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Academic dress - Page 2

post #16 of 39
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We may need the help of a psychology major here.
Unfortunately I made the mistake of being a pysch grad -- I however have no real insight outside of what you said. Perhaps they believe that they need to save all their creativity for their work and feel it's wasted on 'mundane' details. The professor in question was an Austrian socialist who taught labour theory...yeah, a lot of creativity needed for promoting decades old theories.
post #17 of 39
When I started teaching at a Midwestern university, secretaries would mistake me for a student, so I wore a coat and tie to class so the students wouldn't mistake me for another student. Two or three students immediately told me in written course evaluations, "lose the tie". So now I wear a herringbone or glen plaid coat, no tie. Recently decided to upgrade my image, but I know I'll get teased by faculty colleagues at first (administrators wear coat/tie or suit, but few faculty wear even business casual, even in class). So I figure it'll be good shoes first, then I'll sneak in a pocket square every now and then until it becomes standard. It'll happen, I'll just be sneaky (I doubt I'll ever go back to the tie, though. Students seem intimidated by it).
post #18 of 39
Thread Starter 
Got my class evaluations back to-day. According to the anonymous comments, me or the tie being intimidating is not the problem. ("He's nice, the course suuucked"). Oh well. Thanks for the advice guys. To-day I have a zippered sweater vest, paisley tie (subdued), and I got a 'looking dapper to-day'. There's a great tweed made in Italy I have my eye on; I'll check to see if it is on sale this week.
post #19 of 39
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(gorgekko @ Jan. 23 2005,01:10) I had a prof too who dressed the exact same way every single day: white button-down oxford, brown khakis. Every day. It wasn't that he was wearing the same clothes every day, he seemed to have an endless supply of both the shirts and pants because his clothes were clean and pressed every day. Bloody odd.
We may need the help of a psychology major here.  I knew professors who regulated their lives so that every day, every thing would be the same for the sake of their intense intellectual activity.  This one comp. lit. guy I know never bought anything other than rice and beef frozen dinners for years.  I think Einstein was a little like that.  I was told by the owner he always wanted the same table at Lahiere's, in Princeton.
I might be wrong, but I seem to remember that all of Einstien's clothing, at the later part of his life, was identical - a collection of identical pants, shirts, sweaters, shoes and various undergarments. the supposed reason for this was so that he wouldn't have to think about what he was wearing. but this may be a legend.
post #20 of 39
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(Fabienne @ Jan. 23 2005,07:29)
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Originally Posted by gorgekko,Jan. 23 2005,01:10
I had a prof too who dressed the exact same way every single day: white button-down oxford, brown khakis. Every day. It wasn't that he was wearing the same clothes every day, he seemed to have an endless supply of both the shirts and pants because his clothes were clean and pressed every day. Bloody odd.
We may need the help of a psychology major here.  I knew professors who regulated their lives so that every day, every thing would be the same for the sake of their intense intellectual activity.  This one comp. lit. guy I know never bought anything other than rice and beef frozen dinners for years.  I think Einstein was a little like that.  I was told by the owner he always wanted the same table at Lahiere's, in Princeton.
I might be wrong, but I seem to remember that all of Einstien's clothing, at the later part of his life, was identical - a collection of identical pants, shirts, sweaters, shoes and various undergarments.  the supposed reason for this was so that he wouldn't have to think about what he was wearing. but this may be a legend.
I did a quick minute of research on this, and found that it is in fact, true. 2 other intersting points: 1. there is a bank called "einstien's wardrobe" 2. there is a performance artist who has 31 identical shirts and wears a different one every day, inspired by Einstien (I wonder what Einstien would say? I wonder what matisse would say?)
post #21 of 39
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When I started teaching at a Midwestern university, secretaries would mistake me for a student, so I wore a coat and tie to class so the students wouldn't mistake me for another student. Two or three students immediately told me in written course evaluations, "lose the tie". So now I wear a herringbone or glen plaid coat, no tie.
I'd tell those students to get a life, and attempt to get an education. I'm sure you don't base grades on how students dress; so I'll be damned if a student tells me how to dress - within, of course, the bounds of decency. Or were they just bothered by the phallic symbolism of the tie?
post #22 of 39
It is nice to hear that the college I teach at is not that different from the rest. My associate dean is a pretty sharp dresser, but I believe it is due to his wife. Other than him, it is pretty bad around here. If I put on something as ordinary as chinos, dress shirt, and sport coat, I get comments on if I have a meeting or something. Its a sad state around here.
post #23 of 39
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Originally Posted by thinman,Jan. 24 2005,12:56
When I started teaching at a Midwestern university, secretaries would mistake me for a student, so I wore a coat and tie to class so the students wouldn't mistake me for another student. Two or three students immediately told me in written course evaluations, "lose the tie". So now I wear a herringbone or glen plaid coat, no tie.
I'd tell those students to get a life, and attempt to get an education. I'm sure you don't base grades on how students dress; so I'll be damned if a student tells me how to dress - within, of course, the bounds of decency. Or were they just bothered by the phallic symbolism of the tie?
Who knows for sure? But like my colleagues who would tease a sharp dresser, I suspect they're just a little insecure about themselves.
post #24 of 39
Recently visited a local, top-of-the-line menswear store, hoping to try on Alden cordovan loafers. None in stock and the owner was out so I left a business card. When the owner called he told me it would look strange for a professor to wear such shoes. They're for CEOs of multinational corporations. I guess professors should all dress like the caricatures of Einstein?.? (in fairness, he did suggest Johnston & Murphy which he also sells). Wasn't sure whether to smack him for suggesting that academics shouldn't wear good shoes or thank him for suggesting I ease into higher quality shoes (the ultra-positive spin). I won't do either and I also won't be going back to his store...waiting for Grenson's to arrive at Bennies and scouting for good shoes at bargain prices. Need to diversify my footwear with some quality loafers and brown wingtips. Aldens hard to find here...
post #25 of 39
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waiting for Grenson's to arrive at Bennies and scouting for good shoes at bargain prices.  Need to diversify my footwear with some quality loafers and brown wingtips.  Aldens hard to find here...
As a newcomer to the forum, and if you haven't read the numerous prior posts on the Grensons, you should be careful about the (narrow) Grenson fit before you order them. A 9E Alden tassel loafer (Aberdeen last), a 9E Alden cordovan penny loafer (Plaza last-runs big), and a 9E Grenson from Bennies vary widely.
post #26 of 39
thinman: J&M are not higher quality than Alden, not even close. And the store owner you describe sounds like a jackass. For one thing, cordovan loafers are about as Ivy League Trad academic as it gets. Few CEOs would be caught dead in them. For another, its one thing to give advice when asked. Gratuitously insulting potential customers is another matter.
post #27 of 39
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I might be wrong, but I seem to remember that all of Einstien's clothing, at the later part of his life, was identical - a collection of identical pants, shirts, sweaters, shoes and various undergarments. the supposed reason for this was so that he wouldn't have to think about what he was wearing. but this may be a legend.
The composer Erik Satie had a similar habit (compulsion?), stocking his wardrobe with a dozen identical suits and scores of identical handkerchiefs. Umbrellas, too, I believe. I kind of admire the simplicity of the approach, but it would take away too much of the enjoyment I get from clothes, what I own and what I aspire to, if I were to emulate the habit. The professorial style in my English departments has been solidly casual: jeans, sweaters, polos. Often the students dress up more than the professors, but then the professors have job security. Those of us on the other side of the table were still in vocational training.
post #28 of 39
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(thinman @ Jan. 24 2005,17:41) waiting for Grenson's to arrive at Bennies and scouting for good shoes at bargain prices.  Need to diversify my footwear with some quality loafers and brown wingtips.  Aldens hard to find here...
As a newcomer to the forum, and if you haven't read the numerous prior posts on the Grensons, you should be careful about the (narrow) Grenson fit before you order them. A 9E Alden tassel loafer (Aberdeen last), a 9E Alden cordovan penny loafer (Plaza last-runs big), and a 9E Grenson from Bennies vary widely.
I'll second this. I've found Grenson to be rather narrow, and I always thought (though I could be wrong) that I've taken a rather normal width last in both Brit. and Amer. shoes. As for finding Aldens: have you tried the directory on their site? Might help. The trick is to find your size in each last, so you can then take advantage of all the on-line deals (something I haven't yet done).
post #29 of 39
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The composer Erik Satie had a similar habit (compulsion?), stocking his wardrobe with a dozen identical suits and scores of identical handkerchiefs. Umbrellas, too, I believe. I kind of admire the simplicity of the approach, but it would take away too much of the enjoyment I get from clothes, what I own and what I aspire to, if I were to emulate the habit. The professorial style in my English departments has been solidly casual: jeans, sweaters, polos. Often the students dress up more than the professors, but then the professors have job security. Those of us on the other side of the table were still in vocational training.
I sort of admire that too. As for the academic front: consider the decline in dress against the explosion in the number of those who go to the universities and probably the moral seriousness with which academics take their own jobs and perhaps more importantly the regretable decline in the way in someways the public sees an academic. They should be respected as much as any other profession. Probably more so, in some ways. Of course one can also credit the 60's to an extent and the ability to remain childish in a structure that perpetuates it.
post #30 of 39
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The composer Erik Satie had a similar habit (compulsion?), stocking his wardrobe with a dozen identical suits and scores of identical handkerchiefs. Umbrellas, too, I believe.
Very true. He dressed like a civil servant. Always the same bowler hat, the same jacket, always too short. Except it wasn't the same jacket: he owned many, all identically too short and tight fitting.
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