe/half winter boots on a day to day basis, depending on weather and season.  They are quite loose and sloppy, and at 5 in the morning, on my way to the hockey rink, that's just fine, even comfortable.  But, once you start running, or playing, or training, I'm astounded how people don't get themselves and their children shoes that fit.  And skates.  Don't get me started on skates!

post #21888 of 30713
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minipower View Post

Thanks for the reply guys. I wasn't actually considering doing it, just wanted to know the limits of a tailor. It seems with the right money, there aren't any. The main reason is I asked is because I am very slim but have long arms so any shirt that fits me in the chest wont fit in the arms. I will probably get some slim large shirts and get them taken in. Finding casual shirts with neck and arm measurements is a rarity.
Not sure if this is even an option for you but I actually tailor my own shirts and jeans too for that matter. Its really not very difficult as these sort of things go . The sewing techniques are very basic and you can pick up a pretty good used machine cheap
post #21889 of 30713

My quick questions:

 

  1. What types/fabrics/styles of long-sleeve shirts are acceptable for the business casual look? I currently have your average polyester/cotton blend shirts in my wardrobe and I need a change for the office. 
  2. Are regular white T-shirts appropriate to wear as an undershirt or should I wear V-necks?
  3. After tucking my long-sleeve shirt in, the front of the shirt folds outward right above the buckle. My shirts are 15 1/2 size and my wool slacks are 34/30. I have ironed the shirts carefully but it still happens this way.   

 

Have a great Memorial Day! 

post #21890 of 30713
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calculon88 View Post

My quick questions:
  1. What types/fabrics/styles of long-sleeve shirts are acceptable for the business casual look? I currently have your average polyester/cotton blend shirts in my wardrobe and I need a change for the office. 
  2. Are regular white T-shirts appropriate to wear as an undershirt or should I wear V-necks?
  3. After tucking my long-sleeve shirt in, the front of the shirt folds outward right above the buckle. My shirts are 15 1/2 size and my wool slacks are 34/30. I have ironed the shirts carefully but it still happens this way.   

Have a great Memorial Day! 

1. Depends on what business casual means in your office, it's one of the most meaningless phrases in the english language. It can mean anything from sportcoat and trousers, with or without tie; to "polo with khakis, or maybe jeans if they don't have holes in them". Generally, you're safe with classic choices. Light colors- white, light blue, cream, tan, green, yellow if it suits your complexion, pink if you're comfortable with it. Simple patterns, like college striped oxfords or simple checks will always be safe. Poly/cotton has nothing to do with what's acceptable, color, pattern, and fit are what's important there. But as a matter of quality, you should be looking for 100% cotton.

2. With a tie, yes. Without a tie, no. Your undershirt should not be visible.

3. Sounds like a fit issue.
post #21891 of 30713
3. It could be a couple of things but my guess is the rise of the trousers is too short.
post #21892 of 30713
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

A lot of fashion brands make shoes with what looks like stitching in the soles, but that is cosmetic.  I made this mistake some time back when still learning about shoe constructions, and was horrified when my apparently blake-stitched shoes began to separate as the glue degraded!  So be careful, especially if the stitching on what looks like a welt is tight - each one about 2mm or less - and the stitching showing under the sole looks about 5mm per stitch.  It's probably glued together and just with a "traditional" look.  Also, "hand made" means nothing.  It's like "home style" or "farmhouse" or "fresh" in the food industry: as there's no common definition of what it means, it doesn't mean anything at all and is often covering for low quality.

 

The good news is that if something says "blake construction" or "goodyear welted" or "blake rapid construction" (the latter is pretty much as good as goodyear really), it usually is.  And you can get those for not much.  For example, http://samuelwindsorshoes.co.uk/ sells very cheap (sub $100) shoes, and you could get at least your four pairs for under $300.  They won't be wonderful, but they will be proper shoes and not fall apart.  I bought some suede ones for my 14 year old son (he changes shoe size so often it's not worth spending more!), and they looked quite smart.  But I'd suggest going up a notch and getting, say, two pairs for your $300.  You can try www.meermin.es (although beware of long waiting times) for the darlings of Styleforum economy.  Or, for a better service, same price and just less SF-trendiness, you can get Indian-made shoes by English makers like Loake and Barker for about $150.  Try www.herringshoes.co.uk and www.pediwear.co.uk.  They both have outstanding service, will answer all your questions happily on fit, delivery etc, and have a wide selection of styles and prices.  Really, I have ordered from both and been very happy - with the cheap as well as the more expensive lines.  Also, check the clearance lines in your size: you might be lucky and get a big discount off something you like, of even better quality.  Both companies always have some items on sale, and Herring in particular is very easy to search for sale items in your size.

 

Good luck, and let us know what you get!

 

thank you for elaborate response, I will check them out

post #21893 of 30713

Can a wool/linen blend sportscoat be worn in the fall and winter?

post #21894 of 30713

Fashion input please:

 

I know that most members in Classic tuck their shirts in as a rule, but I was out buying slacks today and found a couple pairs that had very nice cuts, fabric, and fits. As I was trying them on, I couldnt help but notice that they looked good with the polo I was wearing and looked good with some fitted T shirts and button ups. 

 

Has anyone here explored the option of wearing slacks as pants, and not a strictly tucked-shirt option? I thought the look was pretty clean myself, a welcome difference from jeans

post #21895 of 30713
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Engineer View Post

Can a wool/linen blend sportscoat be worn in the fall and winter?

If it's too light a color, it'll probably look out of place, and if your fall and winter are actually cold, will probably wear too cool.

The basic rule is that if the weather is appropriate for a garment, you can wear it. So no tweed in summer, or linen in winter. Because one of those things is intended to keep you cooler in hot weather, and the other intended to keep you warm in cool weather.
post #21896 of 30713
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Engineer View Post

Can a wool/linen blend sportscoat be worn in the fall and winter?
Potentially, sure. But much depends on the precise sportscoat and where you're located. Some wool/linen sportscoats are inherently more seasonally constrained than are others, and November in Phoenix, AZ, can differ from November in International Falls, MN.
post #21897 of 30713
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerangedGoose View Post

Fashion input please:

I know that most members in Classic tuck their shirts in as a rule, but I was out buying slacks today and found a couple pairs that had very nice cuts, fabric, and fits. As I was trying them on, I couldnt help but notice that they looked good with the polo I was wearing and looked good with some fitted T shirts and button ups. 

Has anyone here explored the option of wearing slacks as pants, and not a strictly tucked-shirt option? I thought the look was pretty clean myself, a welcome difference from jeans

I tuck in polos and tee shirts too, but yeah, you're free to wear somewhat dressier slacks with more casual shirts. Worsted wool would probably look odd, but a flannel or any sort of rougher fabric would be fine. Personally, the furthest I go with a tee shirt of polo is pressed khakis, but if you like the look, go for it.
post #21898 of 30713
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post


If it's too light a color, it'll probably look out of place, and if your fall and winter are actually cold, will probably wear too cool.

The basic rule is that if the weather is appropriate for a garment, you can wear it. So no tweed in summer, or linen in winter. Because one of those things is intended to keep you cooler in hot weather, and the other intended to keep you warm in cool weather.

The coat is the blue one on the right.its 47% wool 53% linen

post #21899 of 30713
Then you'll probably be fine until you want something warmer.
post #21900 of 30713

any ideas to my Q:

can't imagine a look with a scarf (semi flax, semi cotton, white polka dot on navy blue plain)

could you recommend or point to pics?

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