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Toe metal protectors - Page 2

post #16 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post
Vielen dank' Haemus!

Discovered these as well- non-flush but metal

http://www.timpson.co.uk/online-stor...d=9&type_id=45


I get Blakeys/Segs put on the toes of all my shoes after a little wear, and usually on the heels also. The toe taps don't wear down a great deal and, whilst the heel ones take quite a pasting, at £1 a pair they are much cheaper than getting the shoe reheeled. (Plus it means that I can keep my rubber/leather quarter heels for longer - cobblers around here tend to carry only full rubber or quarter-steel heels.)
post #17 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post
Vielen dank' Haemus!

Discovered these as well- non-flush but metal

http://www.timpson.co.uk/online-stor...d=9&type_id=45

Bitte schoen Herr Grant.
Should you need these in wholesale quantities, here it is:
http://www.penninecastings.co.uk/jpgs/range.jpg

I got no.6 of Blakeys off ebay and must say these are pretty small in size, probably only suitable for pointier lasts like CJ 351/358, and not big enough to suit Church's 108 last which is pretty pointed.
Mine Blakeys seem to be of a mid greyish alloy, though wouldn't be surprised if actual Blakeys are pig iron.
post #18 of 56
Just an FYI: Empire Shoe Repair at 991 Lexington in NYC will do flush mount metal taps. I had them do two pair of G&G bench-mades and a pair of EGs. $25/per the quality of workmanship was very good.
post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
The one issue with flush plates being retrofitted, rather than made with that in mind, is that the welt would have to be cut around the toe.

Seems like a plus minus type of thing: you put the plate on to save the toe, but then you lose the welting to rely just on glue.
I don't really see this. Surely the metal toe plates wouldn't be so thick as to require cutting up into the welt. My visualization of the process would have maybe 2 mm. of the outsole (maybe half its thickness at the toe) cut back to accommodate the plate, with, perhaps, some very short nails used along with glue. However, I've never had this done after purchase, so would be interested in learning more about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haemus
and another alternative to toe protection, which should not be welt detrimental at retrofitting - brass nails. It is also bespoke.
These nails won't produce anything like the protective effect of a metal toe plate. They're little more than purely decorative.
post #20 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelloMrFancyPants View Post
Just an FYI: Empire Shoe Repair at 991 Lexington in NYC will do flush mount metal taps. I had them do two pair of G&G bench-mades and a pair of EGs. $25/per the quality of workmanship was very good.

Awesome.
post #21 of 56
The plates I've had installed at Empire don't go up to the welt, they are fastened into a groove cut in the outsole with shallow brass screws. It doesn't take a great thickness of metal to add a good deal of durability.
post #22 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelloMrFancyPants View Post
The plates I've had installed at Empire don't go up to the welt, they are fastened into a groove cut in the outsole with shallow brass screws. It doesn't take a great thickness of metal to add a good deal of durability.

That sounds great.

- B
post #23 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
The one issue with flush plates being retrofitted, rather than made with that in mind, is that the welt would have to be cut around the toe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger View Post
I don't really see this. Surely the metal toe plates wouldn't be so thick as to require cutting up into the welt. My visualization of the process would have maybe 2 mm. of the outsole (maybe half its thickness at the toe) cut back to accommodate the plate, with, perhaps, some very short nails used along with glue. However, I've never had this done after purchase, so would be interested in learning more about it.

I have to agree with Roger on this one. Since the plates do appear to be about 2mm thick, the cobbler would only need to sand/trim down that much outer sole leather. With a lot of channelled soles, that would not be deep enough to expose the channel, definitely not deep enough to reach the welt.

For sure, the procedure would cut into the stitching on a stitched aloft sole. My guess is they dab a bit of glue to prevent further fraying, and then proceed with the installation of the taps. Unless you later have the misfortune of stepping into a vat of solvent, the sole won't come apart. Keep in mind that all the layers of outsole leather are glued together, not just stitched. I used to wear down the soles on Bass Weejuns way past the visible stitching without any consequence.

Unfortunately, there's no chance in hell I could find flush mounted plates around here. It's even less likely I'd trust one of the key/shoe repair shops with the work if I managed to source the plates myself.

I have settled for a bunch of metal taps similar to the ones zjpj83 had installed on his shoes: http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...72&postcount=6

I plan on installing them myself once I go out and get shorter nails/screws/tacks than the ones included.
post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pengranger View Post
I'm looking at getting an MTO G&G in the near future. Does anyone know if G&G will put these on as part of the order?

I've seen a lot of G&G bespoke with them added (however I can't quite afford them yet!)

Yes, G&G will do toe plates on MTO's and stock shoes... Two kinds as well. Regular and beveled like on their bespoke. When I get home, I'll link a few pics...
post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes Bourne View Post
I have to agree with Roger on this one. Since the plates do appear to be about 2mm thick, the cobbler would only need to sand/trim down that much outer sole leather. With a lot of channelled soles, that would not be deep enough to expose the channel, definitely not deep enough to reach the welt.

For sure, the procedure would cut into the stitching on a stitched aloft sole. My guess is they dab a bit of glue to prevent further fraying, and then proceed with the installation of the taps. Unless you later have the misfortune of stepping into a vat of solvent, the sole won't come apart. Keep in mind that all the layers of outsole leather are glued together, not just stitched. I used to wear down the soles on Bass Weejuns way past the visible stitching without any consequence.

Unfortunately, there's no chance in hell I could find flush mounted plates around here. It's even less likely I'd trust one of the key/shoe repair shops with the work if I managed to source the plates myself.

I have settled for a bunch of metal taps similar to the ones zjpj83 had installed on his shoes: http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...72&postcount=6

I plan on installing them myself once I go out and get shorter nails/screws/tacks than the ones included.

I think he meant the stitching around the toe instead of the welt, when the guy at work fits the sunken taps on our shoes he cuts into the channel and slices it off with a knife across the toe, as opposed to that french site showing it being scoured, which would take the stitches out for sure on welted, but when he does it at our place you can still see the stitches keeping it all together before he attaches the taps with a cordless drill, they fit flush this way and its still lockstitched together also, its simple if you know how to use a knife
post #26 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imakeyourshoes View Post
I think he meant the stitching around the toe instead of the welt, when the guy at work fits the sunken taps on our shoes he cuts into the channel and slices it off with a knife across the toe, as opposed to that french site showing it being scoured, which would take the stitches out for sure on welted, but when he does it at our place you can still see the stitches keeping it all together before he attaches the taps with a cordless drill, they fit flush this way and its still lockstitched together also, its simple if you know how to use a knife

^This should put everyone's concerns to rest. It is also interesting to note that installation by the maker is not less intrusive than a retrofitting, as others may have been led to believe. Thank you for the inside knowledge Imakeyourshoes. I certainly wish you would post here more often!
post #27 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imakeyourshoes View Post
I think he meant the stitching around the toe instead of the welt, when the guy at work fits the sunken taps on our shoes he cuts into the channel and slices it off with a knife across the toe, as opposed to that french site showing it being scoured, which would take the stitches out for sure on welted, but when he does it at our place you can still see the stitches keeping it all together before he attaches the taps with a cordless drill, they fit flush this way and its still lockstitched together also, its simple if you know how to use a knife

Imakeyourshoes, your posts rock.


- B
post #28 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes Bourne View Post
^This should put everyone's concerns to rest. It is also interesting to note that installation by the maker is not less intrusive than a retrofitting, as others may have been led to believe. Thank you for the inside knowledge Imakeyourshoes. I certainly wish you would post here more often!

I'm not sure that's what he meant, since the proviso is that the person who is installing the toe plate knows how to handle a knife properly. As I. points out, that is not how the French site shows it being done.

Such cobblers are a subset of those who put toe plates on. If you have someone like that around, great, but that is going to be a rare thing in the U.S. at least.

- B
post #29 of 56
the french site is scouring because its not a welted shoe, its a sole unit, which is why hes scouring it, nothing in there to damage, with a channelled sole you can't really go scouring it, a knife allows you to do it slower
post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imakeyourshoes View Post
the french site is scouring because its not a welted shoe, its a sole unit, which is why hes scouring it, nothing in there to damage, with a channelled sole you can't really go scouring it, a knife allows you to do it slower



Regards.
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