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Value of trying on the shoes

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
What value would you guys place on being able to try on the shoes? I find that shoes are very risky to buy from overseas since an improper fit can cause great pain. It seems to me shipping shoes back in the US to someplace in the US would be expensive but reasonable. However, shipping back to the UK would be really expensive. I sent a shirt back and it cost over $20.
post #2 of 9
Well, I would say know how they fit. Are you buying a pair of shoes that (1) you couldn't sell to this Forum or on Ebay for the same as what you paid, or (2) that you have never tried on? If the answer is no to each, then it is indeed a risky proposition. I would describe your foot as well as possible -- and shoes you find comfortable -- in a post here and ask for fit advice. If the answer is yes to either of the questions, then you should have no problems.
post #3 of 9
Quote:
I find that shoes are very risky to buy from overseas since an improper fit can cause great pain.
Oh, absolutely. It probably would cost you $30 or $35 to return shoes to the UK. Ordering shoes when you don't have experience with the fit of the last they're made on is always fraught with peril and has a high potential for disappointment. I've been willing to take the risk of ordering shoes of unknown fit from overseas for brands that are unavailable here and for brands that cost much more here than they do in the UK. Your level of risk tolerance may vary.
post #4 of 9
While we're on this topic, I figure I might as well ask about what defines a good shoe 'fit.' There has been one time in my life where I could honestly say "damn this fits." when I tried on a shoe (btw that was an EG on an 888 last). I was actually trying on a pair of C&J handgrades last weekend, and the 8 1/2 fit 'well' but not perfectly. That is it was comfortable but I could feel a slight bit of looseness as a I walked, though not extraordinarily so. I also tried on an 8 just for good measure and though it 'fit' a lot better, it generally felt a bit tight all around. My question is: is it better to by a tighter shoe fit and hope for it to 'break in' or a slightly looser fit that you are sure to be comfortable in? Keep in mind, these were suede lace-ups, so perhaps that may be a factor. Thanks.
post #5 of 9
If you can't get a perfect fit, I think it's better to err on the side of fitting slightly loose. Depending on the temperature, time of day, and how much walking you do, your feet can swell a considerable amount. Also, adding an insole (or 1/2), tongue pad, or heel pad can help tweek the fit of a shoe considerably. In my experience, a shoe that feels too tight when trying them on will very rarely stretch enough to ever become comfortable.
post #6 of 9
Agreed.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
If you can't get a perfect fit, I think it's better to err on the side of fitting slightly loose.  Depending on the temperature, time of day, and how much walking you do, your feet can swell a considerable amount.  Also, adding an insole (or 1/2), tongue pad, or heel pad can help tweek the fit of a shoe considerably.  In my experience, a shoe that feels too tight when trying them on will very rarely stretch enough to ever become comfortable.
I'm sorry, but why would you buy a shoe if you can't get a perfect fit?
post #8 of 9
Because for some people that would mean a life of barefootedness. And short of bespoke, there is no such thing as a perfect fit -- for ANY item of clothing.
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Because for some people that would mean a life of barefootedness. And short of bespoke, there is no such thing as a perfect fit -- for ANY item of clothing.
I stand corrected.
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