or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › What's the best city to study abroad?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What's the best city to study abroad? - Page 4

post #46 of 89
Calais? I hope the OP does not have depressive tendencies... Leave the razor blades at home...
post #47 of 89
Just talking about the weather, or do you have anything else against Calais? I've had a good time everytime I've been there, except for the drunk Englishmen.
post #48 of 89
Toulouse is a fun little town. Pretty. Not expensive. Very studenty. Great climate. Not a lot of drunk noisy Americans doing the same thing.
post #49 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by redgrail View Post
Just talking about the weather, or do you have anything else against Calais? I've had a good time everytime I've been there, except for the drunk Englishmen.

The weather is suicide-inducing 45 weeks a year, the town is boring to death and the whole area has become a giant duty-free beer supermarket for brits who want to save 4.50 quid on a trunkful of alcohol. Unless you absolutely have to be there, I can't imagine why anyone would want to spend time in Calais. Different strokes, I guess...
post #50 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
You will love it. But you may come back a pinko
Unless I'm mistaken, you are from or lived in France, no? If so, what city could you suggest to get the most out of the culture? Especially in terms of food (hopefully on a budget).
post #51 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackplatano View Post
I'm considering studying abroad for the next semester. I speak english and spanish fluently but I would rather expose myself to a third language. I'm pretty much open to any city. What do you guys recommend?

Harare.
Shona is an up and coming language.
Its also ridiculously cheap right now.
post #52 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackplatano View Post
Unless I'm mistaken, you are from or lived in France, no? If so, what city could you suggest to get the most out of the culture? Especially in terms of food (hopefully on a budget).

Paris by a very very wide margin (you do NOT have to hang out with Americans, Brits or whatever when you're there - there's about 10 million people leaving in and around Paris, I'm sure you can make a couple of French friends...)

then probably (taking into account the student population, academic density and overall attractiveness/fun of the places) Aix, Bordeaux, Grenoble in that order
post #53 of 89
Aix, man... Aix... Do it.
post #54 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Paris by a very very wide margin (you do NOT have to hang out with Americans, Brits or whatever when you're there - there's about 10 million people leaving in and around Paris, I'm sure you can make a couple of French friends...)

then probably (taking into account the student population, academic density and overall attractiveness/fun of the places) Aix, Bordeaux, Grenoble in that order
I think it would be a huge mistake to study in France and not do it in Paris. Aix and Bordeaux are nice, but not in the same world.
post #55 of 89
Of the old capitals of Europe I would recommend Vienna. It has rich history and is quite diverse due to the age old links to Germany and Hungary - the natives are really neither of the two groups. Vienna was quite cheap in the 90s, but prices have gone up recently. The schools are top notch and there is a good mix of contemporary and classic culture too.

I like Oslo a lot, but it is very expensive and you must like every dish you eat to be made from fish. I have never been to a place where the average girl is so hot - you must like blonds though. They seem to have more technically oriented schools there.

Over the past year I have had more people mention how they love Istanbul and that it is a city on the rise. I have heard nothing about education there though.
post #56 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by unpainted huffheinz View Post
I like Oslo a lot, but it is very expensive and you must like every dish you eat to be made from fish.

You know nothing about Norwegian cuisine.
post #57 of 89
I have no experience with this - I did my study abroad in the US, where they speak a funny sounding version of my native tongue - but how exactly would one go about studying on a solo program in a country where they do not speak the language. Understand that if you do the tour-bus-study-abroad package (which isnt really study abroad at all, its just a Contiki tour with classes to interrupt the sightseeing) they put you in classes that are basically done in English, but doing it solo and taking a place in a French university - not sure how that works.

If you go to France with your fluent English and Spanish and walk into your macroeconomics class on day 1 - you are not going to understand a word of what the teacher says.

If you start cramming in French classes now, ok, by the time you get there, you will be basically conversational...which is a long way off from the level you will have to read and write at to be turning in university term papers.

If you go to France and then just study beginners French, intermediate French and then RJMan French, you haven't really added anything to your degree back at your home university, nor any real future CV booster other than a third (and basically inconsequential) language. You've basically just done a year-long French language immersion program, and are going to have to catch up on a bunch of units when you get home.

I guess I just don't know how these things work. Is there something I am missing?
post #58 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T View Post
I have no experience with this - I did my study abroad in the US, where they speak a funny sounding version of my native tongue - but how exactly would one go about studying on a solo program in a country where they do not speak the language. Understand that if you do the tour-bus-study-abroad package (which isnt really study abroad at all, its just a Contiki tour with classes to interrupt the sightseeing) they put you in classes that are basically done in English, but doing it solo and taking a place in a French university - not sure how that works.

If you go to France with your fluent English and Spanish and walk into your macroeconomics class on day 1 - you are not going to understand a word of what the teacher says.

If you start cramming in French classes now, ok, by the time you get there, you will be basically conversational...which is a long way off from the level you will have to read and write at to be turning in university term papers.

If you go to France and then just study beginners French, intermediate French and then RJMan French, you haven't really added anything to your degree back at your home university, nor any real future CV booster other than a third (and basically inconsequential) language. You've basically just done a year-long French language immersion program, and are going to have to catch up on a bunch of units when you get home.

I guess I just don't know how these things work. Is there something I am missing?



classes are taken in english. It would be too impractical to take say a psychology class in french and actually learn something.
post #59 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackplatano View Post
Unless I'm mistaken, you are from or lived in France, no? If so, what city could you suggest to get the most out of the culture? Especially in terms of food (hopefully on a budget).

My cousin did his study in Lyon, which he really loved and was a very positive experience for him. It has a good rep as a student city.

Another friend of mine studied in Strasbourg on the German border. It's a city that mixes traditionally French and German influences and cultures. I know she enjoyed the student life there and the city is home to a number of European pan-government institutions, if you have an interest in government.

She commuted to Paris twice a week to work at a marketing firm and often stayed the weekend there with friends. She was a marketing and international relations major.

I did the dreaded US student group excursion in Paris which shared the features that others here have already noted. If I had it to do again, I might pick one of the smaller cities to really get that full cultural immersion. Paris is French but its also very international (and very expensive on a student budget!)

Also it might turn you in to a pinko
post #60 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackplatano View Post
classes are taken in english. It would be too impractical to take say a psychology class in french and actually learn something.
French universities speak English? Would never have thought...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › What's the best city to study abroad?