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Vietnamese Cuisine. - Page 8

post #106 of 120
I hope NYC gets some decent pho by the time I get there again. It'd be a shame for that city to not have at least one place that makes a good bowl, but from what I've seen and read on the internet, it doesn't appear so at present.
post #107 of 120
This may sound odd. But there is Pho to be had in my parts of the world. Lantern in CH,NC just won a JBeard award. Their Pho is good. As well there are two nice spots in Durham that may suit the needs, but certainly for less cash.
post #108 of 120
There's good pho in random spots that people wouldn't think of. It obviously depends on where vietnamese people live, but since the catholic churches sponsored many Vietnamese people to come to the US in the '70's and then kinda let them loose, there are enclaves all over the US. The Midwest is dotted with Viet enclaves with good food, Kansas City might be the strongest after Southern California and southern Texas. As far as ethnic food goes, Viet food can be a strong-showing ethnic cuisine when it comes to remote locations. There are obviously a couple specific herbs like thai basil and optionally ngo gai (growable at home and/or also shared amongst a few ethnicities) and spices (same) that go into really good, well-made and presented pho, but the backbone of the soup is plain beef bones or chicken, and the pho noodles, fish and chili sauces, are dry goods. Other dishes beyond pho are the same story. A lot of Asian food is like this actually, 90% can be bought at a local wal-mart and the rest is special stuff that is like 2 fresh herbs and a few dry goods from an ethnic store, the only reason it ever shows badly is if the target market isn't their own ethnicity.
post #109 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post
There's good pho in random spots that people wouldn't think of. It obviously depends on where vietnamese people live, but since the catholic churches sponsored many Vietnamese people to come to the US in the '70's and then kinda let them loose, there are enclaves all over the US. The Midwest is dotted with Viet enclaves with good food, Kansas City might be the strongest after Southern California and southern Texas. As far as ethnic food goes, Viet food can be a strong-showing ethnic cuisine when it comes to remote locations. There are obviously a couple specific herbs like thai basil and optionally ngo gai (growable at home and/or also shared amongst a few ethnicities) and spices (same) that go into really good, well-made and presented pho, but the backbone of the soup is plain beef bones or chicken, and the pho noodles, fish and chili sauces, are dry goods. Other dishes beyond pho are the same story. A lot of Asian food is like this actually, 90% can be bought at a local wal-mart and the rest is special stuff that is like 2 fresh herbs and a few dry goods from an ethnic store, the only reason it ever shows badly is if the target market isn't their own ethnicity.
Agree completely. No experience making it outside my kitchen, however the freshest herbs always do it. For me anyways, as does presentation, quantity. And the environs. Always the environs. Hopefully authentic, not necessarily a plastic seat on the side Of the road, although they're nice too.
post #110 of 120
Going to Hanoi in two days. Gonna eat.
post #111 of 120
post #112 of 120
FernGully and pho yo
post #113 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

I hope NYC gets some decent pho by the time I get there again. It'd be a shame for that city to not have at least one place that makes a good bowl, but from what I've seen and read on the internet, it doesn't appear so at present.

apparently they don't have good mexican food either. still want to visit there soon but can't imagine living there since mexican food and vietnamese food is like 65% of my diet
post #114 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

There's good pho in random spots that people wouldn't think of. It obviously depends on where vietnamese people live, but since the catholic churches sponsored many Vietnamese people to come to the US in the '70's and then kinda let them loose, there are enclaves all over the US. The Midwest is dotted with Viet enclaves with good food, Kansas City might be the strongest after Southern California and southern Texas. As far as ethnic food goes, Viet food can be a strong-showing ethnic cuisine when it comes to remote locations. There are obviously a couple specific herbs like thai basil and optionally ngo gai (growable at home and/or also shared amongst a few ethnicities) and spices (same) that go into really good, well-made and presented pho, but the backbone of the soup is plain beef bones or chicken, and the pho noodles, fish and chili sauces, are dry goods. Other dishes beyond pho are the same story. A lot of Asian food is like this actually, 90% can be bought at a local wal-mart and the rest is special stuff that is like 2 fresh herbs and a few dry goods from an ethnic store, the only reason it ever shows badly is if the target market isn't their own ethnicity.

don't forget northern VA. the amount of viet people there...they have some PRIME spots...philly aint bad either. I think if I drive my car back east I'll drop by the midwest, have yet to explore
post #115 of 120
Had some Pho is Paris. Dunno' how locally rated it was but there was quite a line outside, though it was a small place. It was pretty meh. Not bad, not great, slightly less than good really. I expected better, or at least a more interesting French take.
post #116 of 120
What do people here think of the Pho Hoa chain? One just opened up here.
post #117 of 120
There was a great viet place next to GSU that doesn't have a website but there was this dish of pork, it was diced IIRC and two fried eggs were on top. Anyone know what that might be?
post #118 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by edinatlanta View Post

There was a great viet place next to GSU that doesn't have a website but there was this dish of pork, it was diced IIRC and two fried eggs were on top. Anyone know what that might be?

My local place have a very similar dish; they just call it their house spacial in English, but the Viet name is Com Viet Huong
post #119 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lel View Post

Had some Pho is Paris. Dunno' how locally rated it was but there was quite a line outside, though it was a small place. It was pretty meh. Not bad, not great, slightly less than good really. I expected better, or at least a more interesting French take.

I don't know what more of a french take they could take? they're already using all the shitty parts of the cow the french didn't use.
post #120 of 120
I see people have mentioned The Slanted Door but you should check out Tu Lan on 6th st in San Francisco.
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