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post #20431 of 31073

How do you guys manage to tie your shoelaces without having your neatly-tucked shirt get all pulled out of shape in the back?

 

I do the military tuck with my shirts and always wear a belt, but whenever I bend down, I can feel my shirttails rising from beneath my trousers, eager to escape. When I get up, the shirt back has usually ballooned significantly.

post #20432 of 31073

Well, they're a distinctive style, so if you love them, go for it.  But in terms of quality, there are a lot of goodyear welted black loafers around, and as long as they are decent leather (not the really shiny "bookbinder" or "polished binder" as they sometimes say), they should last plenty if you look after them.  Find a pair that you really love the look of, make sure the pics are good enough to see a little bit of grain in the leather, and if the pics are too small, then a kind of leaden dullness rather than plasticky shine, is a good sign.

 

The standard goodyear welting process is a pretty good baseline of quality, whatever the brand.  It's not as good as hand-welted (let's not even get into that now), but if you take care of them and don't wear them every day, they could last as long as you do with the occasional re-sole by a proper cobbler (or the manufacturer).  The real variations will be in the quality of the upper leather, the durability of the sole, and the shape of the last on which the shoe is made.  Other things like whether they put plenty of real cork in the sole for support you will notice once you've had a few different pairs.

 

Anyway, if they're half price that sounds good!  Just maybe shop around a bit - how they look and feel to you is more important than the brand.

post #20433 of 31073
Quote:
Originally Posted by donjuan17 View Post

The pair I'm looking at is not in the suede but in black.
While I'm a big fan of loafers, and have no particular problem with black shoes, I do think that black loafers are often a poor combination.

The loafer tends to be a relatively casual dress shoe. Whereas black tends to lend formality to a pair of shoes. Consequently, black loafers just strike me as being self-contradictory. Like a "Hello Kitty" machine gun, or a rap version of the King James Bible. (Okay, perhaps not quite so glaring a contradiction as all that, but still...)

I recognize that exceptions exist, of course. For example, I've long thought that horsebit loafers look best in black. But what sartorial guideline doesn't have the odd exception or two?

Well, just my take on it. If the loafers were brown, I'd probably have no great objection to the. But in black... I wouldn't buy them. And the fact that you can get them for half price doesn't really change my opinion.
--
Michael
post #20434 of 31073
wow most descriptive answer to my question in a short amount of time. thank you
post #20435 of 31073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalable View Post

How do you guys manage to tie your shoelaces without having your neatly-tucked shirt get all pulled out of shape in the back?

I do the military tuck with my shirts and always wear a belt, but whenever I bend down, I can feel my shirttails rising from beneath my trousers, eager to escape. When I get up, the shirt back has usually ballooned significantly.

The simple answer is that your shirt does not fit you well. Where are the armholes of the shirt? They should be right under your armpit, which allows you 360 degree mobility, which also prevents untucking from simple movements.
post #20436 of 31073

I just received a new Isaia houndstooth sportcoat from STP and am surprised about the amount of loose threads.  It's 37% silk, 33% linen, 30% wool.  Is this common for this blend?

post #20437 of 31073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalable View Post

How do you guys manage to tie your shoelaces without having your neatly-tucked shirt get all pulled out of shape in the back?
1. Tying my shoes seldom requires me to bend over to the extent of doing toe touches. There's usually something upon which I can rest my foot, which elevates above the ground, thus making it easier to reach the laces.

2. I tuck in my shirt, but not so severely that my ability to perform routine tasks is compromised. (I find little desirable, from either a functional or an aesthetic standpoint, in a shirt which fits my form so closely that I cannot tie my shoes.)

Admittedly, this morning I put on loafers, and used an Omsorg shoe horn. This shoe horn is a couple of feet long, and I seem to recall it setting me back a buck and change, at Ikea. So no bending or stretching was required. If I ever mess up my back, I'm absolutely going with loafers and the super-long shoe horn.

My shoe horn isn't pink - it's mostly black, with a little red and white - but other than that, this picture is pretty much what I'm talking about.



--
Michael
post #20438 of 31073

I recently picked up a chocolate (dark brown, but not really anywhere close to black) suit jacket with a medium grey pinstripe on clearance.  No matching pants were available.  Any thoughts on the easiest match for pants on something like that?  My guess is a medium to dark grey, but I'm just starting to pay more attention to my clothes and the insight of more attuned minds would be appreciated.

 

Cheers,

post #20439 of 31073

Noob opinion incoming; I can't imagine pinstripes looking good on an odd jacket.  I sat here for a few minutes trying to visualize it, but I can only see it working as a suit.

post #20440 of 31073
Quote:
Originally Posted by biged781 View Post

Noob opinion incoming; I can't imagine pinstripes looking good on an odd jacket.  I sat here for a few minutes trying to visualize it, but I can only see it working as a suit.

You're in good company here with that opinion.

Pinstripes just don't work for odd jackets except in rare circumstances. Return the jacket.
post #20441 of 31073

Quote:
Originally Posted by usctrojans31 View Post


The simple answer is that your shirt does not fit you well. Where are the armholes of the shirt? They should be right under your armpit, which allows you 360 degree mobility, which also prevents untucking from simple movements.

 

They're fairly high on my shirts - high enough that I struggle to put my fingers in to straighten a t-shirt in my shirt-sleeve if I choose to wear one underneath. I have no trouble doing simple movements and hand waves at that armhole height and tucking. It's just that when I bend down, everything goes to hell - my trousers seem to catch on my thighs, too, as well as my shirt back flying out.

post #20442 of 31073
Quote:
Originally Posted by biged781 View Post

Noob opinion incoming; I can't imagine pinstripes looking good on an odd jacket.  I sat here for a few minutes trying to visualize it, but I can only see it working as a suit.

I like chalk stripe jackets with jeans, but that is about it.
post #20443 of 31073

[deleted]


Edited by Fox Arthur - 2/24/13 at 8:43am
post #20444 of 31073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalable View Post

How do you guys manage to tie your shoelaces without having your neatly-tucked shirt get all pulled out of shape in the back?

 

I do the military tuck with my shirts and always wear a belt, but whenever I bend down, I can feel my shirttails rising from beneath my trousers, eager to escape. When I get up, the shirt back has usually ballooned significantly.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by usctrojans31 View Post


The simple answer is that your shirt does not fit you well. Where are the armholes of the shirt? They should be right under your armpit, which allows you 360 degree mobility, which also prevents untucking from simple movements.

 

I was going to suggest the same thing as USC has.  If you shirt is tailored properly this will greatly reduce your problem.   It's only $15ish to get you shirt tailored, so think about getting 1 or 2 done each payday. 

 

However- if you won't be doing that there are other solutions:

When dressing, put on your pants but don't zip them up yet.  Then tie your shoes (double knot) and then stand up and tuck your shirt, then finish your pants and belt. 

We also will use shirt stays in the military to keep the shirt tight (but I don't do it in my civilian clothes).  We attach the top of the stay to the pleat in the shirt (on both sides-front and back) and then cross them in an X around your legs and attach the bottom clips to the socks.  This keeps the shirt tight- but you will be uncomfortable and lose leg hair. 

post #20445 of 31073

I'm looking for a pair of double monks for around $400.  I am a 9E on a Brannock device and in the Allen Edmonds 1-511 last.  I've considered the Howard Yount model but I've heard bolognese construction is not quite as durable as I'd like.  The Neumora is an option, of course, but I'd like to hear what else is available.

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